Limits...
Awareness and attitudes about HIV among pregnant women in Aksu, northwest China.

Maimaiti R, Andersson R - Open AIDS J (2008)

Bottom Line: Local sex workers were also found to be positive in 1998.A total of 291 pregnant women participated.Obviously, it is important to design HIV information strategies that target pregnant women in north-western China.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Child Preventive Care Department of First Affiliated Hospital, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi, and Xinjiang, China.

ABSTRACT
The Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region has a firmly established HIV epidemic among its intravenous drug user (IDU) population. Local sex workers were also found to be positive in 1998. A descriptive, cross-sectional survey of knowledge about HIV/AIDS and attitudes among consecutively selected pregnant women was conducted November 2005 in Aksu Prefecture, north-western China, with a population on 2 million with about 25 000 pregnancies per year. A total of 291 pregnant women participated. We found a limited knowledge on mother-to child transmission with several misconceptions. The AIDS campaigns have been successful in making all the women aware of HIV as a sexually transmitted disease. However, the common belief that social contact causes transmission gives a high risk that patients are stigmatized. Obviously, it is important to design HIV information strategies that target pregnant women in north-western China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Reported first information among 291 pregnant women about HIV/AIDS.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2627515&req=5

Figure 1: Reported first information among 291 pregnant women about HIV/AIDS.

Mentions: The women were asked if they had heard about the sickness called HIV or AIDS and in the Uyghur group, 87% answered that they had and 10% that they had not, 3% did not answer the question. In the Han Chinese group, 74% answered that they had and 19% that they had not, 7% did not answer. Seventy-seven percent of the Uyghur group and 65% of the Han Chinese group had first heard about HIV in the media (Fig. 1).


Awareness and attitudes about HIV among pregnant women in Aksu, northwest China.

Maimaiti R, Andersson R - Open AIDS J (2008)

Reported first information among 291 pregnant women about HIV/AIDS.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2627515&req=5

Figure 1: Reported first information among 291 pregnant women about HIV/AIDS.
Mentions: The women were asked if they had heard about the sickness called HIV or AIDS and in the Uyghur group, 87% answered that they had and 10% that they had not, 3% did not answer the question. In the Han Chinese group, 74% answered that they had and 19% that they had not, 7% did not answer. Seventy-seven percent of the Uyghur group and 65% of the Han Chinese group had first heard about HIV in the media (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: Local sex workers were also found to be positive in 1998.A total of 291 pregnant women participated.Obviously, it is important to design HIV information strategies that target pregnant women in north-western China.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Child Preventive Care Department of First Affiliated Hospital, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi, and Xinjiang, China.

ABSTRACT
The Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region has a firmly established HIV epidemic among its intravenous drug user (IDU) population. Local sex workers were also found to be positive in 1998. A descriptive, cross-sectional survey of knowledge about HIV/AIDS and attitudes among consecutively selected pregnant women was conducted November 2005 in Aksu Prefecture, north-western China, with a population on 2 million with about 25 000 pregnancies per year. A total of 291 pregnant women participated. We found a limited knowledge on mother-to child transmission with several misconceptions. The AIDS campaigns have been successful in making all the women aware of HIV as a sexually transmitted disease. However, the common belief that social contact causes transmission gives a high risk that patients are stigmatized. Obviously, it is important to design HIV information strategies that target pregnant women in north-western China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus