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Pyogenic liver abscess as endemic disease, Taiwan.

Tsai FC, Huang YT, Chang LY, Wang JT - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: Diabetes, malignancy, renal disease, and pneumonia were associated with a higher risk for the disease.Renal disease, malignancy, pneumonia, and heart disease correlated with higher death rates; Klebsiella pneumoniae infection and therapeutic procedures were related to lower death rates.Diabetes did not significantly change death rates for the 506 patients from the hospital.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
Pyogenic liver abscess has become a health problem in Taiwanese society. However, the extent of this problem has remained unclear because of the lack of a population-based study. We therefore performed a nationwide analysis of pyogenic liver abscess in Taiwan from 1996 through 2004. We analyzed 29,703 cases from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database and 506 cases from National Taiwan University Hospital. Our analysis showed that the annual incidence of pyogenic liver abscess increased steadily from 11.15/100,000 population in 1996 to 17.59/100,000 in 2004. Diabetes, malignancy, renal disease, and pneumonia were associated with a higher risk for the disease. By contrast, death due to pyogenic liver abscess decreased over time, although population-based abscess-related death increased slightly. Renal disease, malignancy, pneumonia, and heart disease correlated with higher death rates; Klebsiella pneumoniae infection and therapeutic procedures were related to lower death rates. Diabetes did not significantly change death rates for the 506 patients from the hospital.

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Deaths from pyogenic liver abscess in Taiwan, showing a steady decrease from 1996 to 2004. Mortality rate is expressed as the number of deaths reported from pyogenic liver abscess cases per year. A) The linear decrease of the primary mortality data (raw mortality) with the year can be described with this formula: mortality (×1/100) = −0.314 × year + 639.58 (r = 0.910, p<0.001). B) The linear decrease of the standardized mortality data (the mortality normalized according to the age distribution of the population) with the year can be described with this formula: mortality (×1/100) = −0.383 × year +776.59 (r = 0.944, p<0.001). r, Pearson correlation coefficient. p<0.05 is considered statistically significant.
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Figure 3: Deaths from pyogenic liver abscess in Taiwan, showing a steady decrease from 1996 to 2004. Mortality rate is expressed as the number of deaths reported from pyogenic liver abscess cases per year. A) The linear decrease of the primary mortality data (raw mortality) with the year can be described with this formula: mortality (×1/100) = −0.314 × year + 639.58 (r = 0.910, p<0.001). B) The linear decrease of the standardized mortality data (the mortality normalized according to the age distribution of the population) with the year can be described with this formula: mortality (×1/100) = −0.383 × year +776.59 (r = 0.944, p<0.001). r, Pearson correlation coefficient. p<0.05 is considered statistically significant.

Mentions: In contrast to increased incidence rates from 1996 through 2004, the disease-specific death rate declined steadily from 12.33% in 1996 to 9.72% in 2004 while the number of deaths caused by pyogenic liver abscess increased slightly over this same timeframe (Figure 2, panel B). The yearly change in the death rate was –0.31% (r = 0.91, p<0.001) (Figure 3, panel A). When we calculated age-standardized death rates, the decrease was 0.38%/year (r = 0.94, p<0.001) (Figure 3, panel B). Death rates did not differ much between males and females (10.7% vs. 11.3%) (Table 1). Death rates increased slowly for men and women 35–85 years of age and peaked for those 90–94 years of age (33.81%). Minor peaks were noted for adolescents 10–14 years of age (19.35%) and for young men 20–24 years of age (12.36%), respectively.


Pyogenic liver abscess as endemic disease, Taiwan.

Tsai FC, Huang YT, Chang LY, Wang JT - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Deaths from pyogenic liver abscess in Taiwan, showing a steady decrease from 1996 to 2004. Mortality rate is expressed as the number of deaths reported from pyogenic liver abscess cases per year. A) The linear decrease of the primary mortality data (raw mortality) with the year can be described with this formula: mortality (×1/100) = −0.314 × year + 639.58 (r = 0.910, p<0.001). B) The linear decrease of the standardized mortality data (the mortality normalized according to the age distribution of the population) with the year can be described with this formula: mortality (×1/100) = −0.383 × year +776.59 (r = 0.944, p<0.001). r, Pearson correlation coefficient. p<0.05 is considered statistically significant.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2609891&req=5

Figure 3: Deaths from pyogenic liver abscess in Taiwan, showing a steady decrease from 1996 to 2004. Mortality rate is expressed as the number of deaths reported from pyogenic liver abscess cases per year. A) The linear decrease of the primary mortality data (raw mortality) with the year can be described with this formula: mortality (×1/100) = −0.314 × year + 639.58 (r = 0.910, p<0.001). B) The linear decrease of the standardized mortality data (the mortality normalized according to the age distribution of the population) with the year can be described with this formula: mortality (×1/100) = −0.383 × year +776.59 (r = 0.944, p<0.001). r, Pearson correlation coefficient. p<0.05 is considered statistically significant.
Mentions: In contrast to increased incidence rates from 1996 through 2004, the disease-specific death rate declined steadily from 12.33% in 1996 to 9.72% in 2004 while the number of deaths caused by pyogenic liver abscess increased slightly over this same timeframe (Figure 2, panel B). The yearly change in the death rate was –0.31% (r = 0.91, p<0.001) (Figure 3, panel A). When we calculated age-standardized death rates, the decrease was 0.38%/year (r = 0.94, p<0.001) (Figure 3, panel B). Death rates did not differ much between males and females (10.7% vs. 11.3%) (Table 1). Death rates increased slowly for men and women 35–85 years of age and peaked for those 90–94 years of age (33.81%). Minor peaks were noted for adolescents 10–14 years of age (19.35%) and for young men 20–24 years of age (12.36%), respectively.

Bottom Line: Diabetes, malignancy, renal disease, and pneumonia were associated with a higher risk for the disease.Renal disease, malignancy, pneumonia, and heart disease correlated with higher death rates; Klebsiella pneumoniae infection and therapeutic procedures were related to lower death rates.Diabetes did not significantly change death rates for the 506 patients from the hospital.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
Pyogenic liver abscess has become a health problem in Taiwanese society. However, the extent of this problem has remained unclear because of the lack of a population-based study. We therefore performed a nationwide analysis of pyogenic liver abscess in Taiwan from 1996 through 2004. We analyzed 29,703 cases from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database and 506 cases from National Taiwan University Hospital. Our analysis showed that the annual incidence of pyogenic liver abscess increased steadily from 11.15/100,000 population in 1996 to 17.59/100,000 in 2004. Diabetes, malignancy, renal disease, and pneumonia were associated with a higher risk for the disease. By contrast, death due to pyogenic liver abscess decreased over time, although population-based abscess-related death increased slightly. Renal disease, malignancy, pneumonia, and heart disease correlated with higher death rates; Klebsiella pneumoniae infection and therapeutic procedures were related to lower death rates. Diabetes did not significantly change death rates for the 506 patients from the hospital.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus