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Emergence of polycystic neotropical echinococcosis.

Tappe D, Stich A, Frosch M - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: A second South American species, E. vogeli, was described in 1972.Obtaining recognition of the 2 species and establishing their connection to human disease were complicated because the life cycle of tapeworms is complex and comprises different developmental stages in diverse host species.To date, at least 106 human cases have been reported from 12 South and Central American countries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany. dtappe@hygiene.uni-wuerzburg.de

ABSTRACT
Echinococcosis is a parasitic zoonosis of increasing concern. In 1903, the first cases of human polycystic echinococcosis, a disease resembling alveolar echinococcosis, emerged in Argentina. One of the parasites responsible, Echinococcus oligarthrus, had been discovered in its adult strobilar stage before 1850. However, >100 years passed from the first description of the adult parasite to the recognition that this species is responsible for some cases of human neotropical polycystic echinococcosis and the elucidation of the parasite's life cycle. A second South American species, E. vogeli, was described in 1972. Obtaining recognition of the 2 species and establishing their connection to human disease were complicated because the life cycle of tapeworms is complex and comprises different developmental stages in diverse host species. To date, at least 106 human cases have been reported from 12 South and Central American countries.

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First drawing of the rostellar hooklets (left) and the entire strobilar stage of Echinococcus oligarthrus (right). The specimen was listed under no. 396 in the Wiener Hofmuseum. From (15).
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Figure 2: First drawing of the rostellar hooklets (left) and the entire strobilar stage of Echinococcus oligarthrus (right). The specimen was listed under no. 396 in the Wiener Hofmuseum. From (15).

Mentions: In 1910, Max Lühe (1870–1916), a German physician and zoologist from Königsberg, requested the cestode material from Vienna and extensively characterized the small helminth. Lühe noted that most of the specimens had lost their rostellar hooks but that they were still present in some organisms (Figure 2). He believed that Diesing must have overlooked the few specimens with hooks. Besides the remarkable difference in body length, no discrepancy with T. echinococcus was found. Lühe therefore concluded that T. oligarthra and T. echinococcus were closely related (15). Sixteen years later, Thomas Wright Moir Cameron (1894–1980), from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, rediscovered the adult tapeworm in a different South American felid, a jaguarundi (Felis yaguarondi), which had died at the London Zoo. Cameron proposed placing T. oligarthra in the genus Echinococcus (16), which had been established by Karl Asmund Rudolphi in 1801. At that time, a cystic larval stage of the parasite had not been found or assigned to a strobilar stage. Whether this parasite could cause human disease was still unknown because no connection to the early Argentinian cases had been established.


Emergence of polycystic neotropical echinococcosis.

Tappe D, Stich A, Frosch M - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

First drawing of the rostellar hooklets (left) and the entire strobilar stage of Echinococcus oligarthrus (right). The specimen was listed under no. 396 in the Wiener Hofmuseum. From (15).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2600197&req=5

Figure 2: First drawing of the rostellar hooklets (left) and the entire strobilar stage of Echinococcus oligarthrus (right). The specimen was listed under no. 396 in the Wiener Hofmuseum. From (15).
Mentions: In 1910, Max Lühe (1870–1916), a German physician and zoologist from Königsberg, requested the cestode material from Vienna and extensively characterized the small helminth. Lühe noted that most of the specimens had lost their rostellar hooks but that they were still present in some organisms (Figure 2). He believed that Diesing must have overlooked the few specimens with hooks. Besides the remarkable difference in body length, no discrepancy with T. echinococcus was found. Lühe therefore concluded that T. oligarthra and T. echinococcus were closely related (15). Sixteen years later, Thomas Wright Moir Cameron (1894–1980), from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, rediscovered the adult tapeworm in a different South American felid, a jaguarundi (Felis yaguarondi), which had died at the London Zoo. Cameron proposed placing T. oligarthra in the genus Echinococcus (16), which had been established by Karl Asmund Rudolphi in 1801. At that time, a cystic larval stage of the parasite had not been found or assigned to a strobilar stage. Whether this parasite could cause human disease was still unknown because no connection to the early Argentinian cases had been established.

Bottom Line: A second South American species, E. vogeli, was described in 1972.Obtaining recognition of the 2 species and establishing their connection to human disease were complicated because the life cycle of tapeworms is complex and comprises different developmental stages in diverse host species.To date, at least 106 human cases have been reported from 12 South and Central American countries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany. dtappe@hygiene.uni-wuerzburg.de

ABSTRACT
Echinococcosis is a parasitic zoonosis of increasing concern. In 1903, the first cases of human polycystic echinococcosis, a disease resembling alveolar echinococcosis, emerged in Argentina. One of the parasites responsible, Echinococcus oligarthrus, had been discovered in its adult strobilar stage before 1850. However, >100 years passed from the first description of the adult parasite to the recognition that this species is responsible for some cases of human neotropical polycystic echinococcosis and the elucidation of the parasite's life cycle. A second South American species, E. vogeli, was described in 1972. Obtaining recognition of the 2 species and establishing their connection to human disease were complicated because the life cycle of tapeworms is complex and comprises different developmental stages in diverse host species. To date, at least 106 human cases have been reported from 12 South and Central American countries.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus