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Ecological factors associated with West Nile virus transmission, northeastern United States.

Brown HE, Childs JE, Diuk-Wasser MA, Fish D - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: Among the 56.6 million residents in 8 northeastern states sharing primary enzootic vectors, we found 977 cases.A significant trend was apparent among increasingly urban counties; county quartiles with the least (<38%) forest cover had 4.4-fold greater odds (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-13.2, p = 0.01) of having above-median disease incidence (>0.75 cases/100,000 residents) than counties with the most (>70%) forest cover.These results quantify urbanization as a risk factor for WNV disease incidence and are consistent with knowledge of vector species in this area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA.

ABSTRACT
Since 1999, West Nile virus (WNV) disease has affected the northeastern United States. To describe the spatial epidemiology and identify risk factors for disease incidence, we analyzed 8 years (1999-2006) of county-based human WNV disease surveillance data. Among the 56.6 million residents in 8 northeastern states sharing primary enzootic vectors, we found 977 cases. We controlled for population density and potential bias from surveillance and spatial proximity. Analyses demonstrated significant spatial spreading from 1999 through 2004 (p<0.01, r2 = 0.16). A significant trend was apparent among increasingly urban counties; county quartiles with the least (<38%) forest cover had 4.4-fold greater odds (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-13.2, p = 0.01) of having above-median disease incidence (>0.75 cases/100,000 residents) than counties with the most (>70%) forest cover. These results quantify urbanization as a risk factor for WNV disease incidence and are consistent with knowledge of vector species in this area.

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Incidence of human West Nile virus disease cases in 8 northeastern states, 1999–2006. Deviation ellipses indicate 1 SD of the geographic mean yearly incidence calculated as the incidence weighted average in space for each county. Incidence is attributed to the county centroid. This graph shows the urban concentration along the Eastern Seaboard as well as the outliers in western Pennsylvania (1 case in counties with low populations). The 2005 and 2006 regression of the geographic mean incidence is also depicted.
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Figure 3: Incidence of human West Nile virus disease cases in 8 northeastern states, 1999–2006. Deviation ellipses indicate 1 SD of the geographic mean yearly incidence calculated as the incidence weighted average in space for each county. Incidence is attributed to the county centroid. This graph shows the urban concentration along the Eastern Seaboard as well as the outliers in western Pennsylvania (1 case in counties with low populations). The 2005 and 2006 regression of the geographic mean incidence is also depicted.

Mentions: A cursory examination of the epidemic curve of WNV cases reported from each state during the 8-year study indicated that peak incidence was broadly overlapping in all states (Figure 2, panel A). However, cumulative distribution functions of total WNV cases (Figure 2, panel B) by year indicated that New York experienced its median case earlier in the regional epidemic than did other states (Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Connecticut), which suggests a spatiotemporal spread of WNV. Because a spatial component to spread was evident, we evaluated distance between counties to assess the spatial relationship between counties and to control for the effect of spatial proximity. The spatial component alone explained 15% of the variance in time to first case when Queens, New York, was used as the origin (n = 123 counties with cases reported, p = 0.001). After 2004, no new counties reported WNV cases, and the incidence centroids of cases in 2005 and 2006 were close to one another and had shifted back toward the origin, which suggests that the disease may have reached endemicity in the region (Figure 3).


Ecological factors associated with West Nile virus transmission, northeastern United States.

Brown HE, Childs JE, Diuk-Wasser MA, Fish D - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Incidence of human West Nile virus disease cases in 8 northeastern states, 1999–2006. Deviation ellipses indicate 1 SD of the geographic mean yearly incidence calculated as the incidence weighted average in space for each county. Incidence is attributed to the county centroid. This graph shows the urban concentration along the Eastern Seaboard as well as the outliers in western Pennsylvania (1 case in counties with low populations). The 2005 and 2006 regression of the geographic mean incidence is also depicted.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2609885&req=5

Figure 3: Incidence of human West Nile virus disease cases in 8 northeastern states, 1999–2006. Deviation ellipses indicate 1 SD of the geographic mean yearly incidence calculated as the incidence weighted average in space for each county. Incidence is attributed to the county centroid. This graph shows the urban concentration along the Eastern Seaboard as well as the outliers in western Pennsylvania (1 case in counties with low populations). The 2005 and 2006 regression of the geographic mean incidence is also depicted.
Mentions: A cursory examination of the epidemic curve of WNV cases reported from each state during the 8-year study indicated that peak incidence was broadly overlapping in all states (Figure 2, panel A). However, cumulative distribution functions of total WNV cases (Figure 2, panel B) by year indicated that New York experienced its median case earlier in the regional epidemic than did other states (Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Connecticut), which suggests a spatiotemporal spread of WNV. Because a spatial component to spread was evident, we evaluated distance between counties to assess the spatial relationship between counties and to control for the effect of spatial proximity. The spatial component alone explained 15% of the variance in time to first case when Queens, New York, was used as the origin (n = 123 counties with cases reported, p = 0.001). After 2004, no new counties reported WNV cases, and the incidence centroids of cases in 2005 and 2006 were close to one another and had shifted back toward the origin, which suggests that the disease may have reached endemicity in the region (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Among the 56.6 million residents in 8 northeastern states sharing primary enzootic vectors, we found 977 cases.A significant trend was apparent among increasingly urban counties; county quartiles with the least (<38%) forest cover had 4.4-fold greater odds (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-13.2, p = 0.01) of having above-median disease incidence (>0.75 cases/100,000 residents) than counties with the most (>70%) forest cover.These results quantify urbanization as a risk factor for WNV disease incidence and are consistent with knowledge of vector species in this area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA.

ABSTRACT
Since 1999, West Nile virus (WNV) disease has affected the northeastern United States. To describe the spatial epidemiology and identify risk factors for disease incidence, we analyzed 8 years (1999-2006) of county-based human WNV disease surveillance data. Among the 56.6 million residents in 8 northeastern states sharing primary enzootic vectors, we found 977 cases. We controlled for population density and potential bias from surveillance and spatial proximity. Analyses demonstrated significant spatial spreading from 1999 through 2004 (p<0.01, r2 = 0.16). A significant trend was apparent among increasingly urban counties; county quartiles with the least (<38%) forest cover had 4.4-fold greater odds (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-13.2, p = 0.01) of having above-median disease incidence (>0.75 cases/100,000 residents) than counties with the most (>70%) forest cover. These results quantify urbanization as a risk factor for WNV disease incidence and are consistent with knowledge of vector species in this area.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus