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Tilted seat position for non-ambulant individuals with neurological and neuromuscular impairment: a systematic review.

Michael SM, Porter D, Pountney TE - Clin Rehabil (2007)

Bottom Line: To determine the effects of tilt-in-space seating on outcomes for people with neurological or neuromuscular impairment who cannot walk.Search through electronic databases (MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, AMED).REVIEWER'S CONCLUSION: Posterior tilt can reduce pressures at the interface under the pelvis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Physics and Engineering, Leeds University Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK. smm@medphysics.leeds.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Objective: To determine the effects of tilt-in-space seating on outcomes for people with neurological or neuromuscular impairment who cannot walk.

Data sources: Search through electronic databases (MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, AMED). Discussions with researchers who are active in field.

Review methods: Selection criteria included interventional studies that investigated the effects of seat tilt on outcome or observational studies that identified outcomes for those who had used tilt-in-space seating in populations with neurological or neuromuscular impairments. Two reviewers independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed quality and extracted data.

Results: Nineteen studies were identified which fulfilled the selection criteria. Seventeen of these were essentially before-after studies investigating the immediate effects of tilting the seating. All studies looked at populations with neurological impairment, and most were on children with cerebral palsy (n=8) or adults with spinal cord injury (n=8). REVIEWER'S CONCLUSION: Posterior tilt can reduce pressures at the interface under the pelvis.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic lateral views of seat showing (a) upright, (b) posteriorly and (c) anteriorly tilted seat orientations. α = posterior tilt angle, β = anterior tilt angle.
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Figure 1: Schematic lateral views of seat showing (a) upright, (b) posteriorly and (c) anteriorly tilted seat orientations. α = posterior tilt angle, β = anterior tilt angle.

Mentions: Studies were identified that investigated the effects of seat tilt on outcome for the seated individual. Experimental studies that compared outcomes at different angles of tilt were included as were observational studies that compared outcomes for those that had used tilt-in-space seating to those that had used a seat in a fixed orientation. A tilt of the seat was taken to be a rotation of the complete seat about a mediolateral axis, and tilt angle is as described in Figure 1.Figure 1


Tilted seat position for non-ambulant individuals with neurological and neuromuscular impairment: a systematic review.

Michael SM, Porter D, Pountney TE - Clin Rehabil (2007)

Schematic lateral views of seat showing (a) upright, (b) posteriorly and (c) anteriorly tilted seat orientations. α = posterior tilt angle, β = anterior tilt angle.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2630001&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic lateral views of seat showing (a) upright, (b) posteriorly and (c) anteriorly tilted seat orientations. α = posterior tilt angle, β = anterior tilt angle.
Mentions: Studies were identified that investigated the effects of seat tilt on outcome for the seated individual. Experimental studies that compared outcomes at different angles of tilt were included as were observational studies that compared outcomes for those that had used tilt-in-space seating to those that had used a seat in a fixed orientation. A tilt of the seat was taken to be a rotation of the complete seat about a mediolateral axis, and tilt angle is as described in Figure 1.Figure 1

Bottom Line: To determine the effects of tilt-in-space seating on outcomes for people with neurological or neuromuscular impairment who cannot walk.Search through electronic databases (MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, AMED).REVIEWER'S CONCLUSION: Posterior tilt can reduce pressures at the interface under the pelvis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Physics and Engineering, Leeds University Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK. smm@medphysics.leeds.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Objective: To determine the effects of tilt-in-space seating on outcomes for people with neurological or neuromuscular impairment who cannot walk.

Data sources: Search through electronic databases (MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, AMED). Discussions with researchers who are active in field.

Review methods: Selection criteria included interventional studies that investigated the effects of seat tilt on outcome or observational studies that identified outcomes for those who had used tilt-in-space seating in populations with neurological or neuromuscular impairments. Two reviewers independently selected trials for inclusion, assessed quality and extracted data.

Results: Nineteen studies were identified which fulfilled the selection criteria. Seventeen of these were essentially before-after studies investigating the immediate effects of tilting the seating. All studies looked at populations with neurological impairment, and most were on children with cerebral palsy (n=8) or adults with spinal cord injury (n=8). REVIEWER'S CONCLUSION: Posterior tilt can reduce pressures at the interface under the pelvis.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus