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Development of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Depends on Signaling Synergy

View Article: PubMed Central

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Once a signal reaches a receptor, it triggers a series of biochemical reactions as different molecules transform the external signal into a biological response, in a process called signal transduction... Growth factor receptors are an important subset of RTKs... The platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) family activates downstream signaling enzymes that stimulate the growth and motility of connective tissue cells, such as vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), oligodendrocytes (cells of the tissue encasing nerve fibers), and chondrocytes (cartilage cells)... While studies of signal transduction of this growth factor have established a model of how receptor tyrosine kinases function, the role of individual downstream signaling components in a living organism is still unclear... They had previously investigated the functions of two other downstream signaling proteins in similar experiments... Surprisingly, Tallquist et al. found that losing some of the individual components did not produce a significant negative physiological effect... Only when multiple downstream signaling pathways were disrupted did the researchers see a significant effect on the population of the cells... Reductions in the numbers of both activated receptors and activated signal transduction pathways produced reductions in the population of VSMCs... These results have not been seen in tissue culture before, suggesting that signal transduction is more complex in vivo and that future studies would benefit from incorporating a global approach, rather than targeting a single signaling component... It is also unclear whether these results apply only to these growth factor receptors or explain how RTKs operate in general... Such questions have significant clinical relevance... Understanding how cells control the action of this growth factor is an important step in developing targeted therapies... Since many of these conditions result from a growth factor stuck in the “on” position, inhibiting overactive receptors promises to be an effective clinical intervention.

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Model of growth factor receptor
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pbio.0000062-g001: Model of growth factor receptor


Development of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Depends on Signaling Synergy
Model of growth factor receptor
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC261896&req=5

pbio.0000062-g001: Model of growth factor receptor

View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Once a signal reaches a receptor, it triggers a series of biochemical reactions as different molecules transform the external signal into a biological response, in a process called signal transduction... Growth factor receptors are an important subset of RTKs... The platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) family activates downstream signaling enzymes that stimulate the growth and motility of connective tissue cells, such as vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), oligodendrocytes (cells of the tissue encasing nerve fibers), and chondrocytes (cartilage cells)... While studies of signal transduction of this growth factor have established a model of how receptor tyrosine kinases function, the role of individual downstream signaling components in a living organism is still unclear... They had previously investigated the functions of two other downstream signaling proteins in similar experiments... Surprisingly, Tallquist et al. found that losing some of the individual components did not produce a significant negative physiological effect... Only when multiple downstream signaling pathways were disrupted did the researchers see a significant effect on the population of the cells... Reductions in the numbers of both activated receptors and activated signal transduction pathways produced reductions in the population of VSMCs... These results have not been seen in tissue culture before, suggesting that signal transduction is more complex in vivo and that future studies would benefit from incorporating a global approach, rather than targeting a single signaling component... It is also unclear whether these results apply only to these growth factor receptors or explain how RTKs operate in general... Such questions have significant clinical relevance... Understanding how cells control the action of this growth factor is an important step in developing targeted therapies... Since many of these conditions result from a growth factor stuck in the “on” position, inhibiting overactive receptors promises to be an effective clinical intervention.

No MeSH data available.