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Pandemic influenza and excess intensive-care workload.

Nap RE, Andriessen MP, Meessen NE, Miranda Ddos R, van der Werf TS - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: Using various published scenarios, we estimate their effect in increasing the availability of healthcare workers for duty during a pandemic.We show that even during the peak of the pandemic, all patients requiring hospital and ICU admission can be served, including those who have non-influenza-related conditions.For this rigorous task differentiation, clear hierarchical management, unambiguous communication, and discipline are essential and we recommend informing and training non-ICU healthcare workers for duties in the ICU.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. r.e.nap@rvb.umcg.nl

ABSTRACT
In The Netherlands a major part of preparedness planning for an epidemic or pandemic consists of maintaining essential public services, e.g., by the police, fire departments, army personnel, and healthcare workers. We provide estimates for peak demand for healthcare workers, factoring in healthcare worker absenteeism and using estimates from published epidemiologic models on the expected evolution of pandemic influenza in relation to the impact on peak surge capacity of healthcare facilities and intensive care units (ICUs). Using various published scenarios, we estimate their effect in increasing the availability of healthcare workers for duty during a pandemic. We show that even during the peak of the pandemic, all patients requiring hospital and ICU admission can be served, including those who have non-influenza-related conditions. For this rigorous task differentiation, clear hierarchical management, unambiguous communication, and discipline are essential and we recommend informing and training non-ICU healthcare workers for duties in the ICU.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

A) Amount of Nine Equivalents of Nursing Manpower use (NEMS) points needed and available by 25% and 50% admission rate in the intensive care unit (ICU) scenario 1, expanding healthcare worker (HCW) work hours from 8 to 12 h per 24 h (pandemic period 9 wk). B) Amount of NEMS points needed and available by 25% and 50% admission rate in ICU scenario 1, expanding HCW work hours from 8 to 12 h per 24 h (pandemic period 14 wk).
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Figure 1: A) Amount of Nine Equivalents of Nursing Manpower use (NEMS) points needed and available by 25% and 50% admission rate in the intensive care unit (ICU) scenario 1, expanding healthcare worker (HCW) work hours from 8 to 12 h per 24 h (pandemic period 9 wk). B) Amount of NEMS points needed and available by 25% and 50% admission rate in ICU scenario 1, expanding HCW work hours from 8 to 12 h per 24 h (pandemic period 14 wk).

Mentions: In Figure 1, panels A and B, the results are given for the model length of stay of 15 days, with 25% and 50% ICU admission rates with and without AVM. Even in the worst case scenario, a 15-day length of stay without availability of AVM for the individual patient (Figure 1, panel A), no staff shortage appears. The models for a length of stay of 8 days, 25% and 50% ICU admission with and without AVM (not shown), show no staff shortage over time.


Pandemic influenza and excess intensive-care workload.

Nap RE, Andriessen MP, Meessen NE, Miranda Ddos R, van der Werf TS - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

A) Amount of Nine Equivalents of Nursing Manpower use (NEMS) points needed and available by 25% and 50% admission rate in the intensive care unit (ICU) scenario 1, expanding healthcare worker (HCW) work hours from 8 to 12 h per 24 h (pandemic period 9 wk). B) Amount of NEMS points needed and available by 25% and 50% admission rate in ICU scenario 1, expanding HCW work hours from 8 to 12 h per 24 h (pandemic period 14 wk).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2609860&req=5

Figure 1: A) Amount of Nine Equivalents of Nursing Manpower use (NEMS) points needed and available by 25% and 50% admission rate in the intensive care unit (ICU) scenario 1, expanding healthcare worker (HCW) work hours from 8 to 12 h per 24 h (pandemic period 9 wk). B) Amount of NEMS points needed and available by 25% and 50% admission rate in ICU scenario 1, expanding HCW work hours from 8 to 12 h per 24 h (pandemic period 14 wk).
Mentions: In Figure 1, panels A and B, the results are given for the model length of stay of 15 days, with 25% and 50% ICU admission rates with and without AVM. Even in the worst case scenario, a 15-day length of stay without availability of AVM for the individual patient (Figure 1, panel A), no staff shortage appears. The models for a length of stay of 8 days, 25% and 50% ICU admission with and without AVM (not shown), show no staff shortage over time.

Bottom Line: Using various published scenarios, we estimate their effect in increasing the availability of healthcare workers for duty during a pandemic.We show that even during the peak of the pandemic, all patients requiring hospital and ICU admission can be served, including those who have non-influenza-related conditions.For this rigorous task differentiation, clear hierarchical management, unambiguous communication, and discipline are essential and we recommend informing and training non-ICU healthcare workers for duties in the ICU.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. r.e.nap@rvb.umcg.nl

ABSTRACT
In The Netherlands a major part of preparedness planning for an epidemic or pandemic consists of maintaining essential public services, e.g., by the police, fire departments, army personnel, and healthcare workers. We provide estimates for peak demand for healthcare workers, factoring in healthcare worker absenteeism and using estimates from published epidemiologic models on the expected evolution of pandemic influenza in relation to the impact on peak surge capacity of healthcare facilities and intensive care units (ICUs). Using various published scenarios, we estimate their effect in increasing the availability of healthcare workers for duty during a pandemic. We show that even during the peak of the pandemic, all patients requiring hospital and ICU admission can be served, including those who have non-influenza-related conditions. For this rigorous task differentiation, clear hierarchical management, unambiguous communication, and discipline are essential and we recommend informing and training non-ICU healthcare workers for duties in the ICU.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus