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The role of PET/CT for evaluating breast cancer.

Yang SK, Cho N, Moon WK - Korean J Radiol (2007 Sep-Oct)

Bottom Line: Positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) has been receiving increasing attention during the recent years for making the diagnosis, for determining the staging and for the follow-up of various malignancies.The PET/CT findings of 58 breast cancer patients (age range: 34-79 years old, mean age: 50 years) were retrospectively compared with the PET or CT scans alone.PET/CT was found to be better than PET or CT alone for detecting small tumors or multiple metastases, for accurately localizing lymph node metastasis and for monitoring the response to chemotherapy in breast cancer patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, College of Medicine Seoul National University and The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) has been receiving increasing attention during the recent years for making the diagnosis, for determining the staging and for the follow-up of various malignancies. The PET/CT findings of 58 breast cancer patients (age range: 34-79 years old, mean age: 50 years) were retrospectively compared with the PET or CT scans alone. PET/CT was found to be better than PET or CT alone for detecting small tumors or multiple metastases, for accurately localizing lymph node metastasis and for monitoring the response to chemotherapy in breast cancer patients.

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Multiple distant metastases in a 44-year-old woman with bilateral breast cancer.A. The PET image shows multiple areas of FDG uptake in the thorax and abdomen.B, C. The PET/CT images show high uptake in both breasts (white arrows in B), the mediastinal lymph nodes (black arrows in B) and the visceral organs (arrows in C).
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Figure 5: Multiple distant metastases in a 44-year-old woman with bilateral breast cancer.A. The PET image shows multiple areas of FDG uptake in the thorax and abdomen.B, C. The PET/CT images show high uptake in both breasts (white arrows in B), the mediastinal lymph nodes (black arrows in B) and the visceral organs (arrows in C).

Mentions: Distant metastases from breast cancer are frequently found in the lungs, liver and bones. One advantage of whole-body PET imaging over conventional imaging modalities such as chest films, bone scanning, and abdominal ultrasound is its ability to detect metastasis at different sites and organs during a single examination (Fig. 5). Moon et al. found that whole-body PET imaging had high diagnostic accuracy for patients with suspected recurrent or metastatic breast carcinoma (16). Based on the number of lesions, its sensitivity for detecting distant metastasis was 85% and its specificity was 79%.


The role of PET/CT for evaluating breast cancer.

Yang SK, Cho N, Moon WK - Korean J Radiol (2007 Sep-Oct)

Multiple distant metastases in a 44-year-old woman with bilateral breast cancer.A. The PET image shows multiple areas of FDG uptake in the thorax and abdomen.B, C. The PET/CT images show high uptake in both breasts (white arrows in B), the mediastinal lymph nodes (black arrows in B) and the visceral organs (arrows in C).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2626817&req=5

Figure 5: Multiple distant metastases in a 44-year-old woman with bilateral breast cancer.A. The PET image shows multiple areas of FDG uptake in the thorax and abdomen.B, C. The PET/CT images show high uptake in both breasts (white arrows in B), the mediastinal lymph nodes (black arrows in B) and the visceral organs (arrows in C).
Mentions: Distant metastases from breast cancer are frequently found in the lungs, liver and bones. One advantage of whole-body PET imaging over conventional imaging modalities such as chest films, bone scanning, and abdominal ultrasound is its ability to detect metastasis at different sites and organs during a single examination (Fig. 5). Moon et al. found that whole-body PET imaging had high diagnostic accuracy for patients with suspected recurrent or metastatic breast carcinoma (16). Based on the number of lesions, its sensitivity for detecting distant metastasis was 85% and its specificity was 79%.

Bottom Line: Positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) has been receiving increasing attention during the recent years for making the diagnosis, for determining the staging and for the follow-up of various malignancies.The PET/CT findings of 58 breast cancer patients (age range: 34-79 years old, mean age: 50 years) were retrospectively compared with the PET or CT scans alone.PET/CT was found to be better than PET or CT alone for detecting small tumors or multiple metastases, for accurately localizing lymph node metastasis and for monitoring the response to chemotherapy in breast cancer patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, College of Medicine Seoul National University and The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) has been receiving increasing attention during the recent years for making the diagnosis, for determining the staging and for the follow-up of various malignancies. The PET/CT findings of 58 breast cancer patients (age range: 34-79 years old, mean age: 50 years) were retrospectively compared with the PET or CT scans alone. PET/CT was found to be better than PET or CT alone for detecting small tumors or multiple metastases, for accurately localizing lymph node metastasis and for monitoring the response to chemotherapy in breast cancer patients.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus