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Association between infant feeding patterns and diarrhoeal and respiratory illness: a cohort study in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

Mihrshahi S, Oddy WH, Peat JK, Kabir I - Int Breastfeed J (2008)

Bottom Line: Prevalences were compared using chi-squared tests and logistic regression.Similarly, although there was a large difference in prevalence in acute respiratory illness between exclusively [54.2% (95%CI 46.6, 61.8)] and predominantly breastfed infants [70.4% (95%CI 53.2, 87.6)] there was no significant difference in the prevalence (p = 0.17).The findings suggest that exclusive or predominant breastfeeding can reduce rates of morbidity significantly in this region of rural Bangladesh.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia. smihrshahi@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Background: In developing countries, infectious diseases such as diarrhoea and acute respiratory infections are the main cause of mortality and morbidity in infants aged less than one year. The importance of exclusive breastfeeding in the prevention of infectious diseases during infancy is well known. Although breastfeeding is almost universal in Bangladesh, the rates of exclusive breastfeeding remain low. This cohort study was designed to compare the prevalence of diarrhoea and acute respiratory infection (ARI) in infants according to their breastfeeding status in a prospective cohort of infants from birth to six months of age.

Methods: A total of 351 pregnant women were recruited in the Anowara subdistrict of Chittagong. Breastfeeding practices and the 7-day prevalence of diarrhoea and ARI were recorded at monthly home visits. Prevalences were compared using chi-squared tests and logistic regression.

Results: A total of 272 mother-infant pairs completed the study to six months. Infants who were exclusively breastfed for six months had a significantly lower 7-day prevalence of diarrhoea [AOR for lack of EBF = 2.50 (95%CI 1.10, 5.69), p = 0.03] and a significantly lower 7-day prevalence of ARI [AOR for lack of EBF = 2.31 (95%CI 1.33, 4.00), p < 0.01] than infants who were not exclusively breastfed. However, when the association between patterns of infant feeding (exclusive, predominant and partial breastfeeding) and illness was investigated in more detail, there was no significant difference in the prevalence of diarrhoea between exclusively [6.6% (95% CI 2.8, 10.4)] and predominantly breastfed infants [3.7% (95% CI 0.09, 18.3), (p = 0.56)]. Partially breastfed infants had a higher prevalence of diarrhoea than the others [19.2% (95% CI 10.4, 27.9), (p = 0.01)]. Similarly, although there was a large difference in prevalence in acute respiratory illness between exclusively [54.2% (95%CI 46.6, 61.8)] and predominantly breastfed infants [70.4% (95%CI 53.2, 87.6)] there was no significant difference in the prevalence (p = 0.17).

Conclusion: The findings suggest that exclusive or predominant breastfeeding can reduce rates of morbidity significantly in this region of rural Bangladesh.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Chittagong cohort study trial profile.
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Figure 1: Chittagong cohort study trial profile.

Mentions: A total of 351 pregnant women were recruited and 272 mother infant pairs completed the study to six months (Figure 1). Pregnant women aged 16–35 years, with no more than three living children or a parity of five, who intended to deliver and stay in the study area were asked to participate. Women with documented heart disease, insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, or eclampsia during the previous pregnancy were excluded. Infants were excluded from the study if they had congenital abnormalities; were admitted to intensive care after birth; were twins/triplets or had weight below 1800 g on the fourth day after birth.


Association between infant feeding patterns and diarrhoeal and respiratory illness: a cohort study in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

Mihrshahi S, Oddy WH, Peat JK, Kabir I - Int Breastfeed J (2008)

Chittagong cohort study trial profile.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2605736&req=5

Figure 1: Chittagong cohort study trial profile.
Mentions: A total of 351 pregnant women were recruited and 272 mother infant pairs completed the study to six months (Figure 1). Pregnant women aged 16–35 years, with no more than three living children or a parity of five, who intended to deliver and stay in the study area were asked to participate. Women with documented heart disease, insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, or eclampsia during the previous pregnancy were excluded. Infants were excluded from the study if they had congenital abnormalities; were admitted to intensive care after birth; were twins/triplets or had weight below 1800 g on the fourth day after birth.

Bottom Line: Prevalences were compared using chi-squared tests and logistic regression.Similarly, although there was a large difference in prevalence in acute respiratory illness between exclusively [54.2% (95%CI 46.6, 61.8)] and predominantly breastfed infants [70.4% (95%CI 53.2, 87.6)] there was no significant difference in the prevalence (p = 0.17).The findings suggest that exclusive or predominant breastfeeding can reduce rates of morbidity significantly in this region of rural Bangladesh.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia. smihrshahi@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Background: In developing countries, infectious diseases such as diarrhoea and acute respiratory infections are the main cause of mortality and morbidity in infants aged less than one year. The importance of exclusive breastfeeding in the prevention of infectious diseases during infancy is well known. Although breastfeeding is almost universal in Bangladesh, the rates of exclusive breastfeeding remain low. This cohort study was designed to compare the prevalence of diarrhoea and acute respiratory infection (ARI) in infants according to their breastfeeding status in a prospective cohort of infants from birth to six months of age.

Methods: A total of 351 pregnant women were recruited in the Anowara subdistrict of Chittagong. Breastfeeding practices and the 7-day prevalence of diarrhoea and ARI were recorded at monthly home visits. Prevalences were compared using chi-squared tests and logistic regression.

Results: A total of 272 mother-infant pairs completed the study to six months. Infants who were exclusively breastfed for six months had a significantly lower 7-day prevalence of diarrhoea [AOR for lack of EBF = 2.50 (95%CI 1.10, 5.69), p = 0.03] and a significantly lower 7-day prevalence of ARI [AOR for lack of EBF = 2.31 (95%CI 1.33, 4.00), p < 0.01] than infants who were not exclusively breastfed. However, when the association between patterns of infant feeding (exclusive, predominant and partial breastfeeding) and illness was investigated in more detail, there was no significant difference in the prevalence of diarrhoea between exclusively [6.6% (95% CI 2.8, 10.4)] and predominantly breastfed infants [3.7% (95% CI 0.09, 18.3), (p = 0.56)]. Partially breastfed infants had a higher prevalence of diarrhoea than the others [19.2% (95% CI 10.4, 27.9), (p = 0.01)]. Similarly, although there was a large difference in prevalence in acute respiratory illness between exclusively [54.2% (95%CI 46.6, 61.8)] and predominantly breastfed infants [70.4% (95%CI 53.2, 87.6)] there was no significant difference in the prevalence (p = 0.17).

Conclusion: The findings suggest that exclusive or predominant breastfeeding can reduce rates of morbidity significantly in this region of rural Bangladesh.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus