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Protective effects of epigallocatechin gallate after UV irradiation in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

Yang SW, Lee BR, Koh JW - Korean J Ophthalmol (2007)

Bottom Line: After 5 minutes and 1 hour, we administered different concentrations of EGCG (0, 5, 10, 15, 25, 50, 100 uM).The cell count was determined under a microscope using a counting chamber and the cell activity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay.The administration of EGCG increased the cell count and the cell activity after UV irradiation in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells; this suggests that EGCG provided protection against UV damage in cultured human retinal pigmented epithelial cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate the protective effects of Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) against UV irradiation in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells.

Methods: UV irradiation was produced by a UV lamp for 30 seconds with an irradiance of 3.3 mW/cm2. After 5 minutes and 1 hour, we administered different concentrations of EGCG (0, 5, 10, 15, 25, 50, 100 uM). The cell count was determined under a microscope using a counting chamber and the cell activity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay.

Results: The cell count of cultured human RPE cells after UV irradiation was markedly increased in the EGCG administration group, compared with the non-administrated group. The cell activity of the cultured human RPE cells after UV irradiation was markedly increased in the EGCG administration group and was increased in a dose-dependent way as determined by the MTT assay.

Conclusions: The administration of EGCG increased the cell count and the cell activity after UV irradiation in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells; this suggests that EGCG provided protection against UV damage in cultured human retinal pigmented epithelial cells.

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RPE cells count after UV irradiation. The cell count of cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells after UV irradiation was markedly increased in the Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) administration group, compared with that of the group not receiving EGCG.. The control group did not receive UV irradiation. There was no significant relationship between the time of administrating EGCG and the loss of cells (P=0.279). A: 5 minutes after UV irradiation, B: 1 hour after UV irradiation.
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Figure 2: RPE cells count after UV irradiation. The cell count of cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells after UV irradiation was markedly increased in the Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) administration group, compared with that of the group not receiving EGCG.. The control group did not receive UV irradiation. There was no significant relationship between the time of administrating EGCG and the loss of cells (P=0.279). A: 5 minutes after UV irradiation, B: 1 hour after UV irradiation.

Mentions: Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) effectively protected cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from oxidative-stress-induced cytotoxicity. Compared with the control group, which was not exposed to UV irradiation (Fig. 1A), exposure to UV irradiation without administration of EGCG showed significant cell loss (Fig. 1B). Another group to which 100 µM EGCG was administered 5 minutes (Fig. 1C) and 1 hour (Fig. 1D) after UV irradiation, experienced an increased cell count compared with that of the control group. The cell count of cultured human RPE cells after UV irradiation was markedly increased in the EGCG administration group, compared with the group that did not receive EGCG (Fig. 2). There was no significant relationship between the time to administration of EGCG and cell loss (P=0.279). Cell activity of the cultured human RPE cells after UV irradiation was markedly increased with EGCG administration, and it increased in a dose-dependent way, as determined by the MTT assay (Fig. 3). Within the group recieving EGCG, significant differences were shown between 5 µM (Mean=8.00±3.630) and 10 µM (M=25.83±5.399) and between 10 µM (M=25.83±5.399) and 15 µM (M=58.90±4.623) (P<0.001). There were no significant differences between 0 µM (M=0.00±0.000) and 5 µM (M=8.00±3.630) (P=0.260) among 15 µM (M=58.90±4.623), 25 µM (M=61.27±5.206), 50 µM (M=63.30±1.871), and 100 µM (M=68.10±5.229) (P=0.072). In comparison with the group that did not receive EGCG, cell activity was increased by approximately 43.9%, 68.1% respectively in 100 µM of the EGCG administration group. Moreover, post-treatment of RPE cells with EGCG (100 µM) after 1 hour showed significantly reduced cell deaths as a result of UV irradiation. There was a significant relationship between the time to administration of EGCG and cell activity (P=0.001).


Protective effects of epigallocatechin gallate after UV irradiation in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

Yang SW, Lee BR, Koh JW - Korean J Ophthalmol (2007)

RPE cells count after UV irradiation. The cell count of cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells after UV irradiation was markedly increased in the Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) administration group, compared with that of the group not receiving EGCG.. The control group did not receive UV irradiation. There was no significant relationship between the time of administrating EGCG and the loss of cells (P=0.279). A: 5 minutes after UV irradiation, B: 1 hour after UV irradiation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2629889&req=5

Figure 2: RPE cells count after UV irradiation. The cell count of cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells after UV irradiation was markedly increased in the Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) administration group, compared with that of the group not receiving EGCG.. The control group did not receive UV irradiation. There was no significant relationship between the time of administrating EGCG and the loss of cells (P=0.279). A: 5 minutes after UV irradiation, B: 1 hour after UV irradiation.
Mentions: Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) effectively protected cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from oxidative-stress-induced cytotoxicity. Compared with the control group, which was not exposed to UV irradiation (Fig. 1A), exposure to UV irradiation without administration of EGCG showed significant cell loss (Fig. 1B). Another group to which 100 µM EGCG was administered 5 minutes (Fig. 1C) and 1 hour (Fig. 1D) after UV irradiation, experienced an increased cell count compared with that of the control group. The cell count of cultured human RPE cells after UV irradiation was markedly increased in the EGCG administration group, compared with the group that did not receive EGCG (Fig. 2). There was no significant relationship between the time to administration of EGCG and cell loss (P=0.279). Cell activity of the cultured human RPE cells after UV irradiation was markedly increased with EGCG administration, and it increased in a dose-dependent way, as determined by the MTT assay (Fig. 3). Within the group recieving EGCG, significant differences were shown between 5 µM (Mean=8.00±3.630) and 10 µM (M=25.83±5.399) and between 10 µM (M=25.83±5.399) and 15 µM (M=58.90±4.623) (P<0.001). There were no significant differences between 0 µM (M=0.00±0.000) and 5 µM (M=8.00±3.630) (P=0.260) among 15 µM (M=58.90±4.623), 25 µM (M=61.27±5.206), 50 µM (M=63.30±1.871), and 100 µM (M=68.10±5.229) (P=0.072). In comparison with the group that did not receive EGCG, cell activity was increased by approximately 43.9%, 68.1% respectively in 100 µM of the EGCG administration group. Moreover, post-treatment of RPE cells with EGCG (100 µM) after 1 hour showed significantly reduced cell deaths as a result of UV irradiation. There was a significant relationship between the time to administration of EGCG and cell activity (P=0.001).

Bottom Line: After 5 minutes and 1 hour, we administered different concentrations of EGCG (0, 5, 10, 15, 25, 50, 100 uM).The cell count was determined under a microscope using a counting chamber and the cell activity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay.The administration of EGCG increased the cell count and the cell activity after UV irradiation in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells; this suggests that EGCG provided protection against UV damage in cultured human retinal pigmented epithelial cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate the protective effects of Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) against UV irradiation in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells.

Methods: UV irradiation was produced by a UV lamp for 30 seconds with an irradiance of 3.3 mW/cm2. After 5 minutes and 1 hour, we administered different concentrations of EGCG (0, 5, 10, 15, 25, 50, 100 uM). The cell count was determined under a microscope using a counting chamber and the cell activity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay.

Results: The cell count of cultured human RPE cells after UV irradiation was markedly increased in the EGCG administration group, compared with the non-administrated group. The cell activity of the cultured human RPE cells after UV irradiation was markedly increased in the EGCG administration group and was increased in a dose-dependent way as determined by the MTT assay.

Conclusions: The administration of EGCG increased the cell count and the cell activity after UV irradiation in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells; this suggests that EGCG provided protection against UV damage in cultured human retinal pigmented epithelial cells.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus