Limits...
A human full-skin culture system for interventional studies.

Steinstraesser L, Rittig A, Gevers K, Sorkin M, Hirsch T, Kesting M, Sand M, Al-Benna S, Langer S, Steinau HU, Jacobsen F - Eplasty (2009)

Bottom Line: The aim of this study was to develop an effective surrogate model in which ex vivo full-thickness organ culture experiments may be performed.Transgene expression was demonstrated to be time dependent.This model chamber presents a convenient, easy-to-use, and robust model in which ex vivo full-thickness organ culture experiments may be performed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department for Plastic Surgery, Burn Center, BG University Hospital Bergmannsheil, Ruhr University Bochum, Bochum, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Novel approaches to bridge the gap between clinical studies and experimental basic research of skin physiology are urgently needed. The aim of this study was to develop an effective surrogate model in which ex vivo full-thickness organ culture experiments may be performed.

Methods: Human full skin from patients was placed into a stainless steel chamber and cultured at an air-liquid interphase for 4 weeks. Samples were evaluated every week by HE-staining and immunohistochemical characterization. Epidermal gene transfer kinetics was performed as an interventional study.

Results: This ex vivo chamber model maintained the physiologic and histologic properties of the skin explants for 4 weeks. This indicated the model's acceptable ex vivo physiologic validity. No epidermolysis was observed, and both basal lamina and blood vessels were detected within all tissue samples. Transgene expression was demonstrated to be time dependent.

Conclusion: This model chamber presents a convenient, easy-to-use, and robust model in which ex vivo full-thickness organ culture experiments may be performed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Laminin staining. The immunohistochemical staining of laminin (green) determined the existence of a basal lamina as an indication for the structural and functional stability of the epidermis. Furthermore, laminin staining was associated with remaining blood vessel structures. The upper layer represents the staining of epidermis, whereas the lower line demonstrates a representative staining of the dermis. Four-week follow-up (7, 14, 21, and 28 days) is shown from left to right. Control staining without using the antilaminin antibody is shown in the upper right margin of the corresponding image.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2627306&req=5

Figure 4: Laminin staining. The immunohistochemical staining of laminin (green) determined the existence of a basal lamina as an indication for the structural and functional stability of the epidermis. Furthermore, laminin staining was associated with remaining blood vessel structures. The upper layer represents the staining of epidermis, whereas the lower line demonstrates a representative staining of the dermis. Four-week follow-up (7, 14, 21, and 28 days) is shown from left to right. Control staining without using the antilaminin antibody is shown in the upper right margin of the corresponding image.

Mentions: The alteration in the relationship between the constant number of Ki-67-positive cells and the increased level of caspase-3-positive stained cells on the one hand and the growing allocation of proliferative cells within the epidermis on the other hand indicated the proceeding of tissue degradation. However, laminin labeling confirmed the presence of a basal lamina between the epidermis and the dermis within all sections analyzed (Fig 4). In addition, the number of detected blood vessels was not different in comparison with the 4-week follow-up; indicating the concomitance of vital endothelial cells. These findings demonstrated the structural and functional behaviors of the organ components within the cultured tissue section.


A human full-skin culture system for interventional studies.

Steinstraesser L, Rittig A, Gevers K, Sorkin M, Hirsch T, Kesting M, Sand M, Al-Benna S, Langer S, Steinau HU, Jacobsen F - Eplasty (2009)

Laminin staining. The immunohistochemical staining of laminin (green) determined the existence of a basal lamina as an indication for the structural and functional stability of the epidermis. Furthermore, laminin staining was associated with remaining blood vessel structures. The upper layer represents the staining of epidermis, whereas the lower line demonstrates a representative staining of the dermis. Four-week follow-up (7, 14, 21, and 28 days) is shown from left to right. Control staining without using the antilaminin antibody is shown in the upper right margin of the corresponding image.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2627306&req=5

Figure 4: Laminin staining. The immunohistochemical staining of laminin (green) determined the existence of a basal lamina as an indication for the structural and functional stability of the epidermis. Furthermore, laminin staining was associated with remaining blood vessel structures. The upper layer represents the staining of epidermis, whereas the lower line demonstrates a representative staining of the dermis. Four-week follow-up (7, 14, 21, and 28 days) is shown from left to right. Control staining without using the antilaminin antibody is shown in the upper right margin of the corresponding image.
Mentions: The alteration in the relationship between the constant number of Ki-67-positive cells and the increased level of caspase-3-positive stained cells on the one hand and the growing allocation of proliferative cells within the epidermis on the other hand indicated the proceeding of tissue degradation. However, laminin labeling confirmed the presence of a basal lamina between the epidermis and the dermis within all sections analyzed (Fig 4). In addition, the number of detected blood vessels was not different in comparison with the 4-week follow-up; indicating the concomitance of vital endothelial cells. These findings demonstrated the structural and functional behaviors of the organ components within the cultured tissue section.

Bottom Line: The aim of this study was to develop an effective surrogate model in which ex vivo full-thickness organ culture experiments may be performed.Transgene expression was demonstrated to be time dependent.This model chamber presents a convenient, easy-to-use, and robust model in which ex vivo full-thickness organ culture experiments may be performed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department for Plastic Surgery, Burn Center, BG University Hospital Bergmannsheil, Ruhr University Bochum, Bochum, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Novel approaches to bridge the gap between clinical studies and experimental basic research of skin physiology are urgently needed. The aim of this study was to develop an effective surrogate model in which ex vivo full-thickness organ culture experiments may be performed.

Methods: Human full skin from patients was placed into a stainless steel chamber and cultured at an air-liquid interphase for 4 weeks. Samples were evaluated every week by HE-staining and immunohistochemical characterization. Epidermal gene transfer kinetics was performed as an interventional study.

Results: This ex vivo chamber model maintained the physiologic and histologic properties of the skin explants for 4 weeks. This indicated the model's acceptable ex vivo physiologic validity. No epidermolysis was observed, and both basal lamina and blood vessels were detected within all tissue samples. Transgene expression was demonstrated to be time dependent.

Conclusion: This model chamber presents a convenient, easy-to-use, and robust model in which ex vivo full-thickness organ culture experiments may be performed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus