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Use of standardized, quantitative digital photography in a multicenter Web-based study.

Molnar JA, Lew WK, Rapp DA, Gordon ES, Voignier D, Rushing S, Willner W - Eplasty (2009)

Bottom Line: Digital photography is a simple and cost-effective method for quantifying wound size when used in conjunction with digital planimetry (SigmaScan) and photo enhancement (Adobe Photoshop) programs.The accuracy of the SigmaScan program in calculating predetermined areas was within 4.7% (95% CI, 3.4%-5.9%).Images obtained by individuals denying experience in photography proved reliable and useful for clinical evaluation and quantification of wound area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA. jmolnar@wfubmc.edu

ABSTRACT

Objective: We developed a Web-based, blinded, prospective, randomized, multicenter trial, using standardized digital photography to clinically evaluate hand burn depth and accurately determine wound area with digital planimetry.

Methods: Photos in each center were taken with identical digital cameras with standardized settings on a custom backdrop developed at Wake Forest University containing a gray, white, black, and centimeter scale. The images were downloaded, transferred via the Web, and stored on servers at the principal investigator's home institution. Color adjustments to each photo were made using Adobe Photoshop 6.0 (Adobe, San Jose, Calif). In an initial pilot study, model hands marked with circles of known areas were used to determine the accuracy of the planimetry technique. Two-dimensional digital planimetry using SigmaScan Pro 5.0 (SPSS Science, Chicago, Ill) was used to calculate wound area from the digital images.

Results: Digital photography is a simple and cost-effective method for quantifying wound size when used in conjunction with digital planimetry (SigmaScan) and photo enhancement (Adobe Photoshop) programs. The accuracy of the SigmaScan program in calculating predetermined areas was within 4.7% (95% CI, 3.4%-5.9%). Dorsal hand burns of the initial 20 patients in a national study involving several centers were evaluated with this technique. Images obtained by individuals denying experience in photography proved reliable and useful for clinical evaluation and quantification of wound area.

Conclusion: Standardized digital photography may be used quantitatively in a Web-based, multicenter trial of burn care. This technique could be modified for other medical studies with visual endpoints.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Digital image quality of a clinical image from the prospective multicenter                        trial before (left figure) and after (right figure) adjustment with Adobe                        Photoshop.
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Figure 3: Digital image quality of a clinical image from the prospective multicenter trial before (left figure) and after (right figure) adjustment with Adobe Photoshop.

Mentions: Digital images were evaluated on a 21-in Trinitron monitor (Sony Corporation, New York), calibrated with OptiCAL 3.5 (Pantone, Lawrenceville, NJ). Adobe Photoshop 6.0 (Adobe, San Jose, Calif) was used to compensate for any exposure or color differences found in the original digital files (Fig 3). Exposure and color corrections were made by setting a white point from a white area on the reference backdrop (image/adjust/levels/white eyedropper). Color was further refined by using the gray eyedropper to color neutralize the 18% gray portion of the reference backdrop (image/adjust/levels/gray eyedropper). In both cases, the eyedropper tool was set to sample a 5 × 5-pixel area.


Use of standardized, quantitative digital photography in a multicenter Web-based study.

Molnar JA, Lew WK, Rapp DA, Gordon ES, Voignier D, Rushing S, Willner W - Eplasty (2009)

Digital image quality of a clinical image from the prospective multicenter                        trial before (left figure) and after (right figure) adjustment with Adobe                        Photoshop.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2627310&req=5

Figure 3: Digital image quality of a clinical image from the prospective multicenter trial before (left figure) and after (right figure) adjustment with Adobe Photoshop.
Mentions: Digital images were evaluated on a 21-in Trinitron monitor (Sony Corporation, New York), calibrated with OptiCAL 3.5 (Pantone, Lawrenceville, NJ). Adobe Photoshop 6.0 (Adobe, San Jose, Calif) was used to compensate for any exposure or color differences found in the original digital files (Fig 3). Exposure and color corrections were made by setting a white point from a white area on the reference backdrop (image/adjust/levels/white eyedropper). Color was further refined by using the gray eyedropper to color neutralize the 18% gray portion of the reference backdrop (image/adjust/levels/gray eyedropper). In both cases, the eyedropper tool was set to sample a 5 × 5-pixel area.

Bottom Line: Digital photography is a simple and cost-effective method for quantifying wound size when used in conjunction with digital planimetry (SigmaScan) and photo enhancement (Adobe Photoshop) programs.The accuracy of the SigmaScan program in calculating predetermined areas was within 4.7% (95% CI, 3.4%-5.9%).Images obtained by individuals denying experience in photography proved reliable and useful for clinical evaluation and quantification of wound area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA. jmolnar@wfubmc.edu

ABSTRACT

Objective: We developed a Web-based, blinded, prospective, randomized, multicenter trial, using standardized digital photography to clinically evaluate hand burn depth and accurately determine wound area with digital planimetry.

Methods: Photos in each center were taken with identical digital cameras with standardized settings on a custom backdrop developed at Wake Forest University containing a gray, white, black, and centimeter scale. The images were downloaded, transferred via the Web, and stored on servers at the principal investigator's home institution. Color adjustments to each photo were made using Adobe Photoshop 6.0 (Adobe, San Jose, Calif). In an initial pilot study, model hands marked with circles of known areas were used to determine the accuracy of the planimetry technique. Two-dimensional digital planimetry using SigmaScan Pro 5.0 (SPSS Science, Chicago, Ill) was used to calculate wound area from the digital images.

Results: Digital photography is a simple and cost-effective method for quantifying wound size when used in conjunction with digital planimetry (SigmaScan) and photo enhancement (Adobe Photoshop) programs. The accuracy of the SigmaScan program in calculating predetermined areas was within 4.7% (95% CI, 3.4%-5.9%). Dorsal hand burns of the initial 20 patients in a national study involving several centers were evaluated with this technique. Images obtained by individuals denying experience in photography proved reliable and useful for clinical evaluation and quantification of wound area.

Conclusion: Standardized digital photography may be used quantitatively in a Web-based, multicenter trial of burn care. This technique could be modified for other medical studies with visual endpoints.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus