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Antimicrobial drug use and resistance in Europe.

van de Sande-Bruinsma N, Grundmann H, Verloo D, Tiemersma E, Monen J, Goossens H, Ferech M, European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System GroupEuropean Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption Project Gro - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: The data obtained from the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption and the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System suggest that variation of consumption coincides with the occurrence of resistance at the country level.Linear regression analysis showed that the association between antimicrobial drug use and resistance was specific and robust for 2 of 3 compound pathogen combinations, stable over time, but not sensitive enough to explain all of the observed variations.Ecologic studies based on routine surveillance data indicate a relation between use and resistance and support interventions designed to reduce antimicrobial drug consumption at a national level in Europe.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Our study confronts the use of antimicrobial agents in ambulatory care with the resistance trends of 2 major pathogens, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Escherichia coli, in 21 European countries in 2000-2005 and explores whether the notion that antimicrobial drug use determines resistance can be supported by surveillance data at national aggregation levels. The data obtained from the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption and the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System suggest that variation of consumption coincides with the occurrence of resistance at the country level. Linear regression analysis showed that the association between antimicrobial drug use and resistance was specific and robust for 2 of 3 compound pathogen combinations, stable over time, but not sensitive enough to explain all of the observed variations. Ecologic studies based on routine surveillance data indicate a relation between use and resistance and support interventions designed to reduce antimicrobial drug consumption at a national level in Europe.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Occurrence of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli (FQRE) plotted against outpatient use of fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agents in 17 European countries including 95% confidence intervals. DID, defined daily doses per 1,000 inhabitants. See Table 1 footnote for country designations.
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Figure 4: Occurrence of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli (FQRE) plotted against outpatient use of fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agents in 17 European countries including 95% confidence intervals. DID, defined daily doses per 1,000 inhabitants. See Table 1 footnote for country designations.

Mentions: Proportions of FQRE in European countries were best explained by the country-specific use data for fluoroquinolones. Fluoroquinolone consumption as reported to the ESAC network explained 36% of the variance observed in EARSS data (p<0.01; Figure 4). This effect appeared to be specific and was not associated or confounded by consumption of the other antimicrobial classes.


Antimicrobial drug use and resistance in Europe.

van de Sande-Bruinsma N, Grundmann H, Verloo D, Tiemersma E, Monen J, Goossens H, Ferech M, European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System GroupEuropean Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption Project Gro - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Occurrence of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli (FQRE) plotted against outpatient use of fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agents in 17 European countries including 95% confidence intervals. DID, defined daily doses per 1,000 inhabitants. See Table 1 footnote for country designations.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2630720&req=5

Figure 4: Occurrence of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli (FQRE) plotted against outpatient use of fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agents in 17 European countries including 95% confidence intervals. DID, defined daily doses per 1,000 inhabitants. See Table 1 footnote for country designations.
Mentions: Proportions of FQRE in European countries were best explained by the country-specific use data for fluoroquinolones. Fluoroquinolone consumption as reported to the ESAC network explained 36% of the variance observed in EARSS data (p<0.01; Figure 4). This effect appeared to be specific and was not associated or confounded by consumption of the other antimicrobial classes.

Bottom Line: The data obtained from the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption and the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System suggest that variation of consumption coincides with the occurrence of resistance at the country level.Linear regression analysis showed that the association between antimicrobial drug use and resistance was specific and robust for 2 of 3 compound pathogen combinations, stable over time, but not sensitive enough to explain all of the observed variations.Ecologic studies based on routine surveillance data indicate a relation between use and resistance and support interventions designed to reduce antimicrobial drug consumption at a national level in Europe.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Our study confronts the use of antimicrobial agents in ambulatory care with the resistance trends of 2 major pathogens, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Escherichia coli, in 21 European countries in 2000-2005 and explores whether the notion that antimicrobial drug use determines resistance can be supported by surveillance data at national aggregation levels. The data obtained from the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption and the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System suggest that variation of consumption coincides with the occurrence of resistance at the country level. Linear regression analysis showed that the association between antimicrobial drug use and resistance was specific and robust for 2 of 3 compound pathogen combinations, stable over time, but not sensitive enough to explain all of the observed variations. Ecologic studies based on routine surveillance data indicate a relation between use and resistance and support interventions designed to reduce antimicrobial drug consumption at a national level in Europe.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus