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Emergence of polycystic neotropical echinococcosis.

Tappe D, Stich A, Frosch M - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: A second South American species, E. vogeli, was described in 1972.Obtaining recognition of the 2 species and establishing their connection to human disease were complicated because the life cycle of tapeworms is complex and comprises different developmental stages in diverse host species.To date, at least 106 human cases have been reported from 12 South and Central American countries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany. dtappe@hygiene.uni-wuerzburg.de

ABSTRACT
Echinococcosis is a parasitic zoonosis of increasing concern. In 1903, the first cases of human polycystic echinococcosis, a disease resembling alveolar echinococcosis, emerged in Argentina. One of the parasites responsible, Echinococcus oligarthrus, had been discovered in its adult strobilar stage before 1850. However, >100 years passed from the first description of the adult parasite to the recognition that this species is responsible for some cases of human neotropical polycystic echinococcosis and the elucidation of the parasite's life cycle. A second South American species, E. vogeli, was described in 1972. Obtaining recognition of the 2 species and establishing their connection to human disease were complicated because the life cycle of tapeworms is complex and comprises different developmental stages in diverse host species. To date, at least 106 human cases have been reported from 12 South and Central American countries.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Latin description of adult Echinococcus oligarthrus by Karl Moritz Diesing, 1863 ( 14, p. 370). In addition to the morphologic characterization of the helminth, the 2 prior references from Diesing’s Systema Helminthum (12) and from Leuckart’s monography (13) are listed. Natterer, who collected the helminth in Brazil, is also mentioned.
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Figure 1: Latin description of adult Echinococcus oligarthrus by Karl Moritz Diesing, 1863 ( 14, p. 370). In addition to the morphologic characterization of the helminth, the 2 prior references from Diesing’s Systema Helminthum (12) and from Leuckart’s monography (13) are listed. Natterer, who collected the helminth in Brazil, is also mentioned.

Mentions: Karl Moritz Diesing (1800–1867), a zoologist and successor to Bremser in Vienna, listed the helminth collected by Natterer in his famous Systema Helminthum of 1850 initially under the juvenile form of Taenia crassicollis (“Taeniolae in fele concolore lectae probabiliter pullae”) found in F. concolor (12). Rudolf Leuckart (1822–1898) stated in a monograph (13) that these helminths may not be seen as juveniles of T. crassicollis because they share some characteristics with T. echinococcus. Diesing later reclassified Natterer’s specimen as Taenia oligarthra in his Revision der Cephalocotyleen, which was presented to the scientific academy in Vienna on November 5, 1863 (14). In his Latin description, Diesing noted the presence of only 3–4 proglottids (articuli), hence the name “oligarthrus” (Figure 1). Diesing stated that the low number of proglottids is similar to the number of proglottids in T. echinococcus. The organism was still not recognized as an echinococcus, however. The presence of hooks typical for echinococci was not mentioned, and the parasite was placed in a subgroup with hookless tapeworms. All of these scientific descriptions of the South American tapeworm were forgotten by 1903, when Viñas described the cases of possible AE in Argentina.


Emergence of polycystic neotropical echinococcosis.

Tappe D, Stich A, Frosch M - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Latin description of adult Echinococcus oligarthrus by Karl Moritz Diesing, 1863 ( 14, p. 370). In addition to the morphologic characterization of the helminth, the 2 prior references from Diesing’s Systema Helminthum (12) and from Leuckart’s monography (13) are listed. Natterer, who collected the helminth in Brazil, is also mentioned.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2600197&req=5

Figure 1: Latin description of adult Echinococcus oligarthrus by Karl Moritz Diesing, 1863 ( 14, p. 370). In addition to the morphologic characterization of the helminth, the 2 prior references from Diesing’s Systema Helminthum (12) and from Leuckart’s monography (13) are listed. Natterer, who collected the helminth in Brazil, is also mentioned.
Mentions: Karl Moritz Diesing (1800–1867), a zoologist and successor to Bremser in Vienna, listed the helminth collected by Natterer in his famous Systema Helminthum of 1850 initially under the juvenile form of Taenia crassicollis (“Taeniolae in fele concolore lectae probabiliter pullae”) found in F. concolor (12). Rudolf Leuckart (1822–1898) stated in a monograph (13) that these helminths may not be seen as juveniles of T. crassicollis because they share some characteristics with T. echinococcus. Diesing later reclassified Natterer’s specimen as Taenia oligarthra in his Revision der Cephalocotyleen, which was presented to the scientific academy in Vienna on November 5, 1863 (14). In his Latin description, Diesing noted the presence of only 3–4 proglottids (articuli), hence the name “oligarthrus” (Figure 1). Diesing stated that the low number of proglottids is similar to the number of proglottids in T. echinococcus. The organism was still not recognized as an echinococcus, however. The presence of hooks typical for echinococci was not mentioned, and the parasite was placed in a subgroup with hookless tapeworms. All of these scientific descriptions of the South American tapeworm were forgotten by 1903, when Viñas described the cases of possible AE in Argentina.

Bottom Line: A second South American species, E. vogeli, was described in 1972.Obtaining recognition of the 2 species and establishing their connection to human disease were complicated because the life cycle of tapeworms is complex and comprises different developmental stages in diverse host species.To date, at least 106 human cases have been reported from 12 South and Central American countries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany. dtappe@hygiene.uni-wuerzburg.de

ABSTRACT
Echinococcosis is a parasitic zoonosis of increasing concern. In 1903, the first cases of human polycystic echinococcosis, a disease resembling alveolar echinococcosis, emerged in Argentina. One of the parasites responsible, Echinococcus oligarthrus, had been discovered in its adult strobilar stage before 1850. However, >100 years passed from the first description of the adult parasite to the recognition that this species is responsible for some cases of human neotropical polycystic echinococcosis and the elucidation of the parasite's life cycle. A second South American species, E. vogeli, was described in 1972. Obtaining recognition of the 2 species and establishing their connection to human disease were complicated because the life cycle of tapeworms is complex and comprises different developmental stages in diverse host species. To date, at least 106 human cases have been reported from 12 South and Central American countries.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus