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Feedback system protects inner ear.

Robinson R - PLoS Biol. (2009)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

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Rock ‘n’ roll sounds best turned up loud, but as hundreds of aging rockers (and millions of their aging fans) are discovering, the cost of all that glorious noise is hearing loss and tinnitus... These incoming neurons fire in response to loud noises, releasing the neurotransmitter acetylcholine... This molecule binds to receptors on the outer hair cells, reducing their ability to change in length, thereby diminishing fluid vibration and cochlear amplification... In mice, they found that the mutant receptors reduced the amplification ability of the hair cells, thereby diminishing the cochlea's sensitivity... This ability could be restored by specifically blocking the acetylcholine receptor with the poison strychnine, indicating that the mutant's effect was directly tied to its altered response to the incoming neuronal signal... Compared to wild-type mice, mice bearing the mutant receptor were protected against noise known to induce permanent hearing loss... Because the mutation introduced no new function, but only exaggerated the existing action of the feedback system, the authors conclude that the normal function of the system included protecting the inner ear from noise-induced damage... Loud noise causes permanent hearing loss by killing hair cells... These cells cannot be regenerated, and the current findings do not alter that... They do, however, strongly point to outer hair cells, and specifically their acetylcholine receptors, as targets to protect remaining hearing ability... Developing drugs that mimic the effect of the mutation—leading to more sustained receptor opening—would be an obvious first step.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

High-intensity sounds produce permanent damage to the inner ear, resulting in two main pathologies: hearing loss and tinnitus.
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pbio-1000012-g001: High-intensity sounds produce permanent damage to the inner ear, resulting in two main pathologies: hearing loss and tinnitus.


Feedback system protects inner ear.

Robinson R - PLoS Biol. (2009)

High-intensity sounds produce permanent damage to the inner ear, resulting in two main pathologies: hearing loss and tinnitus.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2628403&req=5

pbio-1000012-g001: High-intensity sounds produce permanent damage to the inner ear, resulting in two main pathologies: hearing loss and tinnitus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Rock ‘n’ roll sounds best turned up loud, but as hundreds of aging rockers (and millions of their aging fans) are discovering, the cost of all that glorious noise is hearing loss and tinnitus... These incoming neurons fire in response to loud noises, releasing the neurotransmitter acetylcholine... This molecule binds to receptors on the outer hair cells, reducing their ability to change in length, thereby diminishing fluid vibration and cochlear amplification... In mice, they found that the mutant receptors reduced the amplification ability of the hair cells, thereby diminishing the cochlea's sensitivity... This ability could be restored by specifically blocking the acetylcholine receptor with the poison strychnine, indicating that the mutant's effect was directly tied to its altered response to the incoming neuronal signal... Compared to wild-type mice, mice bearing the mutant receptor were protected against noise known to induce permanent hearing loss... Because the mutation introduced no new function, but only exaggerated the existing action of the feedback system, the authors conclude that the normal function of the system included protecting the inner ear from noise-induced damage... Loud noise causes permanent hearing loss by killing hair cells... These cells cannot be regenerated, and the current findings do not alter that... They do, however, strongly point to outer hair cells, and specifically their acetylcholine receptors, as targets to protect remaining hearing ability... Developing drugs that mimic the effect of the mutation—leading to more sustained receptor opening—would be an obvious first step.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus