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Deaths from norovirus among the elderly, England and Wales.

Harris JP, Edmunds WJ, Pebody R, Brown DW, Lopman BA - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: The number of deaths in England and Wales associated with gastrointestinal pathogens, norovirus in particular, in persons >or=65 years was estimated for 2001-2006.Data came from the Office of National Statistics (death registrations from local registrars) and from the Health Protection Agency (laboratory results).An estimated 80 deaths each year in this age group may be associated with norovirus infection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Infections, GEZI, Health Protection Agency, London, UK. john.harris@hpa.org.uk

ABSTRACT
The number of deaths in England and Wales associated with gastrointestinal pathogens, norovirus in particular, in persons >or=65 years was estimated for 2001-2006. Regression analysis was used to model monthly counts of gastrointestinal pathogens in fecal samples from infected patients against monthly counts of deaths from infectious and noninfectious intestinal diseases. Data came from the Office of National Statistics (death registrations from local registrars) and from the Health Protection Agency (laboratory results). Model results suggest that 20% (13.3%-26.8%) of deaths in persons >or=65 years of age caused by infectious intestinal disease other than Clostridium difficile were associated with norovirus infection in this period and that 13% (7.5%-18.5%) of deaths caused by noninfectious intestinal disease were associated with norovirus. An estimated 80 deaths each year in this age group may be associated with norovirus infection.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Ratio of viral gastroenteritis–associated death reports to norovirus laboratory reports, 5 seasons.
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Figure 4: Ratio of viral gastroenteritis–associated death reports to norovirus laboratory reports, 5 seasons.

Mentions: In years with high seasonal activity, numbers of norovirus-associated deaths were higher. The overall death/laboratory report ratio for 2001–2006 was 55/1,000 (95% confidence interval [CI] 51–60). The ratio did not increase in the years with greater numbers of deaths (Figure 4), and we found no evidence that the ratio was significantly higher during any of the study years. The 2002–03 season had the lowest death/laboratory report ratio. Including an interaction term in the infectious ID model between the epidemic 2002–03 season and laboratory reports of norovirus resulted in a negative-coefficient interaction term (likelihood ratio test p value = 0.002). This finding suggests a lower death/laboratory report ratio in the 2002–03 season, contrary to the hypothesis we were testing. The relative risk for death in the 2002–03 season compared with all other seasons was 0.81 (95% CI 0.69–0.96, p = 0.016).


Deaths from norovirus among the elderly, England and Wales.

Harris JP, Edmunds WJ, Pebody R, Brown DW, Lopman BA - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Ratio of viral gastroenteritis–associated death reports to norovirus laboratory reports, 5 seasons.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2609872&req=5

Figure 4: Ratio of viral gastroenteritis–associated death reports to norovirus laboratory reports, 5 seasons.
Mentions: In years with high seasonal activity, numbers of norovirus-associated deaths were higher. The overall death/laboratory report ratio for 2001–2006 was 55/1,000 (95% confidence interval [CI] 51–60). The ratio did not increase in the years with greater numbers of deaths (Figure 4), and we found no evidence that the ratio was significantly higher during any of the study years. The 2002–03 season had the lowest death/laboratory report ratio. Including an interaction term in the infectious ID model between the epidemic 2002–03 season and laboratory reports of norovirus resulted in a negative-coefficient interaction term (likelihood ratio test p value = 0.002). This finding suggests a lower death/laboratory report ratio in the 2002–03 season, contrary to the hypothesis we were testing. The relative risk for death in the 2002–03 season compared with all other seasons was 0.81 (95% CI 0.69–0.96, p = 0.016).

Bottom Line: The number of deaths in England and Wales associated with gastrointestinal pathogens, norovirus in particular, in persons >or=65 years was estimated for 2001-2006.Data came from the Office of National Statistics (death registrations from local registrars) and from the Health Protection Agency (laboratory results).An estimated 80 deaths each year in this age group may be associated with norovirus infection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Infections, GEZI, Health Protection Agency, London, UK. john.harris@hpa.org.uk

ABSTRACT
The number of deaths in England and Wales associated with gastrointestinal pathogens, norovirus in particular, in persons >or=65 years was estimated for 2001-2006. Regression analysis was used to model monthly counts of gastrointestinal pathogens in fecal samples from infected patients against monthly counts of deaths from infectious and noninfectious intestinal diseases. Data came from the Office of National Statistics (death registrations from local registrars) and from the Health Protection Agency (laboratory results). Model results suggest that 20% (13.3%-26.8%) of deaths in persons >or=65 years of age caused by infectious intestinal disease other than Clostridium difficile were associated with norovirus infection in this period and that 13% (7.5%-18.5%) of deaths caused by noninfectious intestinal disease were associated with norovirus. An estimated 80 deaths each year in this age group may be associated with norovirus infection.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus