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No spark can break a heart

View Article: PubMed Central

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Like other extracellular matrix proteins, SPARC helps to heal wounds by modulating cell–matrix interactions and promoting cell proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis... Here, Schellings et al. find that SPARC uses its wound-healing skills to form strong scars that help prevent cardiac rupture after a heart attack... But after a heart attack, SPARC-less mice—particularly males—had a hard time recovering... Without the protein, which is known to bind directly to type I collagen, the normally strong and structured collagen bundles that form at the site of injury were loose, creating a disorganized scar... Similar collagen defects are seen in healing skin when SPARC is absent... When people (or mice) suffer heart attacks, SPARC levels are known to rise... The protein also appears to be elevated in people with chronic heart dysfunction... Predicting that SPARC provides a protective service to hearts trying to heal, the authors overexpressed SPARC after heart injury in normal mice... As expected, mice with more SPARC survived longer... In nonheart cells, SPARC amplifies signals induced by TGFβ, a cytokine with known heart-healing properties... Indeed, treating SPARC-deficient mice with TGFβ rescued collagen deposition and hastened healing... And as matrix proteins tend to decrease over time, diminishing SPARC expression may help explain why the elderly suffer higher rates of mortality after heart attacks.

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Collagen formation was disorganized in SPARC-less mice, leaving them vulnerable to cardiac rupture.
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fig1: Collagen formation was disorganized in SPARC-less mice, leaving them vulnerable to cardiac rupture.


No spark can break a heart
Collagen formation was disorganized in SPARC-less mice, leaving them vulnerable to cardiac rupture.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2626683&req=5

fig1: Collagen formation was disorganized in SPARC-less mice, leaving them vulnerable to cardiac rupture.

View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Like other extracellular matrix proteins, SPARC helps to heal wounds by modulating cell–matrix interactions and promoting cell proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis... Here, Schellings et al. find that SPARC uses its wound-healing skills to form strong scars that help prevent cardiac rupture after a heart attack... But after a heart attack, SPARC-less mice—particularly males—had a hard time recovering... Without the protein, which is known to bind directly to type I collagen, the normally strong and structured collagen bundles that form at the site of injury were loose, creating a disorganized scar... Similar collagen defects are seen in healing skin when SPARC is absent... When people (or mice) suffer heart attacks, SPARC levels are known to rise... The protein also appears to be elevated in people with chronic heart dysfunction... Predicting that SPARC provides a protective service to hearts trying to heal, the authors overexpressed SPARC after heart injury in normal mice... As expected, mice with more SPARC survived longer... In nonheart cells, SPARC amplifies signals induced by TGFβ, a cytokine with known heart-healing properties... Indeed, treating SPARC-deficient mice with TGFβ rescued collagen deposition and hastened healing... And as matrix proteins tend to decrease over time, diminishing SPARC expression may help explain why the elderly suffer higher rates of mortality after heart attacks.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus