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Naturally acquired human Plasmodium knowlesi infection, Singapore.

Ng OT, Ooi EE, Lee CC, Lee PJ, Ng LC, Pei SW, Tu TM, Loh JP, Leo YS - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: We report a case of naturally acquired Plasmodium knowlesi in Singapore, a malaria-free country.Diagnosis was confirmed by PCR with validated species-specific primers.P. knowlesi infection is a differential diagnosis of febrile illness acquired in Singapore.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Infectious Disease, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng, Singapore 308433. oon_tek_ng@ttsh.com.sg

ABSTRACT
We report a case of naturally acquired Plasmodium knowlesi in Singapore, a malaria-free country. Diagnosis was confirmed by PCR with validated species-specific primers. In industrialized countries, free-ranging primates are a potential source of P. knowlesi human infection. P. knowlesi infection is a differential diagnosis of febrile illness acquired in Singapore.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Phylogenetic trees comparing our case sample (denoted as SingPk1) with other Plasmodium species, based on SSU rRNA (A) and csp (B) sequences. Species and sequences used were selected to match those previously reported (5). Figures on the branches are bootstrap percentages based on 1,000 replicates, and only those above 80% are shown. GenBank accession numbers are in parentheses.
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Figure 2: Phylogenetic trees comparing our case sample (denoted as SingPk1) with other Plasmodium species, based on SSU rRNA (A) and csp (B) sequences. Species and sequences used were selected to match those previously reported (5). Figures on the branches are bootstrap percentages based on 1,000 replicates, and only those above 80% are shown. GenBank accession numbers are in parentheses.

Mentions: We confirmed the pathogen by using previously described approaches to compare the sequences of the 5′ and 3′ ends of the circumsporozoite protein (csp) gene (13), as well as the gene encoding of the sSSU rRNA (5) in our case sample, to other Plasmodium parasites. Sequences were obtained by direct sequencing of PCR products and aligned by using the ClustalW method (EMBL-EBI, Hixton, Cambridge, UK); we constructed phylogenetic trees by using the MegAlign software (DNASTAR Inc, Madison, WI, USA). The case sample (denoted as SingPk1) clustered with other P. knowlesi isolates and is clearly distinct from other Plasmodium species (Figure 2).


Naturally acquired human Plasmodium knowlesi infection, Singapore.

Ng OT, Ooi EE, Lee CC, Lee PJ, Ng LC, Pei SW, Tu TM, Loh JP, Leo YS - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Phylogenetic trees comparing our case sample (denoted as SingPk1) with other Plasmodium species, based on SSU rRNA (A) and csp (B) sequences. Species and sequences used were selected to match those previously reported (5). Figures on the branches are bootstrap percentages based on 1,000 replicates, and only those above 80% are shown. GenBank accession numbers are in parentheses.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2600232&req=5

Figure 2: Phylogenetic trees comparing our case sample (denoted as SingPk1) with other Plasmodium species, based on SSU rRNA (A) and csp (B) sequences. Species and sequences used were selected to match those previously reported (5). Figures on the branches are bootstrap percentages based on 1,000 replicates, and only those above 80% are shown. GenBank accession numbers are in parentheses.
Mentions: We confirmed the pathogen by using previously described approaches to compare the sequences of the 5′ and 3′ ends of the circumsporozoite protein (csp) gene (13), as well as the gene encoding of the sSSU rRNA (5) in our case sample, to other Plasmodium parasites. Sequences were obtained by direct sequencing of PCR products and aligned by using the ClustalW method (EMBL-EBI, Hixton, Cambridge, UK); we constructed phylogenetic trees by using the MegAlign software (DNASTAR Inc, Madison, WI, USA). The case sample (denoted as SingPk1) clustered with other P. knowlesi isolates and is clearly distinct from other Plasmodium species (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: We report a case of naturally acquired Plasmodium knowlesi in Singapore, a malaria-free country.Diagnosis was confirmed by PCR with validated species-specific primers.P. knowlesi infection is a differential diagnosis of febrile illness acquired in Singapore.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Infectious Disease, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng, Singapore 308433. oon_tek_ng@ttsh.com.sg

ABSTRACT
We report a case of naturally acquired Plasmodium knowlesi in Singapore, a malaria-free country. Diagnosis was confirmed by PCR with validated species-specific primers. In industrialized countries, free-ranging primates are a potential source of P. knowlesi human infection. P. knowlesi infection is a differential diagnosis of febrile illness acquired in Singapore.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus