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Home range utilisation and territorial behaviour of lions (Panthera leo) on Karongwe Game Reserve, South Africa.

Lehmann MB, Funston PJ, Owen CR, Slotow R - PLoS ONE (2008)

Bottom Line: Male ranging behaviour was not affected by coalition size, being driven more by resource rather than social factors.The females responded to the lions on the adjacent reserve by avoiding the area closest to them, therefore females may be more driven by social factors.Home range size and the resource response to water are important factors to consider when reintroducing lions to a small reserve, and it is hoped that these findings lead to other similar studies which will contribute to sound decisions regarding the management of lions on small reserves.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nature Conservation, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
Interventionist conservation management of territorial large carnivores has increased in recent years, especially in South Africa. Understanding of spatial ecology is an important component of predator conservation and management. Spatial patterns are influenced by many, often interacting, factors making elucidation of key drivers difficult. We had the opportunity to study a simplified system, a single pride of lions (Panthera leo) after reintroduction onto the 85 km(2) Karongwe Game Reserve, from 1999-2005, using radio-telemetry. In 2002 one male was removed from the paired coalition which had been present for the first three years. A second pride and male were in a fenced reserve adjacent of them to the east. This made it possible to separate social and resource factors in both a coalition and single male scenario, and the driving factors these seem to have on spatial ecology. Male ranging behaviour was not affected by coalition size, being driven more by resource rather than social factors. The females responded to the lions on the adjacent reserve by avoiding the area closest to them, therefore females may be more driven by social factors. Home range size and the resource response to water are important factors to consider when reintroducing lions to a small reserve, and it is hoped that these findings lead to other similar studies which will contribute to sound decisions regarding the management of lions on small reserves.

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Spatial distribution of lions.Areas preferred, avoided, or used according to availability for (A) male coalition, (B) single male, (C) females before male was removed, and (D) females after removal of the male. The red line indicates the edge of the 2 km buffer zone from the adjacent lion population to the east.
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pone-0003998-g003: Spatial distribution of lions.Areas preferred, avoided, or used according to availability for (A) male coalition, (B) single male, (C) females before male was removed, and (D) females after removal of the male. The red line indicates the edge of the 2 km buffer zone from the adjacent lion population to the east.

Mentions: The coalition preferred cells scattered around the reserve and spent more time in those areas than the single male did (Fig. 3). The single male preferred areas mostly in the northern half of the reserve, which coincided with the female's preference, and was also along the major drainage lines.


Home range utilisation and territorial behaviour of lions (Panthera leo) on Karongwe Game Reserve, South Africa.

Lehmann MB, Funston PJ, Owen CR, Slotow R - PLoS ONE (2008)

Spatial distribution of lions.Areas preferred, avoided, or used according to availability for (A) male coalition, (B) single male, (C) females before male was removed, and (D) females after removal of the male. The red line indicates the edge of the 2 km buffer zone from the adjacent lion population to the east.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2602599&req=5

pone-0003998-g003: Spatial distribution of lions.Areas preferred, avoided, or used according to availability for (A) male coalition, (B) single male, (C) females before male was removed, and (D) females after removal of the male. The red line indicates the edge of the 2 km buffer zone from the adjacent lion population to the east.
Mentions: The coalition preferred cells scattered around the reserve and spent more time in those areas than the single male did (Fig. 3). The single male preferred areas mostly in the northern half of the reserve, which coincided with the female's preference, and was also along the major drainage lines.

Bottom Line: Male ranging behaviour was not affected by coalition size, being driven more by resource rather than social factors.The females responded to the lions on the adjacent reserve by avoiding the area closest to them, therefore females may be more driven by social factors.Home range size and the resource response to water are important factors to consider when reintroducing lions to a small reserve, and it is hoped that these findings lead to other similar studies which will contribute to sound decisions regarding the management of lions on small reserves.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nature Conservation, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
Interventionist conservation management of territorial large carnivores has increased in recent years, especially in South Africa. Understanding of spatial ecology is an important component of predator conservation and management. Spatial patterns are influenced by many, often interacting, factors making elucidation of key drivers difficult. We had the opportunity to study a simplified system, a single pride of lions (Panthera leo) after reintroduction onto the 85 km(2) Karongwe Game Reserve, from 1999-2005, using radio-telemetry. In 2002 one male was removed from the paired coalition which had been present for the first three years. A second pride and male were in a fenced reserve adjacent of them to the east. This made it possible to separate social and resource factors in both a coalition and single male scenario, and the driving factors these seem to have on spatial ecology. Male ranging behaviour was not affected by coalition size, being driven more by resource rather than social factors. The females responded to the lions on the adjacent reserve by avoiding the area closest to them, therefore females may be more driven by social factors. Home range size and the resource response to water are important factors to consider when reintroducing lions to a small reserve, and it is hoped that these findings lead to other similar studies which will contribute to sound decisions regarding the management of lions on small reserves.

Show MeSH