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Rickettsia typhi and R. felis in rat fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis), Oahu, Hawaii.

Eremeeva ME, Warashina WR, Sturgeon MM, Buchholz AE, Olmsted GK, Park SY, Effler PV, Karpathy SE - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: Rickettsia typhi (prevalence 1.9%) and R. felis (prevalence 24.8%) DNA were detected in rat fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) collected from mice on Oahu Island, Hawaii.The low prevalence of R. typhi on Oahu suggests that R. felis may be a more common cause of rickettsiosis than R. typhi in Hawaii.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA. meremeeva@cdc.gov

ABSTRACT
Rickettsia typhi (prevalence 1.9%) and R. felis (prevalence 24.8%) DNA were detected in rat fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) collected from mice on Oahu Island, Hawaii. The low prevalence of R. typhi on Oahu suggests that R. felis may be a more common cause of rickettsiosis than R. typhi in Hawaii.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Detection of Rickettsia typhi and R. felis DNA in Xenopsylla cheopis trapped in Oahu, Hawaii, in A) 2004 and B) 2006 and 2007. Hawaii is shown in the inset. Symbols correspond to sites of sample collection. White squares, collections in 2004 and 2006 of fleas negative for R. felis and R. typhi; white triangles, collections in 2007 of fleas negative for R. felis and R. typhi; red squares, fleas positive for R. felis; black squares, fleas positive for R. typhi; blue squares, fleas positive for both R. typhi and R. felis. Maps were obtained from www.hear.org/starr/maps/stock/landsat.htm
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Figure 1: Detection of Rickettsia typhi and R. felis DNA in Xenopsylla cheopis trapped in Oahu, Hawaii, in A) 2004 and B) 2006 and 2007. Hawaii is shown in the inset. Symbols correspond to sites of sample collection. White squares, collections in 2004 and 2006 of fleas negative for R. felis and R. typhi; white triangles, collections in 2007 of fleas negative for R. felis and R. typhi; red squares, fleas positive for R. felis; black squares, fleas positive for R. typhi; blue squares, fleas positive for both R. typhi and R. felis. Maps were obtained from www.hear.org/starr/maps/stock/landsat.htm

Mentions: M. musculus mice were collected during rodent population studies in the leeward and southeast parts of Oahu during the summers of 2004, 2006, and 2007 (Figure). Fleas were combed from each animal, identified as X. cheopis by using standard taxonomic keys, and kept frozen at –70°C until they were sent to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Atlanta, GA, USA) for further analyses. Mice were humanely killed; only brains were removed and frozen.


Rickettsia typhi and R. felis in rat fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis), Oahu, Hawaii.

Eremeeva ME, Warashina WR, Sturgeon MM, Buchholz AE, Olmsted GK, Park SY, Effler PV, Karpathy SE - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Detection of Rickettsia typhi and R. felis DNA in Xenopsylla cheopis trapped in Oahu, Hawaii, in A) 2004 and B) 2006 and 2007. Hawaii is shown in the inset. Symbols correspond to sites of sample collection. White squares, collections in 2004 and 2006 of fleas negative for R. felis and R. typhi; white triangles, collections in 2007 of fleas negative for R. felis and R. typhi; red squares, fleas positive for R. felis; black squares, fleas positive for R. typhi; blue squares, fleas positive for both R. typhi and R. felis. Maps were obtained from www.hear.org/starr/maps/stock/landsat.htm
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2609893&req=5

Figure 1: Detection of Rickettsia typhi and R. felis DNA in Xenopsylla cheopis trapped in Oahu, Hawaii, in A) 2004 and B) 2006 and 2007. Hawaii is shown in the inset. Symbols correspond to sites of sample collection. White squares, collections in 2004 and 2006 of fleas negative for R. felis and R. typhi; white triangles, collections in 2007 of fleas negative for R. felis and R. typhi; red squares, fleas positive for R. felis; black squares, fleas positive for R. typhi; blue squares, fleas positive for both R. typhi and R. felis. Maps were obtained from www.hear.org/starr/maps/stock/landsat.htm
Mentions: M. musculus mice were collected during rodent population studies in the leeward and southeast parts of Oahu during the summers of 2004, 2006, and 2007 (Figure). Fleas were combed from each animal, identified as X. cheopis by using standard taxonomic keys, and kept frozen at –70°C until they were sent to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Atlanta, GA, USA) for further analyses. Mice were humanely killed; only brains were removed and frozen.

Bottom Line: Rickettsia typhi (prevalence 1.9%) and R. felis (prevalence 24.8%) DNA were detected in rat fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) collected from mice on Oahu Island, Hawaii.The low prevalence of R. typhi on Oahu suggests that R. felis may be a more common cause of rickettsiosis than R. typhi in Hawaii.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA. meremeeva@cdc.gov

ABSTRACT
Rickettsia typhi (prevalence 1.9%) and R. felis (prevalence 24.8%) DNA were detected in rat fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) collected from mice on Oahu Island, Hawaii. The low prevalence of R. typhi on Oahu suggests that R. felis may be a more common cause of rickettsiosis than R. typhi in Hawaii.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus