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Emergence of polycystic neotropical echinococcosis.

Tappe D, Stich A, Frosch M - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: A second South American species, E. vogeli, was described in 1972.Obtaining recognition of the 2 species and establishing their connection to human disease were complicated because the life cycle of tapeworms is complex and comprises different developmental stages in diverse host species.To date, at least 106 human cases have been reported from 12 South and Central American countries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany. dtappe@hygiene.uni-wuerzburg.de

ABSTRACT
Echinococcosis is a parasitic zoonosis of increasing concern. In 1903, the first cases of human polycystic echinococcosis, a disease resembling alveolar echinococcosis, emerged in Argentina. One of the parasites responsible, Echinococcus oligarthrus, had been discovered in its adult strobilar stage before 1850. However, >100 years passed from the first description of the adult parasite to the recognition that this species is responsible for some cases of human neotropical polycystic echinococcosis and the elucidation of the parasite's life cycle. A second South American species, E. vogeli, was described in 1972. Obtaining recognition of the 2 species and establishing their connection to human disease were complicated because the life cycle of tapeworms is complex and comprises different developmental stages in diverse host species. To date, at least 106 human cases have been reported from 12 South and Central American countries.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The agouti, Dasyprocta sp., one of the natural intermediate hosts for Echinoccocus oligarthrus. Drawing by Gustav Mützel (1839–1893).
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Figure 3: The agouti, Dasyprocta sp., one of the natural intermediate hosts for Echinoccocus oligarthrus. Drawing by Gustav Mützel (1839–1893).

Mentions: On May 22, 1914, Emile Brumpt (1877–1951) and Charles Joyeux (1881–1966) from the Laboratoire de Parasitologie in Paris autopsied 4 agoutis (Dasyprocta agouti, no. D. leporina, Figure 3) in the state of São Paulo, Brazil (17). In the spleen and liver of one of these South American rodents they found multiple cysts. The liquid of the cysts resembled hydatid sand. The authors stated that the cuticle of the larva was very thin and that this “reminded us that in Echinococcus granulosus this cuticle may reach several millimeters.” The inner surface of the cysts contained a proliferative membrane with many vesicles and protoscolices, the larval stage of tapeworms. The authors extensively described the protoscolices and the amount and shape of the rostellar hooklets they found. They concluded that the cysts in the agouti resembled the general structure of E. granulosus cysts. After comparing the hooks with those from E. granulosus and E. multilocularis, Brumpt and Joyeux concluded that the larva found in the agouti must have originated from a very small tapeworm. They stated that it was “unfortunately impossible to assign our hydatid to a known adult form.” The authors continued to speculate that “due to the origin of the material, it seems absolutely indicated to think of Taenia oligarthra.” However, they concluded that the hooklets previously described by Lühe were different in size and shape and that therefore the cysts in the agouti belonged to a not yet described adult tapeworm, which they tentatively named Echinococcus cruzi. Their observations were published 10 years later, in 1924 (17).


Emergence of polycystic neotropical echinococcosis.

Tappe D, Stich A, Frosch M - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

The agouti, Dasyprocta sp., one of the natural intermediate hosts for Echinoccocus oligarthrus. Drawing by Gustav Mützel (1839–1893).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2600197&req=5

Figure 3: The agouti, Dasyprocta sp., one of the natural intermediate hosts for Echinoccocus oligarthrus. Drawing by Gustav Mützel (1839–1893).
Mentions: On May 22, 1914, Emile Brumpt (1877–1951) and Charles Joyeux (1881–1966) from the Laboratoire de Parasitologie in Paris autopsied 4 agoutis (Dasyprocta agouti, no. D. leporina, Figure 3) in the state of São Paulo, Brazil (17). In the spleen and liver of one of these South American rodents they found multiple cysts. The liquid of the cysts resembled hydatid sand. The authors stated that the cuticle of the larva was very thin and that this “reminded us that in Echinococcus granulosus this cuticle may reach several millimeters.” The inner surface of the cysts contained a proliferative membrane with many vesicles and protoscolices, the larval stage of tapeworms. The authors extensively described the protoscolices and the amount and shape of the rostellar hooklets they found. They concluded that the cysts in the agouti resembled the general structure of E. granulosus cysts. After comparing the hooks with those from E. granulosus and E. multilocularis, Brumpt and Joyeux concluded that the larva found in the agouti must have originated from a very small tapeworm. They stated that it was “unfortunately impossible to assign our hydatid to a known adult form.” The authors continued to speculate that “due to the origin of the material, it seems absolutely indicated to think of Taenia oligarthra.” However, they concluded that the hooklets previously described by Lühe were different in size and shape and that therefore the cysts in the agouti belonged to a not yet described adult tapeworm, which they tentatively named Echinococcus cruzi. Their observations were published 10 years later, in 1924 (17).

Bottom Line: A second South American species, E. vogeli, was described in 1972.Obtaining recognition of the 2 species and establishing their connection to human disease were complicated because the life cycle of tapeworms is complex and comprises different developmental stages in diverse host species.To date, at least 106 human cases have been reported from 12 South and Central American countries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany. dtappe@hygiene.uni-wuerzburg.de

ABSTRACT
Echinococcosis is a parasitic zoonosis of increasing concern. In 1903, the first cases of human polycystic echinococcosis, a disease resembling alveolar echinococcosis, emerged in Argentina. One of the parasites responsible, Echinococcus oligarthrus, had been discovered in its adult strobilar stage before 1850. However, >100 years passed from the first description of the adult parasite to the recognition that this species is responsible for some cases of human neotropical polycystic echinococcosis and the elucidation of the parasite's life cycle. A second South American species, E. vogeli, was described in 1972. Obtaining recognition of the 2 species and establishing their connection to human disease were complicated because the life cycle of tapeworms is complex and comprises different developmental stages in diverse host species. To date, at least 106 human cases have been reported from 12 South and Central American countries.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus