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Interventional management of gastrointestinal fistulas.

Kwon SH, Oh JH, Kim HJ, Park SJ, Park HC - Korean J Radiol (2008 Nov-Dec)

Bottom Line: Gastrointestinal (GI) fistulas are frequently very serious complications that are associated with high morbidity and mortality.GI fistulas can cause a wide array of pathophysiological effects by allowing abnormal diversion of the GI contents, including digestive fluid, water, electrolytes, and nutrients, from either one intestine to another or from the intestine to the skin.In addition, new interventional management techniques continue to emerge.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Gastrointestinal (GI) fistulas are frequently very serious complications that are associated with high morbidity and mortality. GI fistulas can cause a wide array of pathophysiological effects by allowing abnormal diversion of the GI contents, including digestive fluid, water, electrolytes, and nutrients, from either one intestine to another or from the intestine to the skin. As an alternative to surgery, recent technical advances in interventional radiology and percutaneous techniques have been shown as advantageous to lower the morbidity and mortality rate, and allow for superior accessibility to the fistulous tracts via the use of fistulography. In addition, new interventional management techniques continue to emerge. We describe the clinical and imaging features of GI fistulas and outline the interventional management of GI fistulas.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Large abscess formation in mesenteric root after Billroth II operation due to stomach cancer.A. US image shows heterogenous echoic fluid collection (arrows) in mesenteric root.B, C. CT guided 21-gauge needle puncture (B, arrow) and fluoroscopy-guide 10 Fr drainage catheter insertion (C). In C, fistulous tract to third portion of duodenum is observed (arrows).
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Figure 6: Large abscess formation in mesenteric root after Billroth II operation due to stomach cancer.A. US image shows heterogenous echoic fluid collection (arrows) in mesenteric root.B, C. CT guided 21-gauge needle puncture (B, arrow) and fluoroscopy-guide 10 Fr drainage catheter insertion (C). In C, fistulous tract to third portion of duodenum is observed (arrows).

Mentions: US is portable, rapid, free of ionizing radiation, and inexpensive to perform. The diagnostic accuracy for the identification of an abscess cavity compares favorably to CT. US is used as the first screening modality in most patients (Figs. 5, 6). However, patients who are obese, have an ileus or extensive surgical wounds may be difficult to examine.


Interventional management of gastrointestinal fistulas.

Kwon SH, Oh JH, Kim HJ, Park SJ, Park HC - Korean J Radiol (2008 Nov-Dec)

Large abscess formation in mesenteric root after Billroth II operation due to stomach cancer.A. US image shows heterogenous echoic fluid collection (arrows) in mesenteric root.B, C. CT guided 21-gauge needle puncture (B, arrow) and fluoroscopy-guide 10 Fr drainage catheter insertion (C). In C, fistulous tract to third portion of duodenum is observed (arrows).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2627247&req=5

Figure 6: Large abscess formation in mesenteric root after Billroth II operation due to stomach cancer.A. US image shows heterogenous echoic fluid collection (arrows) in mesenteric root.B, C. CT guided 21-gauge needle puncture (B, arrow) and fluoroscopy-guide 10 Fr drainage catheter insertion (C). In C, fistulous tract to third portion of duodenum is observed (arrows).
Mentions: US is portable, rapid, free of ionizing radiation, and inexpensive to perform. The diagnostic accuracy for the identification of an abscess cavity compares favorably to CT. US is used as the first screening modality in most patients (Figs. 5, 6). However, patients who are obese, have an ileus or extensive surgical wounds may be difficult to examine.

Bottom Line: Gastrointestinal (GI) fistulas are frequently very serious complications that are associated with high morbidity and mortality.GI fistulas can cause a wide array of pathophysiological effects by allowing abnormal diversion of the GI contents, including digestive fluid, water, electrolytes, and nutrients, from either one intestine to another or from the intestine to the skin.In addition, new interventional management techniques continue to emerge.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Gastrointestinal (GI) fistulas are frequently very serious complications that are associated with high morbidity and mortality. GI fistulas can cause a wide array of pathophysiological effects by allowing abnormal diversion of the GI contents, including digestive fluid, water, electrolytes, and nutrients, from either one intestine to another or from the intestine to the skin. As an alternative to surgery, recent technical advances in interventional radiology and percutaneous techniques have been shown as advantageous to lower the morbidity and mortality rate, and allow for superior accessibility to the fistulous tracts via the use of fistulography. In addition, new interventional management techniques continue to emerge. We describe the clinical and imaging features of GI fistulas and outline the interventional management of GI fistulas.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus