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Dog bite- fracture of the mandible in a 9 month old infant: a case report.

Walker T, Modayil P, Cascarini L, Collyer J - Cases J (2009)

Bottom Line: A 9 month old female was brought by her parents to the Emergency Department after sustaining a dog bit to the face.The patients wounds were irrigated, and she was given oral antibiotics.The case presentation highlights the important of proper assessment of facial lacerations for not only neurovascular status and the parotid duct, but also the hard tissues.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Queen Victoria Hospital, Holtye Road, East Grinstead, RH19 3DZ, UK. tomwmw@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: We present the case of a fractured mandible due to a dog bite in a 9 month old female. Dog bites in this age group are rare as are fractured mandibles. There are only two reported cases of fractured mandibles due to dog bites in the literature. This is the youngest. The other reported cases were in a 1 year old and also in a 4 year old.

Case presentation: A 9 month old female was brought by her parents to the Emergency Department after sustaining a dog bit to the face. This was assessed by the emergency physicians and deemed to be superficial. The patients wounds were irrigated, and she was given oral antibiotics. She was transferred to our department were she was assessed under anaesthetic. A fracture of her mandible was discovered and treated with open reduction and internal fixation.

Conclusion: The case presentation highlights the important of proper assessment of facial lacerations for not only neurovascular status and the parotid duct, but also the hard tissues. The case also highlights the difficulty of treating children and infants with fractures of the mandible and the importance of follow-up to monitor growth.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Intraoperative view of healed mandibular fracture.
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Figure 3: Intraoperative view of healed mandibular fracture.

Mentions: She was transferred to our unit the following day, fasted in preparation for an examination under general anaesthesia and primary closure of her facial lacerations. During the procedure it was found that she had sustained an open fracture of her left mandible consistent with a dog bite. (fig 1). This was treated via a trans-oral approach with a five hole 1.2 mm titanium plate and four 3 mm screws. (fig 2). She had her facial laceration copiously irrigated with normal saline and chlorhexidine and primarily closed in with a fine nylon suture. She was discharged home the next day. Seven days later she attended for removal of sutures under a general anaesthetic and examination of her jaw. The facial wounds were healing well and there was no movement at the fracture site. Ten weeks after the first operation she was admitted for removal of her mandibular plate under general anaesthetic. There was good bony union and the plate was removed with no complications (fig 3). She will continue to be reviewed in clinic to monitor dentoalveolar development and mandibular growth.


Dog bite- fracture of the mandible in a 9 month old infant: a case report.

Walker T, Modayil P, Cascarini L, Collyer J - Cases J (2009)

Intraoperative view of healed mandibular fracture.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2630302&req=5

Figure 3: Intraoperative view of healed mandibular fracture.
Mentions: She was transferred to our unit the following day, fasted in preparation for an examination under general anaesthesia and primary closure of her facial lacerations. During the procedure it was found that she had sustained an open fracture of her left mandible consistent with a dog bite. (fig 1). This was treated via a trans-oral approach with a five hole 1.2 mm titanium plate and four 3 mm screws. (fig 2). She had her facial laceration copiously irrigated with normal saline and chlorhexidine and primarily closed in with a fine nylon suture. She was discharged home the next day. Seven days later she attended for removal of sutures under a general anaesthetic and examination of her jaw. The facial wounds were healing well and there was no movement at the fracture site. Ten weeks after the first operation she was admitted for removal of her mandibular plate under general anaesthetic. There was good bony union and the plate was removed with no complications (fig 3). She will continue to be reviewed in clinic to monitor dentoalveolar development and mandibular growth.

Bottom Line: A 9 month old female was brought by her parents to the Emergency Department after sustaining a dog bit to the face.The patients wounds were irrigated, and she was given oral antibiotics.The case presentation highlights the important of proper assessment of facial lacerations for not only neurovascular status and the parotid duct, but also the hard tissues.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Queen Victoria Hospital, Holtye Road, East Grinstead, RH19 3DZ, UK. tomwmw@hotmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: We present the case of a fractured mandible due to a dog bite in a 9 month old female. Dog bites in this age group are rare as are fractured mandibles. There are only two reported cases of fractured mandibles due to dog bites in the literature. This is the youngest. The other reported cases were in a 1 year old and also in a 4 year old.

Case presentation: A 9 month old female was brought by her parents to the Emergency Department after sustaining a dog bit to the face. This was assessed by the emergency physicians and deemed to be superficial. The patients wounds were irrigated, and she was given oral antibiotics. She was transferred to our department were she was assessed under anaesthetic. A fracture of her mandible was discovered and treated with open reduction and internal fixation.

Conclusion: The case presentation highlights the important of proper assessment of facial lacerations for not only neurovascular status and the parotid duct, but also the hard tissues. The case also highlights the difficulty of treating children and infants with fractures of the mandible and the importance of follow-up to monitor growth.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus