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Human bocavirus infections in hospitalized children and adults.

Longtin J, Bastien M, Gilca R, Leblanc E, de Serres G, Bergeron MG, Boivin G - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: Another virus was detected in 22 (71%) of the 31 HBoV-positive NPAs from symptomatic children.Two clades of HBoV were identified.The pathogenic role of HBoV in RTIs is uncertain because it was frequently detected in symptomatic and asymptomatic children and was commonly found with other viruses in symptomatic children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Studies have reported human bocavirus (HBoV) in children with respiratory tract infections (RTIs), but only occasionally in adults. We searched for HBoV DNA in nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) from adults with exacerbations of chronic bronchitis or pneumonia, from children hospitalized for acute RTIs, and from asymptomatic children during the winter of 2002-2003 in Canada. HBoV was detected in NPAs of 1 (0.8%) of 126 symptomatic adults, 31 (13.8%) of 225 symptomatic children, and 43 (43%) of 100 asymptomatic children undergoing elective surgery. Another virus was detected in 22 (71%) of the 31 HBoV-positive NPAs from symptomatic children. Two clades of HBoV were identified. The pathogenic role of HBoV in RTIs is uncertain because it was frequently detected in symptomatic and asymptomatic children and was commonly found with other viruses in symptomatic children.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Phylogenetic tree of human pediatric bocavirus strains from Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. Patient numbers beginning with the letter t indicate asymptomatic (control) children. Strains from Sweden (sequence type [ST] 1, GenBank accession no. DQ000495, and ST2, GenBank accession no. DQ000496) are included (1). Numbers along branches are bootstrap values from 1,000 replicates. Scale bar shows 1 substitution for every 1,000 nucleic acid residues.
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Figure 1: Phylogenetic tree of human pediatric bocavirus strains from Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. Patient numbers beginning with the letter t indicate asymptomatic (control) children. Strains from Sweden (sequence type [ST] 1, GenBank accession no. DQ000495, and ST2, GenBank accession no. DQ000496) are included (1). Numbers along branches are bootstrap values from 1,000 replicates. Scale bar shows 1 substitution for every 1,000 nucleic acid residues.

Mentions: Sequence analysis of the HBoV VP1/VP2 genes performed on ≈50% of HBoV-positive specimens showed 2 distinct clades of viruses (Figure). These genotypes clustered with the original strains described by Allander et al. (ST1, GenBank accession no. DQ000495, and ST2, GenBank accession no. DQ000496) (1). There was no temporal link between the clades because both were equally distributed throughout the study period. No obvious relationship was found between clades and the presence or absence of symptoms.


Human bocavirus infections in hospitalized children and adults.

Longtin J, Bastien M, Gilca R, Leblanc E, de Serres G, Bergeron MG, Boivin G - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Phylogenetic tree of human pediatric bocavirus strains from Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. Patient numbers beginning with the letter t indicate asymptomatic (control) children. Strains from Sweden (sequence type [ST] 1, GenBank accession no. DQ000495, and ST2, GenBank accession no. DQ000496) are included (1). Numbers along branches are bootstrap values from 1,000 replicates. Scale bar shows 1 substitution for every 1,000 nucleic acid residues.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2600186&req=5

Figure 1: Phylogenetic tree of human pediatric bocavirus strains from Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. Patient numbers beginning with the letter t indicate asymptomatic (control) children. Strains from Sweden (sequence type [ST] 1, GenBank accession no. DQ000495, and ST2, GenBank accession no. DQ000496) are included (1). Numbers along branches are bootstrap values from 1,000 replicates. Scale bar shows 1 substitution for every 1,000 nucleic acid residues.
Mentions: Sequence analysis of the HBoV VP1/VP2 genes performed on ≈50% of HBoV-positive specimens showed 2 distinct clades of viruses (Figure). These genotypes clustered with the original strains described by Allander et al. (ST1, GenBank accession no. DQ000495, and ST2, GenBank accession no. DQ000496) (1). There was no temporal link between the clades because both were equally distributed throughout the study period. No obvious relationship was found between clades and the presence or absence of symptoms.

Bottom Line: Another virus was detected in 22 (71%) of the 31 HBoV-positive NPAs from symptomatic children.Two clades of HBoV were identified.The pathogenic role of HBoV in RTIs is uncertain because it was frequently detected in symptomatic and asymptomatic children and was commonly found with other viruses in symptomatic children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Studies have reported human bocavirus (HBoV) in children with respiratory tract infections (RTIs), but only occasionally in adults. We searched for HBoV DNA in nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) from adults with exacerbations of chronic bronchitis or pneumonia, from children hospitalized for acute RTIs, and from asymptomatic children during the winter of 2002-2003 in Canada. HBoV was detected in NPAs of 1 (0.8%) of 126 symptomatic adults, 31 (13.8%) of 225 symptomatic children, and 43 (43%) of 100 asymptomatic children undergoing elective surgery. Another virus was detected in 22 (71%) of the 31 HBoV-positive NPAs from symptomatic children. Two clades of HBoV were identified. The pathogenic role of HBoV in RTIs is uncertain because it was frequently detected in symptomatic and asymptomatic children and was commonly found with other viruses in symptomatic children.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus