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Bilateral ophthalmic artery occlusion in rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis.

Song YM, Shin SY - Korean J Ophthalmol (2008)

Bottom Line: On the 2nd day of hospitalization, sudden visual loss and light reflex loss developed.On rhinologic examination, mucormyosis was noticed.Despite treatment, visual acuity and light reflex did not recover and he died 4 days after admission.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To report a case of bilateral ophthalmic artery occlusion in rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis.

Methods: Reviewed clinical charts, photographs, and fluorescein angiography

Results: An 89-year-old man with poorly controlled diabetes developed sudden bilateral ptosis, complete ophthalmoplegia of the right eye, and superior rectus palsy of the left eye. Brain and orbit magnetic resonance imaging showed midbrain infarction and mild diffuse sinusitis. On the 2nd day of hospitalization, sudden visual loss and light reflex loss developed. There were retinal whitening, absence of retinal arterial filling, and a total lack of choroidal perfusion on fluorescein angiography of the right eye. The left eye showed a cherry red spot in the retina and the absence of retinal arterial filling and partial choroidal perfusion on fluorescein angiography. On rhinologic examination, mucormyosis was noticed. Despite treatment, visual acuity and light reflex did not recover and he died 4 days after admission.

Conclusions: Bilateral ophthalmic artery occlusion can occur in rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Fluorescein angrography on the day after initial presentation: (Left) Right eye (Right) left eye, at late phase. The retinal vessels are not imaged at all, even 10 minutes after injecting the dye. Slight choroid fluorescence is observed in the left eye.
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Figure 4: Fluorescein angrography on the day after initial presentation: (Left) Right eye (Right) left eye, at late phase. The retinal vessels are not imaged at all, even 10 minutes after injecting the dye. Slight choroid fluorescence is observed in the left eye.

Mentions: Choroidal perfusion was not found in the right eye and partial choroidal fluorescence was observed in the left eye (Fig. 4). Thus, he was diagnosed with simultaneous bilateral ophthalmic artery occlusions. On the same day, rhinologic examination revealed a destructed nasal septum, black necrotic lump in the nasal cavity and an ulcer on the hard palate, which was confirmed as murcomycosis upon biopsy (Fig. 5).


Bilateral ophthalmic artery occlusion in rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis.

Song YM, Shin SY - Korean J Ophthalmol (2008)

Fluorescein angrography on the day after initial presentation: (Left) Right eye (Right) left eye, at late phase. The retinal vessels are not imaged at all, even 10 minutes after injecting the dye. Slight choroid fluorescence is observed in the left eye.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2629957&req=5

Figure 4: Fluorescein angrography on the day after initial presentation: (Left) Right eye (Right) left eye, at late phase. The retinal vessels are not imaged at all, even 10 minutes after injecting the dye. Slight choroid fluorescence is observed in the left eye.
Mentions: Choroidal perfusion was not found in the right eye and partial choroidal fluorescence was observed in the left eye (Fig. 4). Thus, he was diagnosed with simultaneous bilateral ophthalmic artery occlusions. On the same day, rhinologic examination revealed a destructed nasal septum, black necrotic lump in the nasal cavity and an ulcer on the hard palate, which was confirmed as murcomycosis upon biopsy (Fig. 5).

Bottom Line: On the 2nd day of hospitalization, sudden visual loss and light reflex loss developed.On rhinologic examination, mucormyosis was noticed.Despite treatment, visual acuity and light reflex did not recover and he died 4 days after admission.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To report a case of bilateral ophthalmic artery occlusion in rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis.

Methods: Reviewed clinical charts, photographs, and fluorescein angiography

Results: An 89-year-old man with poorly controlled diabetes developed sudden bilateral ptosis, complete ophthalmoplegia of the right eye, and superior rectus palsy of the left eye. Brain and orbit magnetic resonance imaging showed midbrain infarction and mild diffuse sinusitis. On the 2nd day of hospitalization, sudden visual loss and light reflex loss developed. There were retinal whitening, absence of retinal arterial filling, and a total lack of choroidal perfusion on fluorescein angiography of the right eye. The left eye showed a cherry red spot in the retina and the absence of retinal arterial filling and partial choroidal perfusion on fluorescein angiography. On rhinologic examination, mucormyosis was noticed. Despite treatment, visual acuity and light reflex did not recover and he died 4 days after admission.

Conclusions: Bilateral ophthalmic artery occlusion can occur in rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus