Limits...
A human full-skin culture system for interventional studies.

Steinstraesser L, Rittig A, Gevers K, Sorkin M, Hirsch T, Kesting M, Sand M, Al-Benna S, Langer S, Steinau HU, Jacobsen F - Eplasty (2009)

Bottom Line: The aim of this study was to develop an effective surrogate model in which ex vivo full-thickness organ culture experiments may be performed.Transgene expression was demonstrated to be time dependent.This model chamber presents a convenient, easy-to-use, and robust model in which ex vivo full-thickness organ culture experiments may be performed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department for Plastic Surgery, Burn Center, BG University Hospital Bergmannsheil, Ruhr University Bochum, Bochum, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Novel approaches to bridge the gap between clinical studies and experimental basic research of skin physiology are urgently needed. The aim of this study was to develop an effective surrogate model in which ex vivo full-thickness organ culture experiments may be performed.

Methods: Human full skin from patients was placed into a stainless steel chamber and cultured at an air-liquid interphase for 4 weeks. Samples were evaluated every week by HE-staining and immunohistochemical characterization. Epidermal gene transfer kinetics was performed as an interventional study.

Results: This ex vivo chamber model maintained the physiologic and histologic properties of the skin explants for 4 weeks. This indicated the model's acceptable ex vivo physiologic validity. No epidermolysis was observed, and both basal lamina and blood vessels were detected within all tissue samples. Transgene expression was demonstrated to be time dependent.

Conclusion: This model chamber presents a convenient, easy-to-use, and robust model in which ex vivo full-thickness organ culture experiments may be performed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Histological analysis. HE-stained cross-sections of skin tissue samples (a). Modification of the dermal structure was seen in the 4-week observation period. Spaces seen after 7 days were filled up with collagen matrix until day 28. Epidermal layer decreased continuously during the observation period. High-power field analysis of the sections demonstrating the amount of cells within the epidermis (b) and the dermis (c). No tissue necrosis was observed over the time course of 28 days. Images from 5-μm formalin fixed tissue sections at a 50-fold magnification.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2627306&req=5

Figure 1: Histological analysis. HE-stained cross-sections of skin tissue samples (a). Modification of the dermal structure was seen in the 4-week observation period. Spaces seen after 7 days were filled up with collagen matrix until day 28. Epidermal layer decreased continuously during the observation period. High-power field analysis of the sections demonstrating the amount of cells within the epidermis (b) and the dermis (c). No tissue necrosis was observed over the time course of 28 days. Images from 5-μm formalin fixed tissue sections at a 50-fold magnification.

Mentions: The epidermis of skin explants also showed changes in its morphologic structure. Until day 7, the cells of the basal layer were strictly organized and aligned in a parallel fashion. From day 14 onward, these cells started to lose their organizational structure and spindle-shaped cells were observed. Starting at day 21, postoperative gaps were observed within the junction of the epidermis and the dermis (Fig 1).


A human full-skin culture system for interventional studies.

Steinstraesser L, Rittig A, Gevers K, Sorkin M, Hirsch T, Kesting M, Sand M, Al-Benna S, Langer S, Steinau HU, Jacobsen F - Eplasty (2009)

Histological analysis. HE-stained cross-sections of skin tissue samples (a). Modification of the dermal structure was seen in the 4-week observation period. Spaces seen after 7 days were filled up with collagen matrix until day 28. Epidermal layer decreased continuously during the observation period. High-power field analysis of the sections demonstrating the amount of cells within the epidermis (b) and the dermis (c). No tissue necrosis was observed over the time course of 28 days. Images from 5-μm formalin fixed tissue sections at a 50-fold magnification.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2627306&req=5

Figure 1: Histological analysis. HE-stained cross-sections of skin tissue samples (a). Modification of the dermal structure was seen in the 4-week observation period. Spaces seen after 7 days were filled up with collagen matrix until day 28. Epidermal layer decreased continuously during the observation period. High-power field analysis of the sections demonstrating the amount of cells within the epidermis (b) and the dermis (c). No tissue necrosis was observed over the time course of 28 days. Images from 5-μm formalin fixed tissue sections at a 50-fold magnification.
Mentions: The epidermis of skin explants also showed changes in its morphologic structure. Until day 7, the cells of the basal layer were strictly organized and aligned in a parallel fashion. From day 14 onward, these cells started to lose their organizational structure and spindle-shaped cells were observed. Starting at day 21, postoperative gaps were observed within the junction of the epidermis and the dermis (Fig 1).

Bottom Line: The aim of this study was to develop an effective surrogate model in which ex vivo full-thickness organ culture experiments may be performed.Transgene expression was demonstrated to be time dependent.This model chamber presents a convenient, easy-to-use, and robust model in which ex vivo full-thickness organ culture experiments may be performed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department for Plastic Surgery, Burn Center, BG University Hospital Bergmannsheil, Ruhr University Bochum, Bochum, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Novel approaches to bridge the gap between clinical studies and experimental basic research of skin physiology are urgently needed. The aim of this study was to develop an effective surrogate model in which ex vivo full-thickness organ culture experiments may be performed.

Methods: Human full skin from patients was placed into a stainless steel chamber and cultured at an air-liquid interphase for 4 weeks. Samples were evaluated every week by HE-staining and immunohistochemical characterization. Epidermal gene transfer kinetics was performed as an interventional study.

Results: This ex vivo chamber model maintained the physiologic and histologic properties of the skin explants for 4 weeks. This indicated the model's acceptable ex vivo physiologic validity. No epidermolysis was observed, and both basal lamina and blood vessels were detected within all tissue samples. Transgene expression was demonstrated to be time dependent.

Conclusion: This model chamber presents a convenient, easy-to-use, and robust model in which ex vivo full-thickness organ culture experiments may be performed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus