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Comprehensive warm-up programme to prevent injuries in young female footballers: cluster randomised controlled trial.

Soligard T, Myklebust G, Steffen K, Holme I, Silvers H, Bizzini M, Junge A, Dvorak J, Bahr R, Andersen TE - BMJ (2008)

Bottom Line: To examine the effect of a comprehensive warm-up programme designed to reduce the risk of injuries in female youth football.Though the primary outcome of reduction in lower extremity injury did not reach significance, the risk of severe injuries, overuse injuries, and injuries overall was reduced.ISRCTN10306290.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Oslo Sports Trauma Research Centre, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, PO Box 4014 Ullevaal Stadion, 0806 Oslo, Norway. torbjorn.soligard@nih.no

ABSTRACT

Objective: To examine the effect of a comprehensive warm-up programme designed to reduce the risk of injuries in female youth football.

Design: Cluster randomised controlled trial with clubs as the unit of randomisation.

Setting: 125 football clubs from the south, east, and middle of Norway (65 clusters in the intervention group; 60 in the control group) followed for one league season (eight months).

Participants: 1892 female players aged 13-17 (1055 players in the intervention group; 837 players in the control group).

Intervention: A comprehensive warm-up programme to improve strength, awareness, and neuromuscular control during static and dynamic movements.

Main outcome measure: Injuries to the lower extremity (foot, ankle, lower leg, knee, thigh, groin, and hip).

Results: During one season, 264 players had relevant injuries: 121 players in the intervention group and 143 in the control group (rate ratio 0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.49 to 1.03). In the intervention group there was a significantly lower risk of injuries overall (0.68, 0.48 to 0.98), overuse injuries (0.47, 0.26 to 0.85), and severe injuries (0.55, 0.36 to 0.83).

Conclusion: Though the primary outcome of reduction in lower extremity injury did not reach significance, the risk of severe injuries, overuse injuries, and injuries overall was reduced. This indicates that a structured warm-up programme can prevent injuries in young female football players.

Trial registration: ISRCTN10306290.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Fig 1 Two examples of strength exercises. Top: side plank exercise. Bottom: the “Nordic hamstring lower”
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fig1: Fig 1 Two examples of strength exercises. Top: side plank exercise. Bottom: the “Nordic hamstring lower”

Mentions: An expert group convened by the international football federation (FIFA), with representatives from the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, the Santa Monica Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Research Foundation, and the FIFA Medical Assessment and Research Centre, developed the warm-up programme. Before the start of the study one club tested the programme. It consisted of three parts (table 1). The initial part was running exercises at slow speed combined with active stretching and controlled contacts with a partner. The running course included six to ten pairs of cones (depending on the number of players) about five to six metres apart (length and width). The second part consisted of six different sets of exercises; these included strength (fig 1), balance, and jumping exercises, each with three levels of increasing difficulty. The final part was speed running combined with football specific movements with sudden changes in direction.


Comprehensive warm-up programme to prevent injuries in young female footballers: cluster randomised controlled trial.

Soligard T, Myklebust G, Steffen K, Holme I, Silvers H, Bizzini M, Junge A, Dvorak J, Bahr R, Andersen TE - BMJ (2008)

Fig 1 Two examples of strength exercises. Top: side plank exercise. Bottom: the “Nordic hamstring lower”
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2600961&req=5

fig1: Fig 1 Two examples of strength exercises. Top: side plank exercise. Bottom: the “Nordic hamstring lower”
Mentions: An expert group convened by the international football federation (FIFA), with representatives from the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, the Santa Monica Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Research Foundation, and the FIFA Medical Assessment and Research Centre, developed the warm-up programme. Before the start of the study one club tested the programme. It consisted of three parts (table 1). The initial part was running exercises at slow speed combined with active stretching and controlled contacts with a partner. The running course included six to ten pairs of cones (depending on the number of players) about five to six metres apart (length and width). The second part consisted of six different sets of exercises; these included strength (fig 1), balance, and jumping exercises, each with three levels of increasing difficulty. The final part was speed running combined with football specific movements with sudden changes in direction.

Bottom Line: To examine the effect of a comprehensive warm-up programme designed to reduce the risk of injuries in female youth football.Though the primary outcome of reduction in lower extremity injury did not reach significance, the risk of severe injuries, overuse injuries, and injuries overall was reduced.ISRCTN10306290.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Oslo Sports Trauma Research Centre, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, PO Box 4014 Ullevaal Stadion, 0806 Oslo, Norway. torbjorn.soligard@nih.no

ABSTRACT

Objective: To examine the effect of a comprehensive warm-up programme designed to reduce the risk of injuries in female youth football.

Design: Cluster randomised controlled trial with clubs as the unit of randomisation.

Setting: 125 football clubs from the south, east, and middle of Norway (65 clusters in the intervention group; 60 in the control group) followed for one league season (eight months).

Participants: 1892 female players aged 13-17 (1055 players in the intervention group; 837 players in the control group).

Intervention: A comprehensive warm-up programme to improve strength, awareness, and neuromuscular control during static and dynamic movements.

Main outcome measure: Injuries to the lower extremity (foot, ankle, lower leg, knee, thigh, groin, and hip).

Results: During one season, 264 players had relevant injuries: 121 players in the intervention group and 143 in the control group (rate ratio 0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.49 to 1.03). In the intervention group there was a significantly lower risk of injuries overall (0.68, 0.48 to 0.98), overuse injuries (0.47, 0.26 to 0.85), and severe injuries (0.55, 0.36 to 0.83).

Conclusion: Though the primary outcome of reduction in lower extremity injury did not reach significance, the risk of severe injuries, overuse injuries, and injuries overall was reduced. This indicates that a structured warm-up programme can prevent injuries in young female football players.

Trial registration: ISRCTN10306290.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus