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Collage and assemblage in the microbial world.

Potter P - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA. PMP1@cdc.gov

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“There are two problems in painting” said American artist Frank Stella (b. 1936) when he was still a brash young man. “One is to find out what painting is, and the other is to find out how to make a painting”... Atlanta artist Eric Mack, a man of his times, is part of the contemporary scene and its pressures to create a painting... These bits and pieces of objects, punctuated by a painted eyeball here, a peacock feather there, are laboriously integrated into a fluid backdrop of color applied by brush or aerosol... The effect refers to recent traditions, among them abstract expressionism, pop, and graffiti. “She got me those clippers and told me that once I learned to cut hair,” Mack says of his mother, a cosmetologist, “I would never have to worry about going hungry. ” His career as barber flourished throughout his years at the Atlanta College of Art, when he was co-owner of “Barber’s Edge” on Buford Highway, the city’s bustling multiethnic corridor where he tended all styles and customers: “Flattops, fades, skin fades, shadow fades, babies to old people, black, white, Chinese, Mexican, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Africans, anyone who has hair. ” But his artistic career started much earlier, “I remember different breakdancing moves like the Windmill that you could do... As an art student, he met and was influenced by another Atlanta artist, Charles Nelson, who encouraged him to move from illustration to painting. “I was too intimidated by the brush... Newly acquired genes transformed it into a virulent microbe that also destroys kidneys and erythrocytes... Diversification in some strains of group A streptococci, common bacteria that normally do not cause disease in humans, is causing the reemergence of a severe form of invasive disease... Collage and assemblage, which work so well in Mack’s art, mirror microbial activity that can cause havoc in the global community... Like the artist’s bits of objects, microbial ultrastructures can reassort, recombine, and reassemble into brand new entities... Their plasticity frustrates vaccine development, and they become resistant to even the most potent drugs... For all its apparent fragmentation, Mack’s vision is universal and positive... The reassembled objects form a new working composite... But the microbial equivalent is still a puzzle seeking solution in science’s mixed media: new technologic bits and pieces (vaccines, drugs, diagnostic tools) arranged against crowding and social, political, and economic stratification.

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Eric Mack (b. 1976) APMR-41553 (2007) Mixed media on canvas (182.8 cm × 91.4 cm) Used with permission of the artist. Photo by Fay Gold Gallery, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
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Fa: Eric Mack (b. 1976) APMR-41553 (2007) Mixed media on canvas (182.8 cm × 91.4 cm) Used with permission of the artist. Photo by Fay Gold Gallery, Atlanta, Georgia, USA


Collage and assemblage in the microbial world.

Potter P - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Eric Mack (b. 1976) APMR-41553 (2007) Mixed media on canvas (182.8 cm × 91.4 cm) Used with permission of the artist. Photo by Fay Gold Gallery, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2609871&req=5

Fa: Eric Mack (b. 1976) APMR-41553 (2007) Mixed media on canvas (182.8 cm × 91.4 cm) Used with permission of the artist. Photo by Fay Gold Gallery, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA. PMP1@cdc.gov

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

“There are two problems in painting” said American artist Frank Stella (b. 1936) when he was still a brash young man. “One is to find out what painting is, and the other is to find out how to make a painting”... Atlanta artist Eric Mack, a man of his times, is part of the contemporary scene and its pressures to create a painting... These bits and pieces of objects, punctuated by a painted eyeball here, a peacock feather there, are laboriously integrated into a fluid backdrop of color applied by brush or aerosol... The effect refers to recent traditions, among them abstract expressionism, pop, and graffiti. “She got me those clippers and told me that once I learned to cut hair,” Mack says of his mother, a cosmetologist, “I would never have to worry about going hungry. ” His career as barber flourished throughout his years at the Atlanta College of Art, when he was co-owner of “Barber’s Edge” on Buford Highway, the city’s bustling multiethnic corridor where he tended all styles and customers: “Flattops, fades, skin fades, shadow fades, babies to old people, black, white, Chinese, Mexican, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Africans, anyone who has hair. ” But his artistic career started much earlier, “I remember different breakdancing moves like the Windmill that you could do... As an art student, he met and was influenced by another Atlanta artist, Charles Nelson, who encouraged him to move from illustration to painting. “I was too intimidated by the brush... Newly acquired genes transformed it into a virulent microbe that also destroys kidneys and erythrocytes... Diversification in some strains of group A streptococci, common bacteria that normally do not cause disease in humans, is causing the reemergence of a severe form of invasive disease... Collage and assemblage, which work so well in Mack’s art, mirror microbial activity that can cause havoc in the global community... Like the artist’s bits of objects, microbial ultrastructures can reassort, recombine, and reassemble into brand new entities... Their plasticity frustrates vaccine development, and they become resistant to even the most potent drugs... For all its apparent fragmentation, Mack’s vision is universal and positive... The reassembled objects form a new working composite... But the microbial equivalent is still a puzzle seeking solution in science’s mixed media: new technologic bits and pieces (vaccines, drugs, diagnostic tools) arranged against crowding and social, political, and economic stratification.

Show MeSH