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Portal vein glucose sensors do not play a major role in modulating physiological responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia in humans.

Rossetti P, Porcellati F, Lucidi P, Busciantella Ricci N, Candeloro P, Cioli P, Santeusanio F, Bolli GB, Fanelli CG - Diabetes (2008)

Bottom Line: However, their role in modulating these responses in humans is not well understood.The Stroop color and colored words subtest of the Stroop test deteriorated less (P < 0.05) with glucose than placebo.In contrast to animals, in humans, prevention of portal hypoglycemia with oral glucose from the beginning of insulin-induced slow-fall hypoglycemia has no effect on sympathoadrenal and symptomatic responses to hypoglycemia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Experimental data from animal studies indicate that portal vein glucose sensors play a key role in the responses to slow-fall hypoglycemia. However, their role in modulating these responses in humans is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to examine in humans the potential role of portal vein glucose sensors in physiological responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia mimicking the slow fall of insulin-treated diabetic subjects.

Research design and methods: Ten nondiabetic subjects were studied on two different occasions during intravenous insulin (2 mU . kg(-1) . min(-1)) plus variable glucose for 160 minutes. In both studies, after 60 min of normal plasma glucose concentrations, hypoglycemia (47 mg/dl) was induced slowly (60 min) and maintained for 60 min. Hypoglycemia was preceded by the ingestion of either oral placebo or glucose (28 g) given at 30 min.

Results: Plasma glucose and insulin were not different with either placebo or glucose (P > 0.2). Similarly, counterregulatory hormones, substrates, and symptoms were not different with either placebo or glucose. The Stroop color and colored words subtest of the Stroop test deteriorated less (P < 0.05) with glucose than placebo.

Conclusions: In contrast to animals, in humans, prevention of portal hypoglycemia with oral glucose from the beginning of insulin-induced slow-fall hypoglycemia has no effect on sympathoadrenal and symptomatic responses to hypoglycemia.

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Total, autonomic, and neuroglycopenic symptom and adrenergic and cholinergic symptom scores during clamped hypoglycemia both with placebo (•) and oral glucose (○). PG, plasma glucose.
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f4: Total, autonomic, and neuroglycopenic symptom and adrenergic and cholinergic symptom scores during clamped hypoglycemia both with placebo (•) and oral glucose (○). PG, plasma glucose.

Mentions: Symptom scores increased during hypoglycemia during both placebo and glucose studies. However, mean and peak values for total, autonomic, neuroglycopenic, adrenergic, and cholinergic symptom scores were not different between studies (P > 0.2 for all comparisons) (Fig. 4).


Portal vein glucose sensors do not play a major role in modulating physiological responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia in humans.

Rossetti P, Porcellati F, Lucidi P, Busciantella Ricci N, Candeloro P, Cioli P, Santeusanio F, Bolli GB, Fanelli CG - Diabetes (2008)

Total, autonomic, and neuroglycopenic symptom and adrenergic and cholinergic symptom scores during clamped hypoglycemia both with placebo (•) and oral glucose (○). PG, plasma glucose.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2606871&req=5

f4: Total, autonomic, and neuroglycopenic symptom and adrenergic and cholinergic symptom scores during clamped hypoglycemia both with placebo (•) and oral glucose (○). PG, plasma glucose.
Mentions: Symptom scores increased during hypoglycemia during both placebo and glucose studies. However, mean and peak values for total, autonomic, neuroglycopenic, adrenergic, and cholinergic symptom scores were not different between studies (P > 0.2 for all comparisons) (Fig. 4).

Bottom Line: However, their role in modulating these responses in humans is not well understood.The Stroop color and colored words subtest of the Stroop test deteriorated less (P < 0.05) with glucose than placebo.In contrast to animals, in humans, prevention of portal hypoglycemia with oral glucose from the beginning of insulin-induced slow-fall hypoglycemia has no effect on sympathoadrenal and symptomatic responses to hypoglycemia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Experimental data from animal studies indicate that portal vein glucose sensors play a key role in the responses to slow-fall hypoglycemia. However, their role in modulating these responses in humans is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to examine in humans the potential role of portal vein glucose sensors in physiological responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia mimicking the slow fall of insulin-treated diabetic subjects.

Research design and methods: Ten nondiabetic subjects were studied on two different occasions during intravenous insulin (2 mU . kg(-1) . min(-1)) plus variable glucose for 160 minutes. In both studies, after 60 min of normal plasma glucose concentrations, hypoglycemia (47 mg/dl) was induced slowly (60 min) and maintained for 60 min. Hypoglycemia was preceded by the ingestion of either oral placebo or glucose (28 g) given at 30 min.

Results: Plasma glucose and insulin were not different with either placebo or glucose (P > 0.2). Similarly, counterregulatory hormones, substrates, and symptoms were not different with either placebo or glucose. The Stroop color and colored words subtest of the Stroop test deteriorated less (P < 0.05) with glucose than placebo.

Conclusions: In contrast to animals, in humans, prevention of portal hypoglycemia with oral glucose from the beginning of insulin-induced slow-fall hypoglycemia has no effect on sympathoadrenal and symptomatic responses to hypoglycemia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus