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Alterations on peripheral B cell subsets following an acute uncomplicated clinical malaria infection in children.

Asito AS, Moormann AM, Kiprotich C, Ng'ang'a ZW, Ploutz-Snyder R, Rochford R - Malar. J. (2008)

Bottom Line: The effects of Plasmodium falciparum on B-cell homeostasis have not been well characterized.There was a significant decrease in CD19+ B lymphocytes during acute malaria.Children experiencing an episode of acute uncomplicated clinical malaria experienced profound disturbances in B cell homeostasis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Pure and Applied Science, Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya. aamolo@kisian.mimcom.net

ABSTRACT

Background: The effects of Plasmodium falciparum on B-cell homeostasis have not been well characterized. This study investigated whether an episode of acute malaria in young children results in changes in the peripheral B cell phenotype.

Methods: Using flow-cytofluorimetric analysis, the B cell phenotypes found in the peripheral blood of children aged 2-5 years were characterized during an episode of acute uncomplicated clinical malaria and four weeks post-recovery and in healthy age-matched controls.

Results: There was a significant decrease in CD19+ B lymphocytes during acute malaria. Characterization of the CD19+ B cell subsets in the peripheral blood based on expression of IgD and CD38 revealed a significant decrease in the numbers of naive 1 CD38-IgD+ B cells while there was an increase in CD38+IgD- memory 3 B cells during acute malaria. Further analysis of the peripheral B cell phenotype also identified an expansion of transitional CD10+CD19+ B cells in children following an episode of acute malaria with up to 25% of total CD19+ B cell pool residing in this subset.

Conclusion: Children experiencing an episode of acute uncomplicated clinical malaria experienced profound disturbances in B cell homeostasis.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Alterations in peripheral B cell subsets in children with acute malaria compared to the same children following recovery. Representative FCF analysis of CD19+ B cells stained for CD38 and IgD. Expression of CD38 and IgD can be used to identify naive and memory B cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood [15].
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Figure 1: Alterations in peripheral B cell subsets in children with acute malaria compared to the same children following recovery. Representative FCF analysis of CD19+ B cells stained for CD38 and IgD. Expression of CD38 and IgD can be used to identify naive and memory B cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood [15].

Mentions: Four major populations of B cells in the peripheral blood can be distinguished based on expression of IgD and CD38 [15]: naive 1 (CD38-IgD+), naive 2 (CD38+IgD+), memory 3 (CD38+IgD-) and memory 4 (CD38-IgD-). To determine the frequencies of these B cell subsets in the study population, PBMC were live-gated on CD19+ cells to collect sufficient number of cells for analysis and then analysed for expression of IgD and CD38. A representative FCF analysis is shown in Figure 1A and results for all samples are reported in Table 2. Children with acute clinical malaria had significantly lower naive 1 (CD38-IgD+) B cell subsets compared to the same population following recovery (P = 0.03) and to age-matched healthy controls (P = 0.00). In contrast, elevation of the memory 3 (CD38+IgD-) B cell subset was observed in the acute clinical malaria compared to the same population following recovery (P = 0.00) and to age-matched healthy controls (P = 0.01). Interestingly, the memory 4 (CD38-IgD-) B cell subset was significantly lower in both acute clinical malaria and recovery compared to healthy controls (P = 0.01 and P = 0.00 respectively). This mirrors the increase in the naive 2 (CD38+IgD+) B cell subset during both acute clinical malaria and recovery compared to healthy controls (P = 0.04 and P = 0.01 respectively).


Alterations on peripheral B cell subsets following an acute uncomplicated clinical malaria infection in children.

Asito AS, Moormann AM, Kiprotich C, Ng'ang'a ZW, Ploutz-Snyder R, Rochford R - Malar. J. (2008)

Alterations in peripheral B cell subsets in children with acute malaria compared to the same children following recovery. Representative FCF analysis of CD19+ B cells stained for CD38 and IgD. Expression of CD38 and IgD can be used to identify naive and memory B cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood [15].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2626599&req=5

Figure 1: Alterations in peripheral B cell subsets in children with acute malaria compared to the same children following recovery. Representative FCF analysis of CD19+ B cells stained for CD38 and IgD. Expression of CD38 and IgD can be used to identify naive and memory B cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood [15].
Mentions: Four major populations of B cells in the peripheral blood can be distinguished based on expression of IgD and CD38 [15]: naive 1 (CD38-IgD+), naive 2 (CD38+IgD+), memory 3 (CD38+IgD-) and memory 4 (CD38-IgD-). To determine the frequencies of these B cell subsets in the study population, PBMC were live-gated on CD19+ cells to collect sufficient number of cells for analysis and then analysed for expression of IgD and CD38. A representative FCF analysis is shown in Figure 1A and results for all samples are reported in Table 2. Children with acute clinical malaria had significantly lower naive 1 (CD38-IgD+) B cell subsets compared to the same population following recovery (P = 0.03) and to age-matched healthy controls (P = 0.00). In contrast, elevation of the memory 3 (CD38+IgD-) B cell subset was observed in the acute clinical malaria compared to the same population following recovery (P = 0.00) and to age-matched healthy controls (P = 0.01). Interestingly, the memory 4 (CD38-IgD-) B cell subset was significantly lower in both acute clinical malaria and recovery compared to healthy controls (P = 0.01 and P = 0.00 respectively). This mirrors the increase in the naive 2 (CD38+IgD+) B cell subset during both acute clinical malaria and recovery compared to healthy controls (P = 0.04 and P = 0.01 respectively).

Bottom Line: The effects of Plasmodium falciparum on B-cell homeostasis have not been well characterized.There was a significant decrease in CD19+ B lymphocytes during acute malaria.Children experiencing an episode of acute uncomplicated clinical malaria experienced profound disturbances in B cell homeostasis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Pure and Applied Science, Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya. aamolo@kisian.mimcom.net

ABSTRACT

Background: The effects of Plasmodium falciparum on B-cell homeostasis have not been well characterized. This study investigated whether an episode of acute malaria in young children results in changes in the peripheral B cell phenotype.

Methods: Using flow-cytofluorimetric analysis, the B cell phenotypes found in the peripheral blood of children aged 2-5 years were characterized during an episode of acute uncomplicated clinical malaria and four weeks post-recovery and in healthy age-matched controls.

Results: There was a significant decrease in CD19+ B lymphocytes during acute malaria. Characterization of the CD19+ B cell subsets in the peripheral blood based on expression of IgD and CD38 revealed a significant decrease in the numbers of naive 1 CD38-IgD+ B cells while there was an increase in CD38+IgD- memory 3 B cells during acute malaria. Further analysis of the peripheral B cell phenotype also identified an expansion of transitional CD10+CD19+ B cells in children following an episode of acute malaria with up to 25% of total CD19+ B cell pool residing in this subset.

Conclusion: Children experiencing an episode of acute uncomplicated clinical malaria experienced profound disturbances in B cell homeostasis.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus