Limits...
A case report on the change of the refractive power after a blunt trauma.

Kim SI, Cha YJ, Park SE - Korean J Ophthalmol (2008)

Bottom Line: To determine the pathogenesis of transient myopia after blunt eye trauma.The depth of the anterior chamber, the thickness of the lens, and the axial length were measured by A-scan ultrasonography in both eyes.We suspect that the depth reduction in the anterior chamber, the increase in anterior to posterior lens diameter, and the edema in the ciliary body are all related to the change in the refractive power following the blunt trauma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Eulji University School of Medicine, Eulji Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To determine the pathogenesis of transient myopia after blunt eye trauma.

Methods: In one patient, the refraction of both eyes (the left eye was injured, but the right eye was not) was measured with an autorefractometer. The cycloplegic refraction was measured at the early stage of trauma and again 3 months after the blunt eye injury. The angle and depth of the anterior chamber, the ciliary body, and the choroids were examined by ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) over 3 months. The depth of the anterior chamber, the thickness of the lens, and the axial length were measured by A-scan ultrasonography in both eyes. During the 3 months after the injury, we made comparisons between the menifest and the cycloplegic refractions, the depths of anterior chambers, the thickness of the lenses, the axial lengths, and the UBM-determined appearances of the angles and depths of the anterior chambers, the ciliary bodies, and the choroids in both eyes.

Results: We suspect that the depth reduction in the anterior chamber, the increase in anterior to posterior lens diameter, and the edema in the ciliary body are all related to the change in the refractive power following the blunt trauma.

Conclusions: Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) and ultrasonography of the anterior segment in the eye may be helpful to diagnose and confirm changes in the refractive power that occur after trauma.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Ultrasound microscopy on the right eye shows a normal chamber angle and the ciliary body at 1 month post-trauma. Note that there was no thickness of the ciliary body
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2629954&req=5

Figure 1: Ultrasound microscopy on the right eye shows a normal chamber angle and the ciliary body at 1 month post-trauma. Note that there was no thickness of the ciliary body

Mentions: Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) examination was performed 4 times on each section that was divided by a 90 degree interval in a normal eye, and 12 times on each section that was divided by a 30 degree interval in a traumatized eye (UBM Model 480, Humphrey Instrument Ind., San Leandro, CA) at the 4 week time point and the 3 month time point after the trauma. The thickness of the ciliary body was measured with an imaginary line that was vertical to the corneal endothelium and passed through the scleral spur (black arrows in Fig. 1, 2, 3). Refractive power was measured with a TOPCON KR-8100 Autorefractor and the cycloplegic refraction was performed under the maximal dilated state after dropping a cycloplegic agent (Cyclopentolate). All measurements were repeated 3 times and the mean values are reported. Examination for the anterior chamber angle was performed with a Goldmann four mirror lens to find whether cyclodialysis exists or not. After cycloplegic refraction, ultrasound examination was performed 7 times with the Humphrey A-scan system 835. We took an average of 5 values that excluded the maximal and minimal values. We also measured the anterior to posterior diameter of the lens, the depth of the anterior chamber, and the axial length. The units for these values are reported in millimeters. Intraocular pressure was measured 3 times with a non-contact tonometer, TOPCON CT-80 and reported as a mean value.


A case report on the change of the refractive power after a blunt trauma.

Kim SI, Cha YJ, Park SE - Korean J Ophthalmol (2008)

Ultrasound microscopy on the right eye shows a normal chamber angle and the ciliary body at 1 month post-trauma. Note that there was no thickness of the ciliary body
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2629954&req=5

Figure 1: Ultrasound microscopy on the right eye shows a normal chamber angle and the ciliary body at 1 month post-trauma. Note that there was no thickness of the ciliary body
Mentions: Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) examination was performed 4 times on each section that was divided by a 90 degree interval in a normal eye, and 12 times on each section that was divided by a 30 degree interval in a traumatized eye (UBM Model 480, Humphrey Instrument Ind., San Leandro, CA) at the 4 week time point and the 3 month time point after the trauma. The thickness of the ciliary body was measured with an imaginary line that was vertical to the corneal endothelium and passed through the scleral spur (black arrows in Fig. 1, 2, 3). Refractive power was measured with a TOPCON KR-8100 Autorefractor and the cycloplegic refraction was performed under the maximal dilated state after dropping a cycloplegic agent (Cyclopentolate). All measurements were repeated 3 times and the mean values are reported. Examination for the anterior chamber angle was performed with a Goldmann four mirror lens to find whether cyclodialysis exists or not. After cycloplegic refraction, ultrasound examination was performed 7 times with the Humphrey A-scan system 835. We took an average of 5 values that excluded the maximal and minimal values. We also measured the anterior to posterior diameter of the lens, the depth of the anterior chamber, and the axial length. The units for these values are reported in millimeters. Intraocular pressure was measured 3 times with a non-contact tonometer, TOPCON CT-80 and reported as a mean value.

Bottom Line: To determine the pathogenesis of transient myopia after blunt eye trauma.The depth of the anterior chamber, the thickness of the lens, and the axial length were measured by A-scan ultrasonography in both eyes.We suspect that the depth reduction in the anterior chamber, the increase in anterior to posterior lens diameter, and the edema in the ciliary body are all related to the change in the refractive power following the blunt trauma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Eulji University School of Medicine, Eulji Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To determine the pathogenesis of transient myopia after blunt eye trauma.

Methods: In one patient, the refraction of both eyes (the left eye was injured, but the right eye was not) was measured with an autorefractometer. The cycloplegic refraction was measured at the early stage of trauma and again 3 months after the blunt eye injury. The angle and depth of the anterior chamber, the ciliary body, and the choroids were examined by ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) over 3 months. The depth of the anterior chamber, the thickness of the lens, and the axial length were measured by A-scan ultrasonography in both eyes. During the 3 months after the injury, we made comparisons between the menifest and the cycloplegic refractions, the depths of anterior chambers, the thickness of the lenses, the axial lengths, and the UBM-determined appearances of the angles and depths of the anterior chambers, the ciliary bodies, and the choroids in both eyes.

Results: We suspect that the depth reduction in the anterior chamber, the increase in anterior to posterior lens diameter, and the edema in the ciliary body are all related to the change in the refractive power following the blunt trauma.

Conclusions: Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) and ultrasonography of the anterior segment in the eye may be helpful to diagnose and confirm changes in the refractive power that occur after trauma.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus