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Case report: feminizing the male face.

Shams MG, Motamedi MH - Eplasty (2009)

Bottom Line: Although changing the hairdo or makeup, and depilation, give satisfying cosmetic results in many patients, hard and soft tissue facial surgeries are needed in most cases.Various amounts of soft and hard tissue changes were required for individual patients and were tailored for each case according to the preoperative workup and standard parameters.All 10 patients were satisfied with their improvement in appearance; the degree of impact these procedures may have on lifestyle remains to be assessed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of OMF Surgery, Baqiyatallah Medical Center, Baqiyatallah Medical Sciences University, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran

ABSTRACT

Objective: Sex reassignment surgery is accepted in properly planned cases to change facial appearance in accordance with a new gender. Although changing the hairdo or makeup, and depilation, give satisfying cosmetic results in many patients, hard and soft tissue facial surgeries are needed in most cases. Unfortunately, few studies on facial corrections have been published and feminizing a male face is still considered an arbitrary undertaking. We present a useful surgical protocol to feminize the male face.

Method: Ten male-to-female transsexuals aged 20 to 32 years (average 23 years) were referred after gender reassigning for facial feminization (1990-2007). Clinical examination of the patients revealed variable degrees of common masculine features such as long square faces, broad chins, excessive projection, frontal bossing, prominent flaring gonial angles, high hairlines, and low-set eyebrows. After complete clinical assessment and paraclinical workup including cephalometry, the patients were admitted for feminizing surgery. The face was outlined in geometric proportions. It was aimed to round the male face using a sequence of staged surgical procedures for both hard and soft tissues.

Results: Ten male patients aged 20 to 32 years (average 23 years) underwent facial feminization using basic surgical guidelines. Various amounts of soft and hard tissue changes were required for individual patients and were tailored for each case according to the preoperative workup and standard parameters.

Conclusion: All 10 patients were satisfied with their improvement in appearance; the degree of impact these procedures may have on lifestyle remains to be assessed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Lateral view of the patient. Note the long face, square chin, flared mandibular angles, and masculine features.
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Figure 2: Lateral view of the patient. Note the long face, square chin, flared mandibular angles, and masculine features.

Mentions: Ten male-to-female transsexuals aged 20 to 32 years (average 23 years) were referred for gender-reassigning facial surgery and feminization from 1990 to 2007. Clinical examination in these patients revealed variable degrees of common masculine features such as long square faces and broad chins with excessive projection, frontal bossing, prominent flaring gonial angles with high hairlines and low-set eyebrows (Figs 1 and 2). After complete clinical assessment of the patients and paraclinical workup including cephalometric radiography and tracing, the patients were admitted for feminizing surgery. The standard procedures we used for feminization were as follows: to feminize the jaw, first under general anesthesia via a nasoendotracheal intubation, an intraoral degloving vestibular incision was made from left to right retromolar pads. After reflection of the mucoperiosteum and tunneling under the mental nerves, genioplasty setback and vertical reduction were performed. Then, the flared gonial angles were shaved laterally and rounded inferiorly using rotary instruments. Next, lateral and inferior cortical shaving of the entire mandible was performed to conform to the chin. Bilateral osteotomies of the zygoma and advancement were also done. Several months later, rhinoplasty was performed. In addition, through an incision in the hairline, undermining of the scalp, a 1.5- to 2.5-cm strip of skin was excised. Afterwards, supraorbital rim contouring with subcutaneous fat removal of the forehead, frontal bossing shaving, eyebrow lifting, and hairline lowering was performed. Later, facial hair removal was done using a laser (Figs 3 and 4).


Case report: feminizing the male face.

Shams MG, Motamedi MH - Eplasty (2009)

Lateral view of the patient. Note the long face, square chin, flared mandibular angles, and masculine features.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2627308&req=5

Figure 2: Lateral view of the patient. Note the long face, square chin, flared mandibular angles, and masculine features.
Mentions: Ten male-to-female transsexuals aged 20 to 32 years (average 23 years) were referred for gender-reassigning facial surgery and feminization from 1990 to 2007. Clinical examination in these patients revealed variable degrees of common masculine features such as long square faces and broad chins with excessive projection, frontal bossing, prominent flaring gonial angles with high hairlines and low-set eyebrows (Figs 1 and 2). After complete clinical assessment of the patients and paraclinical workup including cephalometric radiography and tracing, the patients were admitted for feminizing surgery. The standard procedures we used for feminization were as follows: to feminize the jaw, first under general anesthesia via a nasoendotracheal intubation, an intraoral degloving vestibular incision was made from left to right retromolar pads. After reflection of the mucoperiosteum and tunneling under the mental nerves, genioplasty setback and vertical reduction were performed. Then, the flared gonial angles were shaved laterally and rounded inferiorly using rotary instruments. Next, lateral and inferior cortical shaving of the entire mandible was performed to conform to the chin. Bilateral osteotomies of the zygoma and advancement were also done. Several months later, rhinoplasty was performed. In addition, through an incision in the hairline, undermining of the scalp, a 1.5- to 2.5-cm strip of skin was excised. Afterwards, supraorbital rim contouring with subcutaneous fat removal of the forehead, frontal bossing shaving, eyebrow lifting, and hairline lowering was performed. Later, facial hair removal was done using a laser (Figs 3 and 4).

Bottom Line: Although changing the hairdo or makeup, and depilation, give satisfying cosmetic results in many patients, hard and soft tissue facial surgeries are needed in most cases.Various amounts of soft and hard tissue changes were required for individual patients and were tailored for each case according to the preoperative workup and standard parameters.All 10 patients were satisfied with their improvement in appearance; the degree of impact these procedures may have on lifestyle remains to be assessed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of OMF Surgery, Baqiyatallah Medical Center, Baqiyatallah Medical Sciences University, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran

ABSTRACT

Objective: Sex reassignment surgery is accepted in properly planned cases to change facial appearance in accordance with a new gender. Although changing the hairdo or makeup, and depilation, give satisfying cosmetic results in many patients, hard and soft tissue facial surgeries are needed in most cases. Unfortunately, few studies on facial corrections have been published and feminizing a male face is still considered an arbitrary undertaking. We present a useful surgical protocol to feminize the male face.

Method: Ten male-to-female transsexuals aged 20 to 32 years (average 23 years) were referred after gender reassigning for facial feminization (1990-2007). Clinical examination of the patients revealed variable degrees of common masculine features such as long square faces, broad chins, excessive projection, frontal bossing, prominent flaring gonial angles, high hairlines, and low-set eyebrows. After complete clinical assessment and paraclinical workup including cephalometry, the patients were admitted for feminizing surgery. The face was outlined in geometric proportions. It was aimed to round the male face using a sequence of staged surgical procedures for both hard and soft tissues.

Results: Ten male patients aged 20 to 32 years (average 23 years) underwent facial feminization using basic surgical guidelines. Various amounts of soft and hard tissue changes were required for individual patients and were tailored for each case according to the preoperative workup and standard parameters.

Conclusion: All 10 patients were satisfied with their improvement in appearance; the degree of impact these procedures may have on lifestyle remains to be assessed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus