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A tropical marine microbial natural products geobibliography as an example of desktop exploration of current research using web visualisation tools.

Mukherjee J, Llewellyn LE, Evans-Illidge EA - Mar Drugs (2008)

Bottom Line: Global visualisation of datasets is now becoming available to the world through powerful and readily available software such as Worldwind, ArcGIS Explorer and Google Earth.Here we demonstrate the value of this approach to marine microbial biodiscovery by developing a geobibliography that incorporates citations on tropical and near-tropical marine microbial natural products research with Google Earth and additional ancillary global data sets.The tools and software used are all readily available and the reader is able to use and install the material described in this article.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Environmental Studies, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032, India. joydeep_envstu@school.jdvu.ac.in

ABSTRACT
Microbial marine biodiscovery is a recent scientific endeavour developing at a time when information and other technologies are also undergoing great technical strides. Global visualisation of datasets is now becoming available to the world through powerful and readily available software such as Worldwind, ArcGIS Explorer and Google Earth. Overlaying custom information upon these tools is within the hands of every scientist and more and more scientific organisations are making data available that can also be integrated into these global visualisation tools. The integrated global view that these tools enable provides a powerful desktop exploration tool. Here we demonstrate the value of this approach to marine microbial biodiscovery by developing a geobibliography that incorporates citations on tropical and near-tropical marine microbial natural products research with Google Earth and additional ancillary global data sets. The tools and software used are all readily available and the reader is able to use and install the material described in this article.

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The Caribbean section of the geobibliography overlaid with the information from the Millennium Development Goal Monitor which provides socioeconomic information for every country in the world (http://www.mdgmonitor.org/).
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f3-md-06-00550: The Caribbean section of the geobibliography overlaid with the information from the Millennium Development Goal Monitor which provides socioeconomic information for every country in the world (http://www.mdgmonitor.org/).

Mentions: Nevertheless, considering that each placemark in the geobibliography is the flag of the nation of the senior author, it is clear that microbial marine natural products research is a highly international endeavour with the flags of many nations occurring within the marine territories of other countries. In virtually all cases where this occurs, co-authors on the citation include scientists from the source country, indicating that cross-country collaborations that include the country of origin are common. Collaboration can provide an important avenue for some countries without the necessary skills, infrastructure and funds to undertake their own biodiscovery program. Many tropical regions and countries have very low Gross Domestic Products (GDP) [42], which is likely to limit resources available to undertake biodiscovery of any kind. Figure 3 visualises the Caribbean region with the geobibliography overlaid with information about Millennium Development Goals, including socioeconomic data such as GDP. The Millennium Development Goal project is an initiative of the United Nations to focus international efforts on global development standards [103]. Particularly, for some biodiverse but developing nations, collaborations have the potential to provide capacity building including skills development and technology transfer. In the context of seeking equitable benefit sharing for source countries according to obligations under the CBD, capacity building is widely recognised as an important benefit beyond the sharing of monetary benefits that arise from the utilisation of genetic resources. Berlinck et al [14] provide a valuable discourse of the values of these international collaborations as well as some of the hurdles, in an international collaboration with one developing country. The paradigm for benefit sharing by capacity building also stands true for international collaborations between developed countries. The case study of a partnership between the international pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca and an Australian university is a good example of the research funding, training, conservation benefits and infrastructure development that can arise from such partnerships [59].


A tropical marine microbial natural products geobibliography as an example of desktop exploration of current research using web visualisation tools.

Mukherjee J, Llewellyn LE, Evans-Illidge EA - Mar Drugs (2008)

The Caribbean section of the geobibliography overlaid with the information from the Millennium Development Goal Monitor which provides socioeconomic information for every country in the world (http://www.mdgmonitor.org/).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2630847&req=5

f3-md-06-00550: The Caribbean section of the geobibliography overlaid with the information from the Millennium Development Goal Monitor which provides socioeconomic information for every country in the world (http://www.mdgmonitor.org/).
Mentions: Nevertheless, considering that each placemark in the geobibliography is the flag of the nation of the senior author, it is clear that microbial marine natural products research is a highly international endeavour with the flags of many nations occurring within the marine territories of other countries. In virtually all cases where this occurs, co-authors on the citation include scientists from the source country, indicating that cross-country collaborations that include the country of origin are common. Collaboration can provide an important avenue for some countries without the necessary skills, infrastructure and funds to undertake their own biodiscovery program. Many tropical regions and countries have very low Gross Domestic Products (GDP) [42], which is likely to limit resources available to undertake biodiscovery of any kind. Figure 3 visualises the Caribbean region with the geobibliography overlaid with information about Millennium Development Goals, including socioeconomic data such as GDP. The Millennium Development Goal project is an initiative of the United Nations to focus international efforts on global development standards [103]. Particularly, for some biodiverse but developing nations, collaborations have the potential to provide capacity building including skills development and technology transfer. In the context of seeking equitable benefit sharing for source countries according to obligations under the CBD, capacity building is widely recognised as an important benefit beyond the sharing of monetary benefits that arise from the utilisation of genetic resources. Berlinck et al [14] provide a valuable discourse of the values of these international collaborations as well as some of the hurdles, in an international collaboration with one developing country. The paradigm for benefit sharing by capacity building also stands true for international collaborations between developed countries. The case study of a partnership between the international pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca and an Australian university is a good example of the research funding, training, conservation benefits and infrastructure development that can arise from such partnerships [59].

Bottom Line: Global visualisation of datasets is now becoming available to the world through powerful and readily available software such as Worldwind, ArcGIS Explorer and Google Earth.Here we demonstrate the value of this approach to marine microbial biodiscovery by developing a geobibliography that incorporates citations on tropical and near-tropical marine microbial natural products research with Google Earth and additional ancillary global data sets.The tools and software used are all readily available and the reader is able to use and install the material described in this article.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Environmental Studies, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032, India. joydeep_envstu@school.jdvu.ac.in

ABSTRACT
Microbial marine biodiscovery is a recent scientific endeavour developing at a time when information and other technologies are also undergoing great technical strides. Global visualisation of datasets is now becoming available to the world through powerful and readily available software such as Worldwind, ArcGIS Explorer and Google Earth. Overlaying custom information upon these tools is within the hands of every scientist and more and more scientific organisations are making data available that can also be integrated into these global visualisation tools. The integrated global view that these tools enable provides a powerful desktop exploration tool. Here we demonstrate the value of this approach to marine microbial biodiscovery by developing a geobibliography that incorporates citations on tropical and near-tropical marine microbial natural products research with Google Earth and additional ancillary global data sets. The tools and software used are all readily available and the reader is able to use and install the material described in this article.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus