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Tracking of neural stem cells in rats with intracerebral hemorrhage by the use of 3T MRI.

Chang NK, Jeong YY, Park JS, Jeong HS, Jang S, Jang MJ, Lee JH, Shin SS, Yoon W, Chung TW, Kang HK - Korean J Radiol (2008 May-Jun)

Bottom Line: On MRI three weeks after transplantation, there was a hypointense line along the corpus callosum and decreased signal intensity in the right periventricular region.Histological findings three weeks after transplantation confirmed the presence of the hypointense line representing SPIO-labeled NSCs.Therefore, 3T MRI could be feasible for detecting the migration of NSCs in the clinical setting of stem cell therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwang-ju, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To access the feasibility of clinically available 3T MRI to detect the migration of labeled neural stem cells (NSCs) in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a rat model.

Materials and methods: The ethics committee of our institution approved this study. ICH was induced by the injection of collagenase type IV into the right striatum of ten Sprague-Dawley rats. Human NSCs conjugated with Feridex (super-paramagnetic iron oxide: SPIO) were transplanted into the left striatum one week after ICH induction. MRI was performed on a 3T scanner during the first, second, third, fourth, and sixth weeks post-transplantation. MRI was obtained using coronal T2- and T2*-weighted sequences. Two rats were sacrificed every week after in vivo MRI in order to analyze the histological findings.

Results: ICH in the right striatum was detected by MRI one and two weeks after transplantation without migration of the NSCs. There was no migration of the NSCs as seen on the histological findings one week after transplantation. The histological findings two weeks after transplantation showed a small number of NSCs along the corpus callosum. On MRI three weeks after transplantation, there was a hypointense line along the corpus callosum and decreased signal intensity in the right periventricular region. Histological findings three weeks after transplantation confirmed the presence of the hypointense line representing SPIO-labeled NSCs. MRI four and six weeks after transplantation showed a hypointense spot in the right periventricular region. The histological findings four and six weeks after transplantation showed the presence of prominent NSCs in the right periventricular region.

Conclusion: 3T MRI can detect the migration of NSCs in rats with ICH along the corpus callosum. Therefore, 3T MRI could be feasible for detecting the migration of NSCs in the clinical setting of stem cell therapy.

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MR and histological findings three weeks after implantation of neural stem cells.A. T2-weighted image (TR/TE = 3,000/100 msec) shows decreased size (arrow) of intracerebral hemorrhage two weeks after implantation of neural stem cells.B. T2*-weighted image (TR/TE = 231/10 msec) shows decreased size of hypointense spot (curved arrow) in left striatum. Linear low signal intensity (arrows) along corpus callosum is considered to represent SPIO-labeled neural stem cells. There is small, hypointense spot in right, periventricular region (arrowheads), suggestive of migrated neural stem cells.C. Prussian blue staining (objective magnification: × 2) shows large number of SPIO-labeled, neural stem cells in corpus callosum (arrows).D. Immunohistochemical staining (objective magnification: × 2) shows neural stem cells in corpus callosum (arrows).
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Figure 5: MR and histological findings three weeks after implantation of neural stem cells.A. T2-weighted image (TR/TE = 3,000/100 msec) shows decreased size (arrow) of intracerebral hemorrhage two weeks after implantation of neural stem cells.B. T2*-weighted image (TR/TE = 231/10 msec) shows decreased size of hypointense spot (curved arrow) in left striatum. Linear low signal intensity (arrows) along corpus callosum is considered to represent SPIO-labeled neural stem cells. There is small, hypointense spot in right, periventricular region (arrowheads), suggestive of migrated neural stem cells.C. Prussian blue staining (objective magnification: × 2) shows large number of SPIO-labeled, neural stem cells in corpus callosum (arrows).D. Immunohistochemical staining (objective magnification: × 2) shows neural stem cells in corpus callosum (arrows).

Mentions: On MRI three weeks after implantation, T2-weighted imaging showed a further decrease in the size of ICH in the right striatum. T2*-weighted imaging showed a decreased size of the hypointense spot in the left striatum and linear hypointensity along the corpus callosum, which is considered to represent labeled NSCs. There was also a small, hypointense spot in the right periventricular region. Prussian blue staining and immunohistochemical staining showed a large number of labeled NSCs along the corpus callosum and right periventricular region (Fig. 5).


Tracking of neural stem cells in rats with intracerebral hemorrhage by the use of 3T MRI.

Chang NK, Jeong YY, Park JS, Jeong HS, Jang S, Jang MJ, Lee JH, Shin SS, Yoon W, Chung TW, Kang HK - Korean J Radiol (2008 May-Jun)

MR and histological findings three weeks after implantation of neural stem cells.A. T2-weighted image (TR/TE = 3,000/100 msec) shows decreased size (arrow) of intracerebral hemorrhage two weeks after implantation of neural stem cells.B. T2*-weighted image (TR/TE = 231/10 msec) shows decreased size of hypointense spot (curved arrow) in left striatum. Linear low signal intensity (arrows) along corpus callosum is considered to represent SPIO-labeled neural stem cells. There is small, hypointense spot in right, periventricular region (arrowheads), suggestive of migrated neural stem cells.C. Prussian blue staining (objective magnification: × 2) shows large number of SPIO-labeled, neural stem cells in corpus callosum (arrows).D. Immunohistochemical staining (objective magnification: × 2) shows neural stem cells in corpus callosum (arrows).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2627254&req=5

Figure 5: MR and histological findings three weeks after implantation of neural stem cells.A. T2-weighted image (TR/TE = 3,000/100 msec) shows decreased size (arrow) of intracerebral hemorrhage two weeks after implantation of neural stem cells.B. T2*-weighted image (TR/TE = 231/10 msec) shows decreased size of hypointense spot (curved arrow) in left striatum. Linear low signal intensity (arrows) along corpus callosum is considered to represent SPIO-labeled neural stem cells. There is small, hypointense spot in right, periventricular region (arrowheads), suggestive of migrated neural stem cells.C. Prussian blue staining (objective magnification: × 2) shows large number of SPIO-labeled, neural stem cells in corpus callosum (arrows).D. Immunohistochemical staining (objective magnification: × 2) shows neural stem cells in corpus callosum (arrows).
Mentions: On MRI three weeks after implantation, T2-weighted imaging showed a further decrease in the size of ICH in the right striatum. T2*-weighted imaging showed a decreased size of the hypointense spot in the left striatum and linear hypointensity along the corpus callosum, which is considered to represent labeled NSCs. There was also a small, hypointense spot in the right periventricular region. Prussian blue staining and immunohistochemical staining showed a large number of labeled NSCs along the corpus callosum and right periventricular region (Fig. 5).

Bottom Line: On MRI three weeks after transplantation, there was a hypointense line along the corpus callosum and decreased signal intensity in the right periventricular region.Histological findings three weeks after transplantation confirmed the presence of the hypointense line representing SPIO-labeled NSCs.Therefore, 3T MRI could be feasible for detecting the migration of NSCs in the clinical setting of stem cell therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwang-ju, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To access the feasibility of clinically available 3T MRI to detect the migration of labeled neural stem cells (NSCs) in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a rat model.

Materials and methods: The ethics committee of our institution approved this study. ICH was induced by the injection of collagenase type IV into the right striatum of ten Sprague-Dawley rats. Human NSCs conjugated with Feridex (super-paramagnetic iron oxide: SPIO) were transplanted into the left striatum one week after ICH induction. MRI was performed on a 3T scanner during the first, second, third, fourth, and sixth weeks post-transplantation. MRI was obtained using coronal T2- and T2*-weighted sequences. Two rats were sacrificed every week after in vivo MRI in order to analyze the histological findings.

Results: ICH in the right striatum was detected by MRI one and two weeks after transplantation without migration of the NSCs. There was no migration of the NSCs as seen on the histological findings one week after transplantation. The histological findings two weeks after transplantation showed a small number of NSCs along the corpus callosum. On MRI three weeks after transplantation, there was a hypointense line along the corpus callosum and decreased signal intensity in the right periventricular region. Histological findings three weeks after transplantation confirmed the presence of the hypointense line representing SPIO-labeled NSCs. MRI four and six weeks after transplantation showed a hypointense spot in the right periventricular region. The histological findings four and six weeks after transplantation showed the presence of prominent NSCs in the right periventricular region.

Conclusion: 3T MRI can detect the migration of NSCs in rats with ICH along the corpus callosum. Therefore, 3T MRI could be feasible for detecting the migration of NSCs in the clinical setting of stem cell therapy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus