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Simultaneous idiopathic segmental infarction of the great omentum and acute appendicitis: a rare association.

Battaglia L, Belli F, Vannelli A, Bonfanti G, Gallino G, Poiasina E, Rampa M, Vitellaro M, Leo E - World J Emerg Surg (2008)

Bottom Line: Idiopathic segmental infarction of the greater omentum is an uncommon cause of acute abdomen.We present a case of a 47-year old woman without significant previous medical history, admitted with an acute abdomen, in which the clinical diagnosis was acute appendicitis and in whom an infarcted segment of right side of the greater omentum was also found at laparotomy.As the etiology is unknown, we highlighted some of the possible theories, and emphasize the importance of omental infarction even in the presence of acute appendicitis as a coincident intraperitoneal pathological condition.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Colo-rectal Cancer Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Fondazione IRCCS "Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori", via Venezian, 1 - Milan, 20133, Italy . luigi.battaglia@istitutotumori.mi.it.

ABSTRACT
Idiopathic segmental infarction of the greater omentum is an uncommon cause of acute abdomen. The etiology is still unclear and the symptoms mimic acute appendicitis. Its presentation simultaneously with acute appendicitis is still more infrequent. We present a case of a 47-year old woman without significant previous medical history, admitted with an acute abdomen, in which the clinical diagnosis was acute appendicitis and in whom an infarcted segment of right side of the greater omentum was also found at laparotomy. As the etiology is unknown, we highlighted some of the possible theories, and emphasize the importance of omental infarction even in the presence of acute appendicitis as a coincident intraperitoneal pathological condition.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Macroscopical appearance of the infarcted area of the greater omentum found during laparotomy for acute appendicitis. Note the change in color and edema of the omental fat (arrows).
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Figure 1: Macroscopical appearance of the infarcted area of the greater omentum found during laparotomy for acute appendicitis. Note the change in color and edema of the omental fat (arrows).

Mentions: Surgery was performed through a right pararectal incision in order to allow a good examination of the of the ceco-appendicular and surrounding area. At surgery, the omentum was found to be grossly dark and thickened. Adhesions between the greater omentum and the right abdominal wall were seen. Further exploration revealed infarction without torsion of the right segment of the greater omentum localized at the inferior right quadrant region in an area of approximately 120 cm2 (10 cm per 12 cm) (Fig. 1). The appendix was edematous and erythematous macroscopically, located in a preileal position. A small amount of serosanguineous fluid was seen at the right iliac fossa region.


Simultaneous idiopathic segmental infarction of the great omentum and acute appendicitis: a rare association.

Battaglia L, Belli F, Vannelli A, Bonfanti G, Gallino G, Poiasina E, Rampa M, Vitellaro M, Leo E - World J Emerg Surg (2008)

Macroscopical appearance of the infarcted area of the greater omentum found during laparotomy for acute appendicitis. Note the change in color and edema of the omental fat (arrows).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2605737&req=5

Figure 1: Macroscopical appearance of the infarcted area of the greater omentum found during laparotomy for acute appendicitis. Note the change in color and edema of the omental fat (arrows).
Mentions: Surgery was performed through a right pararectal incision in order to allow a good examination of the of the ceco-appendicular and surrounding area. At surgery, the omentum was found to be grossly dark and thickened. Adhesions between the greater omentum and the right abdominal wall were seen. Further exploration revealed infarction without torsion of the right segment of the greater omentum localized at the inferior right quadrant region in an area of approximately 120 cm2 (10 cm per 12 cm) (Fig. 1). The appendix was edematous and erythematous macroscopically, located in a preileal position. A small amount of serosanguineous fluid was seen at the right iliac fossa region.

Bottom Line: Idiopathic segmental infarction of the greater omentum is an uncommon cause of acute abdomen.We present a case of a 47-year old woman without significant previous medical history, admitted with an acute abdomen, in which the clinical diagnosis was acute appendicitis and in whom an infarcted segment of right side of the greater omentum was also found at laparotomy.As the etiology is unknown, we highlighted some of the possible theories, and emphasize the importance of omental infarction even in the presence of acute appendicitis as a coincident intraperitoneal pathological condition.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Colo-rectal Cancer Surgery Unit, Department of Surgery, Fondazione IRCCS "Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori", via Venezian, 1 - Milan, 20133, Italy . luigi.battaglia@istitutotumori.mi.it.

ABSTRACT
Idiopathic segmental infarction of the greater omentum is an uncommon cause of acute abdomen. The etiology is still unclear and the symptoms mimic acute appendicitis. Its presentation simultaneously with acute appendicitis is still more infrequent. We present a case of a 47-year old woman without significant previous medical history, admitted with an acute abdomen, in which the clinical diagnosis was acute appendicitis and in whom an infarcted segment of right side of the greater omentum was also found at laparotomy. As the etiology is unknown, we highlighted some of the possible theories, and emphasize the importance of omental infarction even in the presence of acute appendicitis as a coincident intraperitoneal pathological condition.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus