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Magpies as hosts for West Nile virus, southern France.

Jourdain E, Gauthier-Clerc M, Sabatier P, Grège O, Greenland T, Leblond A, Lafaye M, Zeller HG - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Bottom Line: European magpies (Pica pica) from southern France were tested for antibodies to West Nile virus (WNV) and viral shedding in feces during spring-autumn 2005.Results suggest that this peridomestic species may be a suitable sentinel species and a relevant target for additional investigations on WNV ecology in Europe.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre de Recherche de la Tour du Valat, Arles, France. elsa.jourdain@hik.se

ABSTRACT
European magpies (Pica pica) from southern France were tested for antibodies to West Nile virus (WNV) and viral shedding in feces during spring-autumn 2005. Results suggest that this peridomestic species may be a suitable sentinel species and a relevant target for additional investigations on WNV ecology in Europe.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Area of Camargue, France, showing locations of magpie capture sites: site A (n = 56, with 24 adults, 32 juveniles, and 0 nestlings), site B (n = 94, with 34 adults, 57 juveniles, and 3 nestlings), site C (n = 68, with 17 adults, 34 juveniles, and 17 nestlings), and site D (n = 53, with 1 adult, 52 juveniles, and 0 nestlings). Confirmed equine and avian cases infected with West Nile virus in 2004 are also indicated. Histograms correspond to site designations and indicate serologic titers (x-axes) measured by using a microneutralization test plotted against no. birds (y-axes).
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Figure 1: Area of Camargue, France, showing locations of magpie capture sites: site A (n = 56, with 24 adults, 32 juveniles, and 0 nestlings), site B (n = 94, with 34 adults, 57 juveniles, and 3 nestlings), site C (n = 68, with 17 adults, 34 juveniles, and 17 nestlings), and site D (n = 53, with 1 adult, 52 juveniles, and 0 nestlings). Confirmed equine and avian cases infected with West Nile virus in 2004 are also indicated. Histograms correspond to site designations and indicate serologic titers (x-axes) measured by using a microneutralization test plotted against no. birds (y-axes).

Mentions: The study was conducted from late spring to early autumn 2005. Multicatch magpie traps, i.e., circular traps that catch <4 birds simultaneously, were set 1 day per week from July to September in different places within 3 areas (Figure, top panel). Area A contained dry and wet habitats in which some WNV equine cases were reported in 2004. Area B was a wetland in which most clinical equine cases occurred in 2004, and a WNV-positive magpie was detected in October 2004. Area C was a wetland in which a WNV-positive house sparrow (Passer domesticus) was detected in October 2004 (5). Additionally, some magpies were obtained in July and August 2005 from a crow ladder trap permanently set in area D, a dry area in which some horses had WNV infection in 2004. A few magpie nestlings were also sampled from their nest in May, June, and July 2005.


Magpies as hosts for West Nile virus, southern France.

Jourdain E, Gauthier-Clerc M, Sabatier P, Grège O, Greenland T, Leblond A, Lafaye M, Zeller HG - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Area of Camargue, France, showing locations of magpie capture sites: site A (n = 56, with 24 adults, 32 juveniles, and 0 nestlings), site B (n = 94, with 34 adults, 57 juveniles, and 3 nestlings), site C (n = 68, with 17 adults, 34 juveniles, and 17 nestlings), and site D (n = 53, with 1 adult, 52 juveniles, and 0 nestlings). Confirmed equine and avian cases infected with West Nile virus in 2004 are also indicated. Histograms correspond to site designations and indicate serologic titers (x-axes) measured by using a microneutralization test plotted against no. birds (y-axes).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2600177&req=5

Figure 1: Area of Camargue, France, showing locations of magpie capture sites: site A (n = 56, with 24 adults, 32 juveniles, and 0 nestlings), site B (n = 94, with 34 adults, 57 juveniles, and 3 nestlings), site C (n = 68, with 17 adults, 34 juveniles, and 17 nestlings), and site D (n = 53, with 1 adult, 52 juveniles, and 0 nestlings). Confirmed equine and avian cases infected with West Nile virus in 2004 are also indicated. Histograms correspond to site designations and indicate serologic titers (x-axes) measured by using a microneutralization test plotted against no. birds (y-axes).
Mentions: The study was conducted from late spring to early autumn 2005. Multicatch magpie traps, i.e., circular traps that catch <4 birds simultaneously, were set 1 day per week from July to September in different places within 3 areas (Figure, top panel). Area A contained dry and wet habitats in which some WNV equine cases were reported in 2004. Area B was a wetland in which most clinical equine cases occurred in 2004, and a WNV-positive magpie was detected in October 2004. Area C was a wetland in which a WNV-positive house sparrow (Passer domesticus) was detected in October 2004 (5). Additionally, some magpies were obtained in July and August 2005 from a crow ladder trap permanently set in area D, a dry area in which some horses had WNV infection in 2004. A few magpie nestlings were also sampled from their nest in May, June, and July 2005.

Bottom Line: European magpies (Pica pica) from southern France were tested for antibodies to West Nile virus (WNV) and viral shedding in feces during spring-autumn 2005.Results suggest that this peridomestic species may be a suitable sentinel species and a relevant target for additional investigations on WNV ecology in Europe.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre de Recherche de la Tour du Valat, Arles, France. elsa.jourdain@hik.se

ABSTRACT
European magpies (Pica pica) from southern France were tested for antibodies to West Nile virus (WNV) and viral shedding in feces during spring-autumn 2005. Results suggest that this peridomestic species may be a suitable sentinel species and a relevant target for additional investigations on WNV ecology in Europe.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus