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Prolonged Plasmodium falciparum infection in immigrants, Paris.

D'Ortenzio E, Godineau N, Fontanet A, Houze S, Bouchaud O, Matheron S, Le Bras J - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: Few immigrant travelers have Plasmodium falciparum infections >2 months after leaving malaria-endemic areas.We conducted a case-control study to identify factors associated with prolonged P. falciparum infection in immigrant travelers.Results suggest that P. falciparum infection should be systematically suspected, even months after travel, especially in pregnant women and first-arrival immigrants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Bichat-Claude Bernard, Paris, France. ericdortenzio@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
Few immigrant travelers have Plasmodium falciparum infections >2 months after leaving malaria-endemic areas. We conducted a case-control study to identify factors associated with prolonged P. falciparum infection in immigrant travelers. Results suggest that P. falciparum infection should be systematically suspected, even months after travel, especially in pregnant women and first-arrival immigrants.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Delay in days or years between arrival in France and diagnosis of imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria, Bichat-Claude Bernard Hospital and Saint Denis Hospital, Paris, France, 1996–2005.
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Figure 1: Delay in days or years between arrival in France and diagnosis of imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria, Bichat-Claude Bernard Hospital and Saint Denis Hospital, Paris, France, 1996–2005.

Mentions: During the 10-year period, 61 (2.3%) late infections occurred among 2,680 diagnosed P. falciparum malaria infections. The median diagnosis delay was 5 months (interquartile range 3–9 months). These infections included 10 patients (5 pregnant women, 2 HIV-positive patients, and 3 first-arrival immigrants) with clinical malaria >1 year after their arrival. Four of them, all pregnant women, had clinical malaria >3 years after their arrival. For the case–control study, 197 controls were compared with 61 case-patients (Figure). Table 1 shows the main characteristics of case-patients and controls. Case-patients were younger (median age 30.6 years vs. 34.5 years, p = 0.04) and more often female (54.1% vs. 38.1%, p = 0.03) than controls. The mean parasitemia level was lower for case-patients than for controls (0.6% vs. 1.4%, p = 0.04), including patients with 8 asymptomatic cases versus none of the controls (in these cases, diagnosis of malaria was made through systematic checking).


Prolonged Plasmodium falciparum infection in immigrants, Paris.

D'Ortenzio E, Godineau N, Fontanet A, Houze S, Bouchaud O, Matheron S, Le Bras J - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Delay in days or years between arrival in France and diagnosis of imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria, Bichat-Claude Bernard Hospital and Saint Denis Hospital, Paris, France, 1996–2005.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2600192&req=5

Figure 1: Delay in days or years between arrival in France and diagnosis of imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria, Bichat-Claude Bernard Hospital and Saint Denis Hospital, Paris, France, 1996–2005.
Mentions: During the 10-year period, 61 (2.3%) late infections occurred among 2,680 diagnosed P. falciparum malaria infections. The median diagnosis delay was 5 months (interquartile range 3–9 months). These infections included 10 patients (5 pregnant women, 2 HIV-positive patients, and 3 first-arrival immigrants) with clinical malaria >1 year after their arrival. Four of them, all pregnant women, had clinical malaria >3 years after their arrival. For the case–control study, 197 controls were compared with 61 case-patients (Figure). Table 1 shows the main characteristics of case-patients and controls. Case-patients were younger (median age 30.6 years vs. 34.5 years, p = 0.04) and more often female (54.1% vs. 38.1%, p = 0.03) than controls. The mean parasitemia level was lower for case-patients than for controls (0.6% vs. 1.4%, p = 0.04), including patients with 8 asymptomatic cases versus none of the controls (in these cases, diagnosis of malaria was made through systematic checking).

Bottom Line: Few immigrant travelers have Plasmodium falciparum infections >2 months after leaving malaria-endemic areas.We conducted a case-control study to identify factors associated with prolonged P. falciparum infection in immigrant travelers.Results suggest that P. falciparum infection should be systematically suspected, even months after travel, especially in pregnant women and first-arrival immigrants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Bichat-Claude Bernard, Paris, France. ericdortenzio@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
Few immigrant travelers have Plasmodium falciparum infections >2 months after leaving malaria-endemic areas. We conducted a case-control study to identify factors associated with prolonged P. falciparum infection in immigrant travelers. Results suggest that P. falciparum infection should be systematically suspected, even months after travel, especially in pregnant women and first-arrival immigrants.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus