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Biodiversity conservation demands open access.

Fonseca G, Benson PJ - PLoS Biol. (2003)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Programs and Science at Conservation International, Washington, DC, USA. g.fonseca@conservation.org

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To develop effective conservation actions, scientists must continue to uncover basic information, such as how much continuous landscape many species need to survive, and researchers also need to understand the complex dynamics among disease factors, climate change, and human activities that may further threaten species' survival... At the Center for Applied Biodiversity Science (CABS) at Conservation International, we focus on monitoring, understanding, and protecting the Earth's biodiversity hotspots, areas where endemic species are both highly concentrated and highly threatened (see www.biodiversityhotspots.org)... Although free and open access to the progress of scientific thought is vital for the advancement of many disciplines, it is particularly necessary for conservation science... This is true not only because resources for high-cost items such as scientific publications are limited in many of the countries with the most complex and urgent conservation problems, but also because effective conservation solutions must draw ingredients from a wide range of disciplines... The imperative of open access to conservation is perhaps best illustrated by the Tropical Ecology, Assessment, and Monitoring (TEAM) Initiative, set up as part of CABS in 2002 with support from a grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation... The Initiative was created with the aim of accurately tracking large-scale changes in tropical forest ecosystems, in part to gather information that will allow scientists to distinguish the effects of human disturbance from the natural ebb and flow of biological processes... Armed with this up-to-date information, conservation planners will be able to design conservation actions that address the most urgent and real conservation needs more effectively... In addition, by making TEAM analyses publicly available, the Initiative will create a forum in which researchers from widely disparate disciplines can learn from each other's disciplinary languages and practices and can invent ways of bringing together their skills and knowledge (see www.teaminitiative.org)... These examples of models of sharing scientific information, together with a multitude of others that are now emerging, are based on a diverse set of economic incentives and schemes, most of which are still under evaluation... Which models are successful and sustainable will depend on changes in technology, in the culture of science and scientists, and in the marketplace... Although this community is diverse and dispersed, the rewards associated with finding and using reliable information as quickly as possible are increasing dramatically... Precious conservation dollars can be saved or put to more effective and rapid use by avoiding duplication of efforts through the wide and free dissemination of relevant information and by fostering the collaboration among researchers, policy-makers, and funders... These goals should no longer be allowed to fall hostage to the existing constraints imposed by the profit-driven publishing marketplace or by old-fashioned practices of handling scientific data.

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Conservation Priority Setting WorkshopIn partnership with scientists and institutions around the world, CABS researchers are increasingly making use of open-access databases, species lists, and other types of biological information to identify global and regional priorities, to address upcoming threats, and to monitor the results of conservation interventions. (Photograph by Carly Vynne.)
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pbio.0000046-g002: Conservation Priority Setting WorkshopIn partnership with scientists and institutions around the world, CABS researchers are increasingly making use of open-access databases, species lists, and other types of biological information to identify global and regional priorities, to address upcoming threats, and to monitor the results of conservation interventions. (Photograph by Carly Vynne.)

Mentions: Although free and open access to the progress of scientific thought is vital for the advancement of many disciplines, it is particularly necessary for conservation science. This is true not only because resources for high-cost items such as scientific publications are limited in many of the countries with the most complex and urgent conservation problems, but also because effective conservation solutions must draw ingredients from a wide range of disciplines. Many efforts to foster access to conservation-related information are now being developed, some anchored in models of traditional print publishing and others focused on developing Web-based resources such as online journals, electronic forums, and literature archives. We at CABS are taking an active role in many of these kinds of endeavors (Figure 2).


Biodiversity conservation demands open access.

Fonseca G, Benson PJ - PLoS Biol. (2003)

Conservation Priority Setting WorkshopIn partnership with scientists and institutions around the world, CABS researchers are increasingly making use of open-access databases, species lists, and other types of biological information to identify global and regional priorities, to address upcoming threats, and to monitor the results of conservation interventions. (Photograph by Carly Vynne.)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC261885&req=5

pbio.0000046-g002: Conservation Priority Setting WorkshopIn partnership with scientists and institutions around the world, CABS researchers are increasingly making use of open-access databases, species lists, and other types of biological information to identify global and regional priorities, to address upcoming threats, and to monitor the results of conservation interventions. (Photograph by Carly Vynne.)
Mentions: Although free and open access to the progress of scientific thought is vital for the advancement of many disciplines, it is particularly necessary for conservation science. This is true not only because resources for high-cost items such as scientific publications are limited in many of the countries with the most complex and urgent conservation problems, but also because effective conservation solutions must draw ingredients from a wide range of disciplines. Many efforts to foster access to conservation-related information are now being developed, some anchored in models of traditional print publishing and others focused on developing Web-based resources such as online journals, electronic forums, and literature archives. We at CABS are taking an active role in many of these kinds of endeavors (Figure 2).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Programs and Science at Conservation International, Washington, DC, USA. g.fonseca@conservation.org

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

To develop effective conservation actions, scientists must continue to uncover basic information, such as how much continuous landscape many species need to survive, and researchers also need to understand the complex dynamics among disease factors, climate change, and human activities that may further threaten species' survival... At the Center for Applied Biodiversity Science (CABS) at Conservation International, we focus on monitoring, understanding, and protecting the Earth's biodiversity hotspots, areas where endemic species are both highly concentrated and highly threatened (see www.biodiversityhotspots.org)... Although free and open access to the progress of scientific thought is vital for the advancement of many disciplines, it is particularly necessary for conservation science... This is true not only because resources for high-cost items such as scientific publications are limited in many of the countries with the most complex and urgent conservation problems, but also because effective conservation solutions must draw ingredients from a wide range of disciplines... The imperative of open access to conservation is perhaps best illustrated by the Tropical Ecology, Assessment, and Monitoring (TEAM) Initiative, set up as part of CABS in 2002 with support from a grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation... The Initiative was created with the aim of accurately tracking large-scale changes in tropical forest ecosystems, in part to gather information that will allow scientists to distinguish the effects of human disturbance from the natural ebb and flow of biological processes... Armed with this up-to-date information, conservation planners will be able to design conservation actions that address the most urgent and real conservation needs more effectively... In addition, by making TEAM analyses publicly available, the Initiative will create a forum in which researchers from widely disparate disciplines can learn from each other's disciplinary languages and practices and can invent ways of bringing together their skills and knowledge (see www.teaminitiative.org)... These examples of models of sharing scientific information, together with a multitude of others that are now emerging, are based on a diverse set of economic incentives and schemes, most of which are still under evaluation... Which models are successful and sustainable will depend on changes in technology, in the culture of science and scientists, and in the marketplace... Although this community is diverse and dispersed, the rewards associated with finding and using reliable information as quickly as possible are increasing dramatically... Precious conservation dollars can be saved or put to more effective and rapid use by avoiding duplication of efforts through the wide and free dissemination of relevant information and by fostering the collaboration among researchers, policy-makers, and funders... These goals should no longer be allowed to fall hostage to the existing constraints imposed by the profit-driven publishing marketplace or by old-fashioned practices of handling scientific data.

Show MeSH