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A case of an asymptomatic intralenticular foreign body.

Chang YS, Jeong YC, Ko BY - Korean J Ophthalmol (2008)

Bottom Line: A 66-year-old male visited our ophthalmology department because of decreased visual acuity in his left eye 6 months after he suffered ocular trauma while mowing.He had not been treated because he did not experience any discomfort.Despite the absence of symptoms, patients reporting a history of lawn mowing should be thoroughly examined.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, College of Medicine, Konyang University, Myung Gok Eye Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this article is to report a case of an asymptomatic intralenticular metallic foreign body that was retained for 6 months. A 66-year-old male visited our ophthalmology department because of decreased visual acuity in his left eye 6 months after he suffered ocular trauma while mowing. He had not been treated because he did not experience any discomfort. His corrected visual acuity was 0.4. Central corneal opacity, an intralenticular metallic foreign body, and an intact posterior capsule were observed on slit lamp examination. Phacoemulsification with posterior chamber lens implantation and simultaneous removal of the intralenticular foreign body was performed. Seventeen days after the operation, his corrected visual acuity was 1.0, the intraocular lens was well-seated, and there was no intraocular inflammation. In this case report, a patient was found to have an intralenticular metallic foreign body retained for 6 months. During this time he did not experience any ocular dysfunction due to the foreign body. Mowing accidents are common in Korea. Despite the absence of symptoms, patients reporting a history of lawn mowing should be thoroughly examined.

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Slit lamp photography at the first visit shows corneal opacity and an intralenticular metallic foreign body.
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Figure 1: Slit lamp photography at the first visit shows corneal opacity and an intralenticular metallic foreign body.

Mentions: A 66-year-old male visited our ophthalmology department because of decreased visual acuity in his left eye of 10 days duration. The patient had a past history of ocular trauma to the left eye while mowing his lawn 6 months before his visit. He had not been treated because he did not feel any discomfort. On presentation, his best-corrected visual acuities (BCVAs) were 1.0 and 0.4 in the right and left eye, respectively. The intraocular pressure was 11 mmHg in the right eye and 14 mmHg in the left eye. In the right eye, the anterior segment did not show any obvious abnormalities. In the left eye, corneal opacity, which did not involve the visual axis, an incidental intralenticular metallic foreign body, and lens opacity were found. The posterior lens capsule was intact (Fig. 1). There was no inflammation in the cornea or anterior chamber. Funduscopy showed no definite abnormalities in either eye. Emergent surgical removal was performed. Under local anesthesia, capsulorrhexis of the anterior lens capsule and hydrodissection and hydrodelineation of the lens were performed via a corneal incision site. With viscoelastic aid, the intralenticular foreign body was elevated into the anterior chamber. The foreign body was then removed with foreign body forceps. Phacoemulsification and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation was then performed. The implanted IOL was an AcrySof™ (SA60AT, Optic 6.0 mm, Length 13.0 mm, Alcon, USA). The diameter of the removed foreign body was about 1 mm and it was identified to be metallic by a magnet. It was thought to be a part of the lawn mower blade (Fig. 2). At 3 days postoperatively, the BCVA of the left eye was 1.0. There were no specific findings except trace cell reactions in the anterior chamber. At 17 days postoperatively, the BCVA of the left eye was 1.0. There was no inflammation in the anterior chamber and the IOL was well-seated (Fig. 3).


A case of an asymptomatic intralenticular foreign body.

Chang YS, Jeong YC, Ko BY - Korean J Ophthalmol (2008)

Slit lamp photography at the first visit shows corneal opacity and an intralenticular metallic foreign body.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2629922&req=5

Figure 1: Slit lamp photography at the first visit shows corneal opacity and an intralenticular metallic foreign body.
Mentions: A 66-year-old male visited our ophthalmology department because of decreased visual acuity in his left eye of 10 days duration. The patient had a past history of ocular trauma to the left eye while mowing his lawn 6 months before his visit. He had not been treated because he did not feel any discomfort. On presentation, his best-corrected visual acuities (BCVAs) were 1.0 and 0.4 in the right and left eye, respectively. The intraocular pressure was 11 mmHg in the right eye and 14 mmHg in the left eye. In the right eye, the anterior segment did not show any obvious abnormalities. In the left eye, corneal opacity, which did not involve the visual axis, an incidental intralenticular metallic foreign body, and lens opacity were found. The posterior lens capsule was intact (Fig. 1). There was no inflammation in the cornea or anterior chamber. Funduscopy showed no definite abnormalities in either eye. Emergent surgical removal was performed. Under local anesthesia, capsulorrhexis of the anterior lens capsule and hydrodissection and hydrodelineation of the lens were performed via a corneal incision site. With viscoelastic aid, the intralenticular foreign body was elevated into the anterior chamber. The foreign body was then removed with foreign body forceps. Phacoemulsification and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation was then performed. The implanted IOL was an AcrySof™ (SA60AT, Optic 6.0 mm, Length 13.0 mm, Alcon, USA). The diameter of the removed foreign body was about 1 mm and it was identified to be metallic by a magnet. It was thought to be a part of the lawn mower blade (Fig. 2). At 3 days postoperatively, the BCVA of the left eye was 1.0. There were no specific findings except trace cell reactions in the anterior chamber. At 17 days postoperatively, the BCVA of the left eye was 1.0. There was no inflammation in the anterior chamber and the IOL was well-seated (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: A 66-year-old male visited our ophthalmology department because of decreased visual acuity in his left eye 6 months after he suffered ocular trauma while mowing.He had not been treated because he did not experience any discomfort.Despite the absence of symptoms, patients reporting a history of lawn mowing should be thoroughly examined.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, College of Medicine, Konyang University, Myung Gok Eye Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this article is to report a case of an asymptomatic intralenticular metallic foreign body that was retained for 6 months. A 66-year-old male visited our ophthalmology department because of decreased visual acuity in his left eye 6 months after he suffered ocular trauma while mowing. He had not been treated because he did not experience any discomfort. His corrected visual acuity was 0.4. Central corneal opacity, an intralenticular metallic foreign body, and an intact posterior capsule were observed on slit lamp examination. Phacoemulsification with posterior chamber lens implantation and simultaneous removal of the intralenticular foreign body was performed. Seventeen days after the operation, his corrected visual acuity was 1.0, the intraocular lens was well-seated, and there was no intraocular inflammation. In this case report, a patient was found to have an intralenticular metallic foreign body retained for 6 months. During this time he did not experience any ocular dysfunction due to the foreign body. Mowing accidents are common in Korea. Despite the absence of symptoms, patients reporting a history of lawn mowing should be thoroughly examined.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus