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Naturally acquired human Plasmodium knowlesi infection, Singapore.

Ng OT, Ooi EE, Lee CC, Lee PJ, Ng LC, Pei SW, Tu TM, Loh JP, Leo YS - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: We report a case of naturally acquired Plasmodium knowlesi in Singapore, a malaria-free country.Diagnosis was confirmed by PCR with validated species-specific primers.P. knowlesi infection is a differential diagnosis of febrile illness acquired in Singapore.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Infectious Disease, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng, Singapore 308433. oon_tek_ng@ttsh.com.sg

ABSTRACT
We report a case of naturally acquired Plasmodium knowlesi in Singapore, a malaria-free country. Diagnosis was confirmed by PCR with validated species-specific primers. In industrialized countries, free-ranging primates are a potential source of P. knowlesi human infection. P. knowlesi infection is a differential diagnosis of febrile illness acquired in Singapore.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Patient’s temperature chart showing fever spikes 24 h apart at approximately 7 PM daily (red arrow). The black arrow denotes 38°C, and each blue arrow denotes a difference of 1°C from the neighboring arrow.
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Figure 1: Patient’s temperature chart showing fever spikes 24 h apart at approximately 7 PM daily (red arrow). The black arrow denotes 38°C, and each blue arrow denotes a difference of 1°C from the neighboring arrow.

Mentions: Initial diagnosis was dengue fever, which is endemic in Singapore. The patient experienced daily fever spikes from 39.5°C to 40.4°C (Figure 1). When fever persisted (40.4°C on day 6 of his illness, hospital day 3), the clinical picture was atypical for dengue fever. Blood films for malaria parasites were ordered, because introduced cases of malaria have been reported in Singapore (10). Microscopy showed Plasmodium parasitemia of 0.2% (equivalent to 7,700 parasites/mmol/L blood) with morphologic features consistent with P. malariae. Results of dengue reverse transcription–PCR (RT-PCR) on serum, 2 sets of blood cultures, and Rickettsia typhi serologic testing were negative. Results of a chest radiograph and ultrasound of the abdomen were normal.


Naturally acquired human Plasmodium knowlesi infection, Singapore.

Ng OT, Ooi EE, Lee CC, Lee PJ, Ng LC, Pei SW, Tu TM, Loh JP, Leo YS - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Patient’s temperature chart showing fever spikes 24 h apart at approximately 7 PM daily (red arrow). The black arrow denotes 38°C, and each blue arrow denotes a difference of 1°C from the neighboring arrow.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2600232&req=5

Figure 1: Patient’s temperature chart showing fever spikes 24 h apart at approximately 7 PM daily (red arrow). The black arrow denotes 38°C, and each blue arrow denotes a difference of 1°C from the neighboring arrow.
Mentions: Initial diagnosis was dengue fever, which is endemic in Singapore. The patient experienced daily fever spikes from 39.5°C to 40.4°C (Figure 1). When fever persisted (40.4°C on day 6 of his illness, hospital day 3), the clinical picture was atypical for dengue fever. Blood films for malaria parasites were ordered, because introduced cases of malaria have been reported in Singapore (10). Microscopy showed Plasmodium parasitemia of 0.2% (equivalent to 7,700 parasites/mmol/L blood) with morphologic features consistent with P. malariae. Results of dengue reverse transcription–PCR (RT-PCR) on serum, 2 sets of blood cultures, and Rickettsia typhi serologic testing were negative. Results of a chest radiograph and ultrasound of the abdomen were normal.

Bottom Line: We report a case of naturally acquired Plasmodium knowlesi in Singapore, a malaria-free country.Diagnosis was confirmed by PCR with validated species-specific primers.P. knowlesi infection is a differential diagnosis of febrile illness acquired in Singapore.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Infectious Disease, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, 11 Jalan Tan Tock Seng, Singapore 308433. oon_tek_ng@ttsh.com.sg

ABSTRACT
We report a case of naturally acquired Plasmodium knowlesi in Singapore, a malaria-free country. Diagnosis was confirmed by PCR with validated species-specific primers. In industrialized countries, free-ranging primates are a potential source of P. knowlesi human infection. P. knowlesi infection is a differential diagnosis of febrile illness acquired in Singapore.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus