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Serum ferritin and metal levels as risk factors for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

Qureshi M, Brown RH, Rogers JT, Cudkowicz ME - Open Neurol J (2008)

Bottom Line: We found that hair lead levels and serum ferritin levels were elevated in ALS patients compared to published normal values.Metal levels of arsenic, lead, mercury, cadmium, thallium, cobalt and aluminum in 24-hour urine specimens and lead, mercury and arsenic in serum were within the normal range.We conclude that twenty-four hour urine or blood testing for metals is not warranted as part of the evaluation of ALS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neurology Clinical Trials Unit; Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA, 02129, USA. mqureshi@partners.org

ABSTRACT
Metal toxicity has been identified as a possible risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other neurodegenerative disorders. We conducted a retrospective chart review of urinary, hair and blood metal levels and serum ferritin in 321 people with ALS seen over a ten-year period at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). We found that hair lead levels and serum ferritin levels were elevated in ALS patients compared to published normal values. Metal levels of arsenic, lead, mercury, cadmium, thallium, cobalt and aluminum in 24-hour urine specimens and lead, mercury and arsenic in serum were within the normal range. We conclude that twenty-four hour urine or blood testing for metals is not warranted as part of the evaluation of ALS. Elevated levels of serum ferritin in ALS population could reflect an underlying perturbation in iron metabolism.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The mean serum ferritin level in 13 female participants with ALS (183.5 ng/ml ± 186.93 SD) and 16 female controls (71.3 ng/ml ± 60.37 SD) is depicted in boxplot. The horizontal line reflects the median and the box provides the interquartile range from the 25th to 75th percentile. Dots represent the observations outside of 10th and 90th percentiles.
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Figure 2: The mean serum ferritin level in 13 female participants with ALS (183.5 ng/ml ± 186.93 SD) and 16 female controls (71.3 ng/ml ± 60.37 SD) is depicted in boxplot. The horizontal line reflects the median and the box provides the interquartile range from the 25th to 75th percentile. Dots represent the observations outside of 10th and 90th percentiles.

Mentions: Based on these results we conducted additional analysis of serum ferritin levels in 30 individuals with ALS and 30 healthy controls. Compared with the healthy controls, the mean serum ferritin level in the ALS population was higher (ANOVA: males p=0.037, females p=0.032). The mean serum ferritin level in the 17 males with ALS was 269.9 ng/ml (± 126.4 SD), compared to 164.1 ng/ml (± 142.2 SD) in 14 healthy controls. The mean serum ferritin value in 13 females with ALS was 183.5 ng/ml (± 186.9 SD) compared to 71.3 ng/ml (± 60.4 SD) in 16 female control subjects (Figs. 1 and 2).


Serum ferritin and metal levels as risk factors for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

Qureshi M, Brown RH, Rogers JT, Cudkowicz ME - Open Neurol J (2008)

The mean serum ferritin level in 13 female participants with ALS (183.5 ng/ml ± 186.93 SD) and 16 female controls (71.3 ng/ml ± 60.37 SD) is depicted in boxplot. The horizontal line reflects the median and the box provides the interquartile range from the 25th to 75th percentile. Dots represent the observations outside of 10th and 90th percentiles.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2627516&req=5

Figure 2: The mean serum ferritin level in 13 female participants with ALS (183.5 ng/ml ± 186.93 SD) and 16 female controls (71.3 ng/ml ± 60.37 SD) is depicted in boxplot. The horizontal line reflects the median and the box provides the interquartile range from the 25th to 75th percentile. Dots represent the observations outside of 10th and 90th percentiles.
Mentions: Based on these results we conducted additional analysis of serum ferritin levels in 30 individuals with ALS and 30 healthy controls. Compared with the healthy controls, the mean serum ferritin level in the ALS population was higher (ANOVA: males p=0.037, females p=0.032). The mean serum ferritin level in the 17 males with ALS was 269.9 ng/ml (± 126.4 SD), compared to 164.1 ng/ml (± 142.2 SD) in 14 healthy controls. The mean serum ferritin value in 13 females with ALS was 183.5 ng/ml (± 186.9 SD) compared to 71.3 ng/ml (± 60.4 SD) in 16 female control subjects (Figs. 1 and 2).

Bottom Line: We found that hair lead levels and serum ferritin levels were elevated in ALS patients compared to published normal values.Metal levels of arsenic, lead, mercury, cadmium, thallium, cobalt and aluminum in 24-hour urine specimens and lead, mercury and arsenic in serum were within the normal range.We conclude that twenty-four hour urine or blood testing for metals is not warranted as part of the evaluation of ALS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neurology Clinical Trials Unit; Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA, 02129, USA. mqureshi@partners.org

ABSTRACT
Metal toxicity has been identified as a possible risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other neurodegenerative disorders. We conducted a retrospective chart review of urinary, hair and blood metal levels and serum ferritin in 321 people with ALS seen over a ten-year period at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). We found that hair lead levels and serum ferritin levels were elevated in ALS patients compared to published normal values. Metal levels of arsenic, lead, mercury, cadmium, thallium, cobalt and aluminum in 24-hour urine specimens and lead, mercury and arsenic in serum were within the normal range. We conclude that twenty-four hour urine or blood testing for metals is not warranted as part of the evaluation of ALS. Elevated levels of serum ferritin in ALS population could reflect an underlying perturbation in iron metabolism.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus