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I am but mad North-northwest: when the wind is southerly I know a hawk from a handsaw.

Potter P - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia

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──William Shakespeare, Hamlet “The true north strong and choked with ice,” wrote Canadian poet Al Purdy, about the Arctic. “The sea ... was like the concentrated essence of all the blue that ever was; I could feel that blue seep into me and all my innards change colour... Purdy’s thrill at drifting with “the tides on Cumberland Sound and its blue fiord, [where] bergs and growlers are always in sight, even at the height of summer,” echoes the experience of many who visit the North; among them, Fred Machetanz, painter of iconic Alaska... North American artists, among them Eustace Ziegler, Ted Lambert, Sidney Laurence, Jules Dahlager, migrated to paint their romantic vision of “the last frontier” with its pristine wilderness and sparse inhabitants close to the land... Some of these visitors became the best landscape painters of the day... Much history of the Eskimo culture of North America in early 20th century, comes to us from the work of Danish anthropologist Knud Rasmussen, whose expedition crossed North America from east of Baffin Land to Alaska and across the Bering Straight to Siberia and lived to report conditions more inclement and dangerous for humans that nearly anywhere else in the world. “Cold and mosquitoes, / these two pests / come never together,” goes the Iglulik song, “I lay me down on the ice, / Lay me down on the snow and the ice, / Till my teeth fall chattering”... The art editor of Scribner’s, once joked about a Machetanz painting, “You’ve put a cherry colored head on that Eskimo. ” The painter corrected him, “If you see an Eskimo under a golden pink sun, you’re going to see a red exactly like that….People don’t realize the colors that we get here... Vermeer and Titian and those... They used a technique…where they first, on the canvas or board ... painted the entire painting in one color─white ... then ... layers of transparent color, which you could look through and eventually get the final result... A rifle, a toggling harpoon, and a sealskin float are visible from the side... The lithe vessel gliding noiselessly on the frigid waters allows immediate access to the hunt beneath the surface: seals, walruses, whales; in back, ice always in the invisible horizon. “When I get home / With a catch that does not suffice, / I usually say / It was the fish / That failed― / Up the stream”... Back in the 1980s, in his “Trees at the Arctic Circle,” Al Purdy contemplated the strength of these trees: “And you know it occurs to me / about 2 feet under / those roots must touch permafrost / ice that remains ice forever / and they use it for their nourishment / use death to remain alive. ” Now permafrost is melting... Heavily geared for ice, Arctic populations are facing yet another bout of rough weather, a warming trend... And unlike Shakespeare’s hero, they have no need to feign madness.

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Fred Machetanz (1908–2002). Quest for Avuk (1973). Oil on board (81.3 cm × 130.8 cm). Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center, Anchorage, Alaska. 1974.047.001. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Elmer E. Rasmuson
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Fa: Fred Machetanz (1908–2002). Quest for Avuk (1973). Oil on board (81.3 cm × 130.8 cm). Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center, Anchorage, Alaska. 1974.047.001. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Elmer E. Rasmuson


I am but mad North-northwest: when the wind is southerly I know a hawk from a handsaw.

Potter P - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2008)

Fred Machetanz (1908–2002). Quest for Avuk (1973). Oil on board (81.3 cm × 130.8 cm). Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center, Anchorage, Alaska. 1974.047.001. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Elmer E. Rasmuson
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2600173&req=5

Fa: Fred Machetanz (1908–2002). Quest for Avuk (1973). Oil on board (81.3 cm × 130.8 cm). Anchorage Museum at Rasmuson Center, Anchorage, Alaska. 1974.047.001. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Elmer E. Rasmuson

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

──William Shakespeare, Hamlet “The true north strong and choked with ice,” wrote Canadian poet Al Purdy, about the Arctic. “The sea ... was like the concentrated essence of all the blue that ever was; I could feel that blue seep into me and all my innards change colour... Purdy’s thrill at drifting with “the tides on Cumberland Sound and its blue fiord, [where] bergs and growlers are always in sight, even at the height of summer,” echoes the experience of many who visit the North; among them, Fred Machetanz, painter of iconic Alaska... North American artists, among them Eustace Ziegler, Ted Lambert, Sidney Laurence, Jules Dahlager, migrated to paint their romantic vision of “the last frontier” with its pristine wilderness and sparse inhabitants close to the land... Some of these visitors became the best landscape painters of the day... Much history of the Eskimo culture of North America in early 20th century, comes to us from the work of Danish anthropologist Knud Rasmussen, whose expedition crossed North America from east of Baffin Land to Alaska and across the Bering Straight to Siberia and lived to report conditions more inclement and dangerous for humans that nearly anywhere else in the world. “Cold and mosquitoes, / these two pests / come never together,” goes the Iglulik song, “I lay me down on the ice, / Lay me down on the snow and the ice, / Till my teeth fall chattering”... The art editor of Scribner’s, once joked about a Machetanz painting, “You’ve put a cherry colored head on that Eskimo. ” The painter corrected him, “If you see an Eskimo under a golden pink sun, you’re going to see a red exactly like that….People don’t realize the colors that we get here... Vermeer and Titian and those... They used a technique…where they first, on the canvas or board ... painted the entire painting in one color─white ... then ... layers of transparent color, which you could look through and eventually get the final result... A rifle, a toggling harpoon, and a sealskin float are visible from the side... The lithe vessel gliding noiselessly on the frigid waters allows immediate access to the hunt beneath the surface: seals, walruses, whales; in back, ice always in the invisible horizon. “When I get home / With a catch that does not suffice, / I usually say / It was the fish / That failed― / Up the stream”... Back in the 1980s, in his “Trees at the Arctic Circle,” Al Purdy contemplated the strength of these trees: “And you know it occurs to me / about 2 feet under / those roots must touch permafrost / ice that remains ice forever / and they use it for their nourishment / use death to remain alive. ” Now permafrost is melting... Heavily geared for ice, Arctic populations are facing yet another bout of rough weather, a warming trend... And unlike Shakespeare’s hero, they have no need to feign madness.

Show MeSH