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Increasing hospital admissions for pneumonia, England.

Trotter CL, Stuart JM, George R, Miller E - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: The increase was more marked in older adults, in whom the mortality rate was also highest.The proportion of patients with recorded coexisting conditions (defined by using the Charlson Comorbidity Index score) increased over the study period.It may be attributable to other population factors, changes in HES coding, changes to health service organization, other biologic phenomenon, or a combination of these effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. caroline.trotter@bristol.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
Pneumonia is an important cause of illness and death in England. To describe trends in pneumonia hospitalizations, we extracted information on all episodes of pneumonia that occurred from April 1997 through March 2005 recorded in the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) database by searching for International Classification of Diseases 10th revision codes J12-J18 in any diagnostic field. The age-standardized incidence of hospitalization with a primary diagnosis of pneumonia increased by 34% from 1.48 to 1.98 per 1,000 population between 1997-98 and 2004-05. The increase was more marked in older adults, in whom the mortality rate was also highest. The proportion of patients with recorded coexisting conditions (defined by using the Charlson Comorbidity Index score) increased over the study period. The rise in pneumonia hospital admissions was not fully explained by demographic change or increasing coexisting conditions. It may be attributable to other population factors, changes in HES coding, changes to health service organization, other biologic phenomenon, or a combination of these effects.

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Percentage of patients admitted to hospital with a primary diagnosis of pneumonia with coexisting conditions, as defined by using the Charlson Comorbidity Index, by age group.
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Figure 2: Percentage of patients admitted to hospital with a primary diagnosis of pneumonia with coexisting conditions, as defined by using the Charlson Comorbidity Index, by age group.

Mentions: The proportion of patients with a primary diagnosis of pneumonia and coexisting conditions (defined by Charlson Comorbidity Index score) varied over time and by age (Figure 2). In all age groups, the proportion of patients with coexisting conditions increased between 1997–98 and 2004–05. The median number of ICD10 diagnoses recorded increased from 2 in 1997–98 to 3 in 2004–05 in patients with a primary diagnosis of pneumonia, and from 3 to 4 in those with pneumonia in any diagnostic field. In each year, <1% of patients overall (range 0.5%–1%) had an additional alcohol-related code recorded. These codes were slightly more common (range 0.9%–1.9%) in those <65 years of age compared to those >65 years of age (range 0.3%–0.5%).


Increasing hospital admissions for pneumonia, England.

Trotter CL, Stuart JM, George R, Miller E - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Percentage of patients admitted to hospital with a primary diagnosis of pneumonia with coexisting conditions, as defined by using the Charlson Comorbidity Index, by age group.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2600241&req=5

Figure 2: Percentage of patients admitted to hospital with a primary diagnosis of pneumonia with coexisting conditions, as defined by using the Charlson Comorbidity Index, by age group.
Mentions: The proportion of patients with a primary diagnosis of pneumonia and coexisting conditions (defined by Charlson Comorbidity Index score) varied over time and by age (Figure 2). In all age groups, the proportion of patients with coexisting conditions increased between 1997–98 and 2004–05. The median number of ICD10 diagnoses recorded increased from 2 in 1997–98 to 3 in 2004–05 in patients with a primary diagnosis of pneumonia, and from 3 to 4 in those with pneumonia in any diagnostic field. In each year, <1% of patients overall (range 0.5%–1%) had an additional alcohol-related code recorded. These codes were slightly more common (range 0.9%–1.9%) in those <65 years of age compared to those >65 years of age (range 0.3%–0.5%).

Bottom Line: The increase was more marked in older adults, in whom the mortality rate was also highest.The proportion of patients with recorded coexisting conditions (defined by using the Charlson Comorbidity Index score) increased over the study period.It may be attributable to other population factors, changes in HES coding, changes to health service organization, other biologic phenomenon, or a combination of these effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. caroline.trotter@bristol.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
Pneumonia is an important cause of illness and death in England. To describe trends in pneumonia hospitalizations, we extracted information on all episodes of pneumonia that occurred from April 1997 through March 2005 recorded in the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) database by searching for International Classification of Diseases 10th revision codes J12-J18 in any diagnostic field. The age-standardized incidence of hospitalization with a primary diagnosis of pneumonia increased by 34% from 1.48 to 1.98 per 1,000 population between 1997-98 and 2004-05. The increase was more marked in older adults, in whom the mortality rate was also highest. The proportion of patients with recorded coexisting conditions (defined by using the Charlson Comorbidity Index score) increased over the study period. The rise in pneumonia hospital admissions was not fully explained by demographic change or increasing coexisting conditions. It may be attributable to other population factors, changes in HES coding, changes to health service organization, other biologic phenomenon, or a combination of these effects.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus