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Enhanced osteoblast adhesion on nanostructured selenium compacts for anti-cancer orthopedic applications.

Tran P, Webster TJ - Int J Nanomedicine (2008)

Bottom Line: Through these etching techniques, results of this study showed that biologically inspired surface roughness values were created on selenium compacts to match that of natural bone roughness.Moreover, results showed that healthy bone cell adhesion increased with greater nanometer selenium roughness (more closely matching that of titanium).In this manner, this study suggests that nano-rough selenium should be further tested for orthopedic applications involving bone cancer treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Physics Department, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, USA.

ABSTRACT
Metallic bone implants possess numerous problems limiting their long-term efficacy, such as poor prolonged osseointegration, stress shielding, and corrosion under in vivo environments. Such problems are compounded for bone cancer patients since numerous patients receive orthopedic implants after cancerous bone resection. Unfortunately, current orthopedic materials were not originally developed to simultaneously increase healthy bone growth (as in traditional orthopedic implant applications) while inhibiting cancerous bone growth. The long-term objective of the present research is to investigate the use of nano-rough selenium to prevent bone cancer from re-occurring while promoting healthy bone growth for this select group of cancer patients. Selenium is a well known anti-cancer chemical. However, what is not known is how healthy bone cells interact with selenium. To determine this, selenium, spherical or semispherical shots, were pressed into cylindrical compacts and these compacts were then etched using 1N NaOH to obtain various surface structures ranging from the micron, submicron to nano scales. Changes in surface chemistry were also analyzed. Through these etching techniques, results of this study showed that biologically inspired surface roughness values were created on selenium compacts to match that of natural bone roughness. Moreover, results showed that healthy bone cell adhesion increased with greater nanometer selenium roughness (more closely matching that of titanium). In this manner, this study suggests that nano-rough selenium should be further tested for orthopedic applications involving bone cancer treatment.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

SEM images of an untreated selenium compact (A) and selenium compacts treated with 1N NaOH for 10 min (B) and 30 min (C).Note: Bars = 1 micrometer.
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f1-ijn-3-391: SEM images of an untreated selenium compact (A) and selenium compacts treated with 1N NaOH for 10 min (B) and 30 min (C).Note: Bars = 1 micrometer.

Mentions: The SEM images of the selenium compacts (untreated and treated with NaOH for different time periods) revealed various surface roughness. Untreated surfaces (Figure 1 image A) possessed mostly micron rough surface features while those treated with 1N NaOH for different time periods created submicron (Figure 1 image B) and nano-rough (Figure 1 image C) surface features on selenium. In particular, biologically inspired surface roughness increased with increasing NaOH treatment time periods. As the etchant, NaOH is believed to dissolve the oxide layer on the surface of the selenium compacts creating submicron and nanometer features at increasing times.


Enhanced osteoblast adhesion on nanostructured selenium compacts for anti-cancer orthopedic applications.

Tran P, Webster TJ - Int J Nanomedicine (2008)

SEM images of an untreated selenium compact (A) and selenium compacts treated with 1N NaOH for 10 min (B) and 30 min (C).Note: Bars = 1 micrometer.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2626931&req=5

f1-ijn-3-391: SEM images of an untreated selenium compact (A) and selenium compacts treated with 1N NaOH for 10 min (B) and 30 min (C).Note: Bars = 1 micrometer.
Mentions: The SEM images of the selenium compacts (untreated and treated with NaOH for different time periods) revealed various surface roughness. Untreated surfaces (Figure 1 image A) possessed mostly micron rough surface features while those treated with 1N NaOH for different time periods created submicron (Figure 1 image B) and nano-rough (Figure 1 image C) surface features on selenium. In particular, biologically inspired surface roughness increased with increasing NaOH treatment time periods. As the etchant, NaOH is believed to dissolve the oxide layer on the surface of the selenium compacts creating submicron and nanometer features at increasing times.

Bottom Line: Through these etching techniques, results of this study showed that biologically inspired surface roughness values were created on selenium compacts to match that of natural bone roughness.Moreover, results showed that healthy bone cell adhesion increased with greater nanometer selenium roughness (more closely matching that of titanium).In this manner, this study suggests that nano-rough selenium should be further tested for orthopedic applications involving bone cancer treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Physics Department, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, USA.

ABSTRACT
Metallic bone implants possess numerous problems limiting their long-term efficacy, such as poor prolonged osseointegration, stress shielding, and corrosion under in vivo environments. Such problems are compounded for bone cancer patients since numerous patients receive orthopedic implants after cancerous bone resection. Unfortunately, current orthopedic materials were not originally developed to simultaneously increase healthy bone growth (as in traditional orthopedic implant applications) while inhibiting cancerous bone growth. The long-term objective of the present research is to investigate the use of nano-rough selenium to prevent bone cancer from re-occurring while promoting healthy bone growth for this select group of cancer patients. Selenium is a well known anti-cancer chemical. However, what is not known is how healthy bone cells interact with selenium. To determine this, selenium, spherical or semispherical shots, were pressed into cylindrical compacts and these compacts were then etched using 1N NaOH to obtain various surface structures ranging from the micron, submicron to nano scales. Changes in surface chemistry were also analyzed. Through these etching techniques, results of this study showed that biologically inspired surface roughness values were created on selenium compacts to match that of natural bone roughness. Moreover, results showed that healthy bone cell adhesion increased with greater nanometer selenium roughness (more closely matching that of titanium). In this manner, this study suggests that nano-rough selenium should be further tested for orthopedic applications involving bone cancer treatment.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus