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Outcomes of 6 hour part-time occlusion treatment combined with near activities for unilateral amblyopia.

Park KS, Chang YH, Na KD, Hong S, Han SH - Korean J Ophthalmol (2008)

Bottom Line: Main outcome measures were best corrected visual acuity, line improvement, and success rate.At the last follow-up, visual acuity improved from baseline by an average of 3.7+/-2.4 lines (0.38+/-0.26 log MAR), and follow-up period was 37.41+/-25.83 months (3.08+/-2.12 years).The significant factor was the age at initial treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Institute of Vision Research, Department of Ophthalmology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of the part-time occlusion therapy with near activities in monocular amblyopic patients according to gender, age, severity of amblyopia, and the cause of amblyopia.

Methods: Fifty eight patients who were prescribed part-time occlusion therapy with near activity from July 1998 to October 2004, were included in this retrospective study. All patients were divided into groups by gender, age, severity of amblyopia, and the cause of amblyopia. Main outcome measures were best corrected visual acuity, line improvement, and success rate.

Results: At the end of patch therapy, visual acuity improved from baseline by an average of 3.2+/-2.5 lines (0.33+/-0.26 log MAR), and follow-up period was 19.71+/-14.61 months (1.62+/-1.20 years). At the last follow-up, visual acuity improved from baseline by an average of 3.7+/-2.4 lines (0.38+/-0.26 log MAR), and follow-up period was 37.41+/-25.83 months (3.08+/-2.12 years). The success rate was 86% (50 patients) at the end of patch therapy. In 44 patients out of 50 patients (88%), the visual acuity was maintained. While 43 patients out of 47 patients who were less than 7 years old (91%) achieved success, 7 patients out of 11 patients 7 years or older (64%) achieved success (p=0.035).

Conclusions: Six-hour part-time occlusion treatment combined with near activities appears to be favorable in treating 58 children during follow-up of mean 3.08 years. The significant factor was the age at initial treatment.

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Change of visual acuity according to cause of amblyopia in 12 months.
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Figure 1: Change of visual acuity according to cause of amblyopia in 12 months.

Mentions: Consecutive changes of visual acuity were evaluated in 36 patients who could be followed up for 12 months (Fig. 1). Gradual linear improvement of visual acuity was noted. There were two steep slopes in the curve, at 3-4 months and at 11-12 months.


Outcomes of 6 hour part-time occlusion treatment combined with near activities for unilateral amblyopia.

Park KS, Chang YH, Na KD, Hong S, Han SH - Korean J Ophthalmol (2008)

Change of visual acuity according to cause of amblyopia in 12 months.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2629949&req=5

Figure 1: Change of visual acuity according to cause of amblyopia in 12 months.
Mentions: Consecutive changes of visual acuity were evaluated in 36 patients who could be followed up for 12 months (Fig. 1). Gradual linear improvement of visual acuity was noted. There were two steep slopes in the curve, at 3-4 months and at 11-12 months.

Bottom Line: Main outcome measures were best corrected visual acuity, line improvement, and success rate.At the last follow-up, visual acuity improved from baseline by an average of 3.7+/-2.4 lines (0.38+/-0.26 log MAR), and follow-up period was 37.41+/-25.83 months (3.08+/-2.12 years).The significant factor was the age at initial treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Institute of Vision Research, Department of Ophthalmology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of the part-time occlusion therapy with near activities in monocular amblyopic patients according to gender, age, severity of amblyopia, and the cause of amblyopia.

Methods: Fifty eight patients who were prescribed part-time occlusion therapy with near activity from July 1998 to October 2004, were included in this retrospective study. All patients were divided into groups by gender, age, severity of amblyopia, and the cause of amblyopia. Main outcome measures were best corrected visual acuity, line improvement, and success rate.

Results: At the end of patch therapy, visual acuity improved from baseline by an average of 3.2+/-2.5 lines (0.33+/-0.26 log MAR), and follow-up period was 19.71+/-14.61 months (1.62+/-1.20 years). At the last follow-up, visual acuity improved from baseline by an average of 3.7+/-2.4 lines (0.38+/-0.26 log MAR), and follow-up period was 37.41+/-25.83 months (3.08+/-2.12 years). The success rate was 86% (50 patients) at the end of patch therapy. In 44 patients out of 50 patients (88%), the visual acuity was maintained. While 43 patients out of 47 patients who were less than 7 years old (91%) achieved success, 7 patients out of 11 patients 7 years or older (64%) achieved success (p=0.035).

Conclusions: Six-hour part-time occlusion treatment combined with near activities appears to be favorable in treating 58 children during follow-up of mean 3.08 years. The significant factor was the age at initial treatment.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus