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Awareness and attitudes about HIV among pregnant women in Aksu, northwest China.

Maimaiti R, Andersson R - Open AIDS J (2008)

Bottom Line: Local sex workers were also found to be positive in 1998.We found a limited knowledge on mother-to child transmission with several misconceptions.The AIDS campaigns have been successful in making all the women aware of HIV as a sexually transmitted disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Child Preventive Care Department of First Affiliated Hospital, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi, and Xinjiang, China.

ABSTRACT
The Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region has a firmly established HIV epidemic among its intravenous drug user (IDU) population. Local sex workers were also found to be positive in 1998. A descriptive, cross-sectional survey of knowledge about HIV/AIDS and attitudes among consecutively selected pregnant women was conducted November 2005 in Aksu Prefecture, north-western China, with a population on 2 million with about 25 000 pregnancies per year. A total of 291 pregnant women participated. We found a limited knowledge on mother-to child transmission with several misconceptions. The AIDS campaigns have been successful in making all the women aware of HIV as a sexually transmitted disease. However, the common belief that social contact causes transmission gives a high risk that patients are stigmatized. Obviously, it is important to design HIV information strategies that target pregnant women in north-western China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Reported first information among 291 pregnant women about HIV/AIDS.
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Figure 1: Reported first information among 291 pregnant women about HIV/AIDS.

Mentions: The women were asked if they had heard about the sickness called HIV or AIDS and in the Uyghur group, 87% answered that they had and 10% that they had not, 3% did not answer the question. In the Han Chinese group, 74% answered that they had and 19% that they had not, 7% did not answer. Seventy-seven percent of the Uyghur group and 65% of the Han Chinese group had first heard about HIV in the media (Fig. 1).


Awareness and attitudes about HIV among pregnant women in Aksu, northwest China.

Maimaiti R, Andersson R - Open AIDS J (2008)

Reported first information among 291 pregnant women about HIV/AIDS.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2627515&req=5

Figure 1: Reported first information among 291 pregnant women about HIV/AIDS.
Mentions: The women were asked if they had heard about the sickness called HIV or AIDS and in the Uyghur group, 87% answered that they had and 10% that they had not, 3% did not answer the question. In the Han Chinese group, 74% answered that they had and 19% that they had not, 7% did not answer. Seventy-seven percent of the Uyghur group and 65% of the Han Chinese group had first heard about HIV in the media (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: Local sex workers were also found to be positive in 1998.We found a limited knowledge on mother-to child transmission with several misconceptions.The AIDS campaigns have been successful in making all the women aware of HIV as a sexually transmitted disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Child Preventive Care Department of First Affiliated Hospital, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi, and Xinjiang, China.

ABSTRACT
The Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region has a firmly established HIV epidemic among its intravenous drug user (IDU) population. Local sex workers were also found to be positive in 1998. A descriptive, cross-sectional survey of knowledge about HIV/AIDS and attitudes among consecutively selected pregnant women was conducted November 2005 in Aksu Prefecture, north-western China, with a population on 2 million with about 25 000 pregnancies per year. A total of 291 pregnant women participated. We found a limited knowledge on mother-to child transmission with several misconceptions. The AIDS campaigns have been successful in making all the women aware of HIV as a sexually transmitted disease. However, the common belief that social contact causes transmission gives a high risk that patients are stigmatized. Obviously, it is important to design HIV information strategies that target pregnant women in north-western China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus