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The what and whys of DOIs.

DeRisi S, Kennison R, Twyman N - PLoS Biol. (2003)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

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Along with the DOI and URL, metadata are deposited in the registry that describes the object and may optionally describe a number of formats (say, the HTML, PDF, or XML versions of an article) and a number of locations (say, the same object in PLoS Biology, PubMed Central in the United States, or the Koninklijke Bibliotheek in the Netherlands)... A number of organizations, including PLoS, are also looking at ways DOIs can be used to identify not just the article but also the data to which the article refers... PLoS has decided to assign and deposit DOIs, along with metadata describing the object, not only for the full-text of the article, but also for tables, figures, datasets, movies, audio clips, and supporting information—in short, for anything that might be used as a separate entity in some way; the use of a DOI this way is called “functional granularity. ” One of the benefits of using granular DOIs is that makes it easier to directly cite specific datasets associated with an article as well as the article itself... The CrossRef organization, founded in 1999, includes more than 200 publishers who deposit their article DOIs for use in a citation cross-linking system... Cross-linking and forward-linking systems provide an easy and serendipitous way to find related information... PLoS is using DOIs to provide added functionality that will benefit our readers, authors, scientists, and the open-access publishing community... DOIs make it possible to provide researchers with a seamless way to find information, or, as the IDF FAQ puts it, the use of DOIs enables a researcher to “know what you have, find what you want, know where it exists, be able to get it, and be able to use it. ” Crosslinking citations and assigning DOIs to all entities associated with the articles, including the supporting information, make it easier for everyone to find, get, and use the materials... DOIs are one example of an extension to an existing mechanism— linking citations—that has enabled many new types of functionality... As discussed above, the use of DOIs not only provides a persistent and “online-friendly” mechanism for one article to reference another, but in addition enables more sophisticated applications that resolve to alternate forms of the article and applications in which citations can be followed in both directions... Furthermore, as scientists seek to share larger and more complex datasets, functionally granular DOIs enable researchers or managers of the central archives to persistently identify the proper attribution and licensing terms for datasets and as well as cross-link datasets with their research articles.

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Like the light switches in a worldwide interconnected electric grid, DOIs provide the user with ready access to the scientific data. (Photograph: C. Mayhew and R. Simmon, National Aeronautics and Space Administration/ Goddard Space Flight Center.)
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pbio.0000057-g001: Like the light switches in a worldwide interconnected electric grid, DOIs provide the user with ready access to the scientific data. (Photograph: C. Mayhew and R. Simmon, National Aeronautics and Space Administration/ Goddard Space Flight Center.)


The what and whys of DOIs.

DeRisi S, Kennison R, Twyman N - PLoS Biol. (2003)

Like the light switches in a worldwide interconnected electric grid, DOIs provide the user with ready access to the scientific data. (Photograph: C. Mayhew and R. Simmon, National Aeronautics and Space Administration/ Goddard Space Flight Center.)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC261894&req=5

pbio.0000057-g001: Like the light switches in a worldwide interconnected electric grid, DOIs provide the user with ready access to the scientific data. (Photograph: C. Mayhew and R. Simmon, National Aeronautics and Space Administration/ Goddard Space Flight Center.)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Along with the DOI and URL, metadata are deposited in the registry that describes the object and may optionally describe a number of formats (say, the HTML, PDF, or XML versions of an article) and a number of locations (say, the same object in PLoS Biology, PubMed Central in the United States, or the Koninklijke Bibliotheek in the Netherlands)... A number of organizations, including PLoS, are also looking at ways DOIs can be used to identify not just the article but also the data to which the article refers... PLoS has decided to assign and deposit DOIs, along with metadata describing the object, not only for the full-text of the article, but also for tables, figures, datasets, movies, audio clips, and supporting information—in short, for anything that might be used as a separate entity in some way; the use of a DOI this way is called “functional granularity. ” One of the benefits of using granular DOIs is that makes it easier to directly cite specific datasets associated with an article as well as the article itself... The CrossRef organization, founded in 1999, includes more than 200 publishers who deposit their article DOIs for use in a citation cross-linking system... Cross-linking and forward-linking systems provide an easy and serendipitous way to find related information... PLoS is using DOIs to provide added functionality that will benefit our readers, authors, scientists, and the open-access publishing community... DOIs make it possible to provide researchers with a seamless way to find information, or, as the IDF FAQ puts it, the use of DOIs enables a researcher to “know what you have, find what you want, know where it exists, be able to get it, and be able to use it. ” Crosslinking citations and assigning DOIs to all entities associated with the articles, including the supporting information, make it easier for everyone to find, get, and use the materials... DOIs are one example of an extension to an existing mechanism— linking citations—that has enabled many new types of functionality... As discussed above, the use of DOIs not only provides a persistent and “online-friendly” mechanism for one article to reference another, but in addition enables more sophisticated applications that resolve to alternate forms of the article and applications in which citations can be followed in both directions... Furthermore, as scientists seek to share larger and more complex datasets, functionally granular DOIs enable researchers or managers of the central archives to persistently identify the proper attribution and licensing terms for datasets and as well as cross-link datasets with their research articles.

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