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Radiation exposure to premature infants in a neonatal intensive care unit in Turkey.

Olgar T, Onal E, Bor D, Okumus N, Atalay Y, Turkyilmaz C, Ergenekon E, Koc E - Korean J Radiol (2008 Sep-Oct)

Bottom Line: We retrospectively evaluated the entrance skin doses (ESDs) and effective doses of 23 infants with a gestational age as low as 28 weeks.Mean effective doses were 16 and 27 microSv per procedure for the chest and abdomen, respectively.The results of our study show that neonates received acceptable doses from common radiological examinations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ankara University, Institute of Nuclear Science, Tandogan, Ankara, Turkey. olgar@eng.ankara.edu.tr

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of this work was to determine the radiation dose received by infants from radiographic exposure and the contribution from scatter radiation due to radiographic exposure of other infants in the same room.

Materials and methods: We retrospectively evaluated the entrance skin doses (ESDs) and effective doses of 23 infants with a gestational age as low as 28 weeks. ESDs were determined from tube output measurements (ESD(TO)) (n = 23) and from the use of thermoluminescent dosimetry (ESD(TLD)) (n = 16). Scattered radiation was evaluated using a 5 cm Perspex phantom. Effective doses were estimated from ESD(TO) by Monte Carlo computed software and radiation risks were estimated from the effective dose. ESD(TO) and ESD(TLD) were correlated using linear regression analysis.

Results: The mean ESD(TO) for the chest and abdomen were 67 microGy and 65 microGy per procedure, respectively. The mean ESD(TLD) per radiograph was 70 microGy. The measured scattered radiation range at a 2 m distance from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) was (11-17 nGy) [DOSAGE ERROR CORRECTED]per radiograph. Mean effective doses were 16 and 27 microSv per procedure for the chest and abdomen, respectively. ESD(TLD) was well correlated with ESD(TO) obtained from the total chest and abdomen radiographs for each infant (R(2) = 0.86). The radiation risks for childhood cancer estimated from the effective dose were 0.4 x 10(-6) to 2 x 10(-6) and 0.6 x 10(-6) to 2.9 x 10(-6) for chest and abdomen radiographs, respectively.

Conclusion: The results of our study show that neonates received acceptable doses from common radiological examinations. Although the contribution of scatter radiation to the neonatal dose is low, considering the sensitivity of the neonates to radiation, further protective action was performed by increasing the distance of the infants from each other.

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Correlation of the ESDTLD with ESDTO
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Figure 1: Correlation of the ESDTLD with ESDTO

Mentions: The mean numbers of radiographs received by one infant were 14 and 5 for chest and abdomen examinations, respectively. The mean ESDTO per radiograph was calculated by dividing the sum of the ESDTO by the total radiography numbers for each examination. The mean ESDTO per radiograph were 67 µGy and 65 µGy for the chest and abdomen, respectively. The mean ESDTLD was 70 µGy. ESDTLD was well correlated with ESDTO obtained from the total chest and abdomen radiographs for each infant (R2 = 0.86) (Fig. 1).


Radiation exposure to premature infants in a neonatal intensive care unit in Turkey.

Olgar T, Onal E, Bor D, Okumus N, Atalay Y, Turkyilmaz C, Ergenekon E, Koc E - Korean J Radiol (2008 Sep-Oct)

Correlation of the ESDTLD with ESDTO
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2627210&req=5

Figure 1: Correlation of the ESDTLD with ESDTO
Mentions: The mean numbers of radiographs received by one infant were 14 and 5 for chest and abdomen examinations, respectively. The mean ESDTO per radiograph was calculated by dividing the sum of the ESDTO by the total radiography numbers for each examination. The mean ESDTO per radiograph were 67 µGy and 65 µGy for the chest and abdomen, respectively. The mean ESDTLD was 70 µGy. ESDTLD was well correlated with ESDTO obtained from the total chest and abdomen radiographs for each infant (R2 = 0.86) (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: We retrospectively evaluated the entrance skin doses (ESDs) and effective doses of 23 infants with a gestational age as low as 28 weeks.Mean effective doses were 16 and 27 microSv per procedure for the chest and abdomen, respectively.The results of our study show that neonates received acceptable doses from common radiological examinations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ankara University, Institute of Nuclear Science, Tandogan, Ankara, Turkey. olgar@eng.ankara.edu.tr

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of this work was to determine the radiation dose received by infants from radiographic exposure and the contribution from scatter radiation due to radiographic exposure of other infants in the same room.

Materials and methods: We retrospectively evaluated the entrance skin doses (ESDs) and effective doses of 23 infants with a gestational age as low as 28 weeks. ESDs were determined from tube output measurements (ESD(TO)) (n = 23) and from the use of thermoluminescent dosimetry (ESD(TLD)) (n = 16). Scattered radiation was evaluated using a 5 cm Perspex phantom. Effective doses were estimated from ESD(TO) by Monte Carlo computed software and radiation risks were estimated from the effective dose. ESD(TO) and ESD(TLD) were correlated using linear regression analysis.

Results: The mean ESD(TO) for the chest and abdomen were 67 microGy and 65 microGy per procedure, respectively. The mean ESD(TLD) per radiograph was 70 microGy. The measured scattered radiation range at a 2 m distance from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) was (11-17 nGy) [DOSAGE ERROR CORRECTED]per radiograph. Mean effective doses were 16 and 27 microSv per procedure for the chest and abdomen, respectively. ESD(TLD) was well correlated with ESD(TO) obtained from the total chest and abdomen radiographs for each infant (R(2) = 0.86). The radiation risks for childhood cancer estimated from the effective dose were 0.4 x 10(-6) to 2 x 10(-6) and 0.6 x 10(-6) to 2.9 x 10(-6) for chest and abdomen radiographs, respectively.

Conclusion: The results of our study show that neonates received acceptable doses from common radiological examinations. Although the contribution of scatter radiation to the neonatal dose is low, considering the sensitivity of the neonates to radiation, further protective action was performed by increasing the distance of the infants from each other.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus