Limits...
Protective effects of epigallocatechin gallate after UV irradiation of cultured human lens epithelial cells.

Heo J, Lee BR, Koh JW - Korean J Ophthalmol (2008)

Bottom Line: We irradiated cultured human lens epithelial cells with a 30-second pulse from a UV lamp with an irradiance of 0.6 mW/cm2.The cell number was measured with a microscopic counting chamber and cell viability was evaluated using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay.In a dose-dependent manner, viability was also higher in EGCG-treated cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate the protective effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) against UV irradiation of cultured human lens epithelial cells.

Methods: We irradiated cultured human lens epithelial cells with a 30-second pulse from a UV lamp with an irradiance of 0.6 mW/cm2. Five minutes and 1 hour after UV irradiation, we administered 0, 5, 10, 15, 25, 50, or 100 uM EGCG. The cell number was measured with a microscopic counting chamber and cell viability was evaluated using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay.

Results: Compared to untreated cells, the total number of cultured human lens epithelial cells was markedly higher after UV irradiation. In a dose-dependent manner, viability was also higher in EGCG-treated cells.

Conclusions: EGCG increased the cell count and cell viability after UV irradiation of cultured human lens epithelial cells, indicating that EGCG can protect lens epithelium against UV damage.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Lens epithelial cell viability after UV irradiation. Cell viability of cultured human lens epithelial cells after UV irradiation was markedly increased with Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) administration group and was increased dose-dependent way. Basis (0) was group with UV irradiation without administration of EGCG. There was no significance between the time to administration of EGCG and the survival rate of cells (P=0.129). (A) 5 minutes after UV irradiation, (B) 1 hour after UV irradiation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2629900&req=5

Figure 3: Lens epithelial cell viability after UV irradiation. Cell viability of cultured human lens epithelial cells after UV irradiation was markedly increased with Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) administration group and was increased dose-dependent way. Basis (0) was group with UV irradiation without administration of EGCG. There was no significance between the time to administration of EGCG and the survival rate of cells (P=0.129). (A) 5 minutes after UV irradiation, (B) 1 hour after UV irradiation.

Mentions: Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) protected cultured human lens epithelial cells from oxidative-stress-induced cytotoxicity with excellent efficacy. Compared with unirradiated cells (Fig. 1A), exposure to UV irradiation without administration of EGCG resulted in significant cell loss (Fig. 1B). With administration of 100 µM EGCG, both 5 minutes (Fig. 1C) and 1 hour (Fig. 1D) after UV irradiation, the cell count increased to those seen in unirradiated cells. The cell count of cultured human lens epithelial cells after UV irradiation markedly increased upon EGCG administration (Fig. 2). There was no significant relationship between the time to EGCG administration and cell loss (P=0.719). Cell viability after UV irradiation increased in a dose-dependent manner upon treatment with EGCG, as determined by the MTT assay (Fig. 3). Also, there were significant differences in viability between cells treated with 5 or 10 µM (P=0.000) and 10 or 15 µM EGCG (P=0.000). There was no significant difference between cells treated with 0 or 5 µM EGCG (P=0.233) or between cells treated with 15, 25, 50, or 100 µM EGCG (P=0.166). Compared with untreated cells, viability increased by approximately 24.8% or 21.5% in cells treated with 100 µM of EGCG, after 5 minutes or 1 hour after UV irradiation, respectively. There was no significance between the time to the administration of EGCG and the survival rate of cells (P=0.129).


Protective effects of epigallocatechin gallate after UV irradiation of cultured human lens epithelial cells.

Heo J, Lee BR, Koh JW - Korean J Ophthalmol (2008)

Lens epithelial cell viability after UV irradiation. Cell viability of cultured human lens epithelial cells after UV irradiation was markedly increased with Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) administration group and was increased dose-dependent way. Basis (0) was group with UV irradiation without administration of EGCG. There was no significance between the time to administration of EGCG and the survival rate of cells (P=0.129). (A) 5 minutes after UV irradiation, (B) 1 hour after UV irradiation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2629900&req=5

Figure 3: Lens epithelial cell viability after UV irradiation. Cell viability of cultured human lens epithelial cells after UV irradiation was markedly increased with Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) administration group and was increased dose-dependent way. Basis (0) was group with UV irradiation without administration of EGCG. There was no significance between the time to administration of EGCG and the survival rate of cells (P=0.129). (A) 5 minutes after UV irradiation, (B) 1 hour after UV irradiation.
Mentions: Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) protected cultured human lens epithelial cells from oxidative-stress-induced cytotoxicity with excellent efficacy. Compared with unirradiated cells (Fig. 1A), exposure to UV irradiation without administration of EGCG resulted in significant cell loss (Fig. 1B). With administration of 100 µM EGCG, both 5 minutes (Fig. 1C) and 1 hour (Fig. 1D) after UV irradiation, the cell count increased to those seen in unirradiated cells. The cell count of cultured human lens epithelial cells after UV irradiation markedly increased upon EGCG administration (Fig. 2). There was no significant relationship between the time to EGCG administration and cell loss (P=0.719). Cell viability after UV irradiation increased in a dose-dependent manner upon treatment with EGCG, as determined by the MTT assay (Fig. 3). Also, there were significant differences in viability between cells treated with 5 or 10 µM (P=0.000) and 10 or 15 µM EGCG (P=0.000). There was no significant difference between cells treated with 0 or 5 µM EGCG (P=0.233) or between cells treated with 15, 25, 50, or 100 µM EGCG (P=0.166). Compared with untreated cells, viability increased by approximately 24.8% or 21.5% in cells treated with 100 µM of EGCG, after 5 minutes or 1 hour after UV irradiation, respectively. There was no significance between the time to the administration of EGCG and the survival rate of cells (P=0.129).

Bottom Line: We irradiated cultured human lens epithelial cells with a 30-second pulse from a UV lamp with an irradiance of 0.6 mW/cm2.The cell number was measured with a microscopic counting chamber and cell viability was evaluated using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay.In a dose-dependent manner, viability was also higher in EGCG-treated cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate the protective effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) against UV irradiation of cultured human lens epithelial cells.

Methods: We irradiated cultured human lens epithelial cells with a 30-second pulse from a UV lamp with an irradiance of 0.6 mW/cm2. Five minutes and 1 hour after UV irradiation, we administered 0, 5, 10, 15, 25, 50, or 100 uM EGCG. The cell number was measured with a microscopic counting chamber and cell viability was evaluated using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay.

Results: Compared to untreated cells, the total number of cultured human lens epithelial cells was markedly higher after UV irradiation. In a dose-dependent manner, viability was also higher in EGCG-treated cells.

Conclusions: EGCG increased the cell count and cell viability after UV irradiation of cultured human lens epithelial cells, indicating that EGCG can protect lens epithelium against UV damage.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus