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Proinflammation and hypertension: a population-based study.

Mauno V, Hannu K, Esko K - Mediators Inflamm. (2008)

Bottom Line: The levels of baseline IL-1beta and IL-1ra were significantly higher for subjects who developed HT during the follow-up than for those who did not (IL-1beta; 0.67 +/- 0.62 pg/mL versus 0.56 +/- 0.32 pg/mL, P = .020 and IL-1ra; 184 +/- 132 pg/mL versus 154 +/- 89 pg/mL, P = .007).After adjustments for age, follow-up time, sex, baseline systolic BP, and BMI, our results confirm a statistically significant (P = .036) linear association between the quartiles of IL-1beta and change of systolic BP during the study.These results provide evidence that proinflammation may precede BP elevation and HT.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unit of Family Practice, Central Hospital of Middle Finland, Jyväskylä, Finland. mauno.vanhala@ksshp.fi

ABSTRACT
There is evidence that proinflammation may be linked to the development of hypertension (HT). We examined the association of both the interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta) and the interleukin 1-receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) with future blood pressure (BP) and HT occurrence (BP >or= 140/90 mmHg, or antihypertensive drug) in a population-based prospective study. Our study consisted of 396 (147 men and 249 women) middle-aged, baseline apparently healthy, normotensive subjects participating in a 6.5-year follow-up study. Subjects with high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) < 10 mg/L were excluded at the initial visit. At follow-up, the occurrence of HT was 32%. The levels of baseline IL-1beta and IL-1ra were significantly higher for subjects who developed HT during the follow-up than for those who did not (IL-1beta; 0.67 +/- 0.62 pg/mL versus 0.56 +/- 0.32 pg/mL, P = .020 and IL-1ra; 184 +/- 132 pg/mL versus 154 +/- 89 pg/mL, P = .007). After adjustments for age, follow-up time, sex, baseline systolic BP, and BMI, our results confirm a statistically significant (P = .036) linear association between the quartiles of IL-1beta and change of systolic BP during the study. After adjustments for age, follow-up time, sex, and BMI, our results also show a linear association between incident HT and the quartiles of IL-1ra. (P = .026). These results provide evidence that proinflammation may precede BP elevation and HT.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Change of systolic bloodpressure (mmHg) by IL-1β and IL-1raquartiles among 377 baseline normotensive subjects without antihypertensivedrug treatment at the end of the 6.5-year prospective study. Adjusted for gender, age, baseline BMI, baselinesystolic blood pressure, and follow-up time.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Change of systolic bloodpressure (mmHg) by IL-1β and IL-1raquartiles among 377 baseline normotensive subjects without antihypertensivedrug treatment at the end of the 6.5-year prospective study. Adjusted for gender, age, baseline BMI, baselinesystolic blood pressure, and follow-up time.

Mentions: The systolic BP increased 6 ± 14 mmHg from the lowest to the highestquartile of IL-1β. This difference was statistically significant (P = .008).The BP values sorted by quartile of IL-1β concentration were 129 ± 13 mmHg,132 ± 16 mmHg, 130 ± 14 mmHg, and 135 ± 15 mmHg (P for linearity = .019).Figure 1 shows that after adjustinggender, age, follow-up time, BMI, and baseline systolic BP, astatistically significant (P = .036) linear association was evidencedbetween the quartiles of IL-1β and the change in the systolic BP during thefollow-up. Further adjustment forsmoking, use of alcohol, and physical exercise at baseline did not change theresults. Taking into account lipid-lowering medication or drugs for othercardiovascular disease did not change these results.


Proinflammation and hypertension: a population-based study.

Mauno V, Hannu K, Esko K - Mediators Inflamm. (2008)

Change of systolic bloodpressure (mmHg) by IL-1β and IL-1raquartiles among 377 baseline normotensive subjects without antihypertensivedrug treatment at the end of the 6.5-year prospective study. Adjusted for gender, age, baseline BMI, baselinesystolic blood pressure, and follow-up time.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2612739&req=5

fig1: Change of systolic bloodpressure (mmHg) by IL-1β and IL-1raquartiles among 377 baseline normotensive subjects without antihypertensivedrug treatment at the end of the 6.5-year prospective study. Adjusted for gender, age, baseline BMI, baselinesystolic blood pressure, and follow-up time.
Mentions: The systolic BP increased 6 ± 14 mmHg from the lowest to the highestquartile of IL-1β. This difference was statistically significant (P = .008).The BP values sorted by quartile of IL-1β concentration were 129 ± 13 mmHg,132 ± 16 mmHg, 130 ± 14 mmHg, and 135 ± 15 mmHg (P for linearity = .019).Figure 1 shows that after adjustinggender, age, follow-up time, BMI, and baseline systolic BP, astatistically significant (P = .036) linear association was evidencedbetween the quartiles of IL-1β and the change in the systolic BP during thefollow-up. Further adjustment forsmoking, use of alcohol, and physical exercise at baseline did not change theresults. Taking into account lipid-lowering medication or drugs for othercardiovascular disease did not change these results.

Bottom Line: The levels of baseline IL-1beta and IL-1ra were significantly higher for subjects who developed HT during the follow-up than for those who did not (IL-1beta; 0.67 +/- 0.62 pg/mL versus 0.56 +/- 0.32 pg/mL, P = .020 and IL-1ra; 184 +/- 132 pg/mL versus 154 +/- 89 pg/mL, P = .007).After adjustments for age, follow-up time, sex, baseline systolic BP, and BMI, our results confirm a statistically significant (P = .036) linear association between the quartiles of IL-1beta and change of systolic BP during the study.These results provide evidence that proinflammation may precede BP elevation and HT.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Unit of Family Practice, Central Hospital of Middle Finland, Jyväskylä, Finland. mauno.vanhala@ksshp.fi

ABSTRACT
There is evidence that proinflammation may be linked to the development of hypertension (HT). We examined the association of both the interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta) and the interleukin 1-receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) with future blood pressure (BP) and HT occurrence (BP >or= 140/90 mmHg, or antihypertensive drug) in a population-based prospective study. Our study consisted of 396 (147 men and 249 women) middle-aged, baseline apparently healthy, normotensive subjects participating in a 6.5-year follow-up study. Subjects with high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) < 10 mg/L were excluded at the initial visit. At follow-up, the occurrence of HT was 32%. The levels of baseline IL-1beta and IL-1ra were significantly higher for subjects who developed HT during the follow-up than for those who did not (IL-1beta; 0.67 +/- 0.62 pg/mL versus 0.56 +/- 0.32 pg/mL, P = .020 and IL-1ra; 184 +/- 132 pg/mL versus 154 +/- 89 pg/mL, P = .007). After adjustments for age, follow-up time, sex, baseline systolic BP, and BMI, our results confirm a statistically significant (P = .036) linear association between the quartiles of IL-1beta and change of systolic BP during the study. After adjustments for age, follow-up time, sex, and BMI, our results also show a linear association between incident HT and the quartiles of IL-1ra. (P = .026). These results provide evidence that proinflammation may precede BP elevation and HT.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus