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Body size in early life and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer: results from the Nurses' Health Studies.

Baer HJ, Hankinson SE, Tworoger SS - Br. J. Cancer (2008)

Bottom Line: There was a weak inverse association between average body fatness at ages 5 and 10 and risk in the NHS (RR for heaviest vs most lean=0.81, 95% CI: 0.53-1.24, P for trend=0.04) and a nonsignificant positive association in the NHSII (RR=2.09, 95% CI: 0.98-4.48, P for trend=0.10), possibly due to differences in age and menopausal status.Height was positively associated with risk in both cohorts (RR for >or=1.75 vs <1.6 m=1.43, 95% CI: 1.05-1.96, P for trend=0.001).Further research should examine the biological mechanisms underlying the observed associations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. hbaer@partners.org

ABSTRACT
Adult body mass index (BMI) has been associated with ovarian cancer risk, but few studies have examined body size earlier in life. We prospectively examined associations of body fatness at ages 5 and 10, BMI at age 18, height, and birthweight with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS: 110 311 women, 735 cases) and Nurses' Health Study II (NHSII: 113 059 women, 137 cases). Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). There was a weak inverse association between average body fatness at ages 5 and 10 and risk in the NHS (RR for heaviest vs most lean=0.81, 95% CI: 0.53-1.24, P for trend=0.04) and a nonsignificant positive association in the NHSII (RR=2.09, 95% CI: 0.98-4.48, P for trend=0.10), possibly due to differences in age and menopausal status. Height was positively associated with risk in both cohorts (RR for >or=1.75 vs <1.6 m=1.43, 95% CI: 1.05-1.96, P for trend=0.001). Body mass index at the age of 18 years and birthweight were not associated with risk. Further research should examine the biological mechanisms underlying the observed associations.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Figure drawing used to assess body fatness at ages 5 and 10 years.
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fig1: Figure drawing used to assess body fatness at ages 5 and 10 years.

Mentions: Participants recalled their body fatness (also called ‘somatotype') at ages 5 and 10 years using a nine-level figure drawing, where level 1 represents the most lean and level 9 represents the most overweight (Figure 1) (Stunkard et al, 1983). Among participants in the Third Harvard Growth Study, Pearsons correlations between recalled somatotype and measured BMI were 0.60 for the age of 5 years and 0.70 for the age of 10 years (Must et al, 1993). We averaged each participant's reported somatotypes at ages 5 and 10 years to obtain an estimate of childhood body fatness. The levels 5 and above were combined in the analysis because of small numbers of participants in these categories.


Body size in early life and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer: results from the Nurses' Health Studies.

Baer HJ, Hankinson SE, Tworoger SS - Br. J. Cancer (2008)

Figure drawing used to assess body fatness at ages 5 and 10 years.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2600685&req=5

fig1: Figure drawing used to assess body fatness at ages 5 and 10 years.
Mentions: Participants recalled their body fatness (also called ‘somatotype') at ages 5 and 10 years using a nine-level figure drawing, where level 1 represents the most lean and level 9 represents the most overweight (Figure 1) (Stunkard et al, 1983). Among participants in the Third Harvard Growth Study, Pearsons correlations between recalled somatotype and measured BMI were 0.60 for the age of 5 years and 0.70 for the age of 10 years (Must et al, 1993). We averaged each participant's reported somatotypes at ages 5 and 10 years to obtain an estimate of childhood body fatness. The levels 5 and above were combined in the analysis because of small numbers of participants in these categories.

Bottom Line: There was a weak inverse association between average body fatness at ages 5 and 10 and risk in the NHS (RR for heaviest vs most lean=0.81, 95% CI: 0.53-1.24, P for trend=0.04) and a nonsignificant positive association in the NHSII (RR=2.09, 95% CI: 0.98-4.48, P for trend=0.10), possibly due to differences in age and menopausal status.Height was positively associated with risk in both cohorts (RR for >or=1.75 vs <1.6 m=1.43, 95% CI: 1.05-1.96, P for trend=0.001).Further research should examine the biological mechanisms underlying the observed associations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. hbaer@partners.org

ABSTRACT
Adult body mass index (BMI) has been associated with ovarian cancer risk, but few studies have examined body size earlier in life. We prospectively examined associations of body fatness at ages 5 and 10, BMI at age 18, height, and birthweight with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS: 110 311 women, 735 cases) and Nurses' Health Study II (NHSII: 113 059 women, 137 cases). Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). There was a weak inverse association between average body fatness at ages 5 and 10 and risk in the NHS (RR for heaviest vs most lean=0.81, 95% CI: 0.53-1.24, P for trend=0.04) and a nonsignificant positive association in the NHSII (RR=2.09, 95% CI: 0.98-4.48, P for trend=0.10), possibly due to differences in age and menopausal status. Height was positively associated with risk in both cohorts (RR for >or=1.75 vs <1.6 m=1.43, 95% CI: 1.05-1.96, P for trend=0.001). Body mass index at the age of 18 years and birthweight were not associated with risk. Further research should examine the biological mechanisms underlying the observed associations.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus